Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1404 [1404]

K. Henry. 8. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Martyrs.

tried to the vttermost, and thou shalt haue the law.

Then hee required him that hee might haue iustice with equitie, and forthwith he should haue gone to the Tower, but that Gardiner and Foxe became his sureties that night, & so he came home to M. Parnels house agayne, and that night fell to writyng agayne and slept not, M. Couerdal, M. Gudwin and M. Felde being his writers: and in the morning he came to Yorke place to Gardiner and Foxe, and by and by he was committed to the Sergeant of armes to bring him into the chapter house at Westminster before the Byshops, and the Abbote of Westminster called Islip.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaStilliard mē examined for Lolardye.The same time when D. Barnes should appeare before the Cardinal, there were v. Stilliard mē to be examined for Luthers bookes and Lolardy, but after they spyed Barnes, they set the other a side, and asked the Sergeant of armes what was his errand. He sayd hee had brought one D. Barnes to be examined of heresie, and presented both his Articles and his accusers. Thē immediatly after a litle talke, they sware him & layd his articles to him. Who like as he answered the cardinal before, so said he vnto them, and thē he offred the booke of his probations vnto them. Who asked him whether he had an other for him selfe, and he sayd yea, shewyng it vnto thē. Who thē tooke it frō him, & said they should haue no leasure to dispute with him at that present for other affaires of the kings maiestie, which thei had to do, & therfore bad him stand a side. MarginaliaThe Silliard mā cōmitted to the Fleete.Then they called the Stilliard men again one by one, & when they were examined, they called forth þe Master of the Flete, and they were committed al to the Fleete. MarginaliaD. Barnes with yonge Parnell cōmitted to the Fleete.Then they called D. Barnes agayne, and asked him whether hee would subscribe to his Articles or no, and hee subscribed willingly: and thē they committed him and young M. Parnell to the Fleete also with þe other. There they remained till Saterday in the morning, and the Warden of the Fleete was commaūded that no man should speake with him.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaD. Barnes & the Stilliard men brought agayne before the Cardinall.On þe saterday he came again afore thē into the chapter house, & there with þe stilliard men remained till v. a clock at night, and after long disputatiōs, threatnings, laughings & skornings, about. v. a clocke at night, they called hym, to knowe whether he woulde abiure or burne. He was then in a great agony, and thought rather to burne thē to abiure. MarginaliaD. Barnes perswaded by Gardiner and Foxe, to abiure.But thē was he sent again to haue the counsell of Gardiner and Foxe, and they perswaded hym rather to abiure then to burne, because (they said ) he should do more in time to come, and with diuers other perswasions that were mighty in the sight of reason and foolishe fleshe. Vpon that, kneling vpon his knees, he consented to abiure, and the abiuration put in hys hand, he abiured as it was there wrytten, and then he subscribed with his owne hand: and yet they woulde skarsly receyue hym into the bosome of the church, as they termed it. Then they put hym to an oth, and charged him to execute, doo, & fulfill al that they commaunded hym, & he promised so to do.

[Back to Top]

Then 

Commentary  *  Close

Barnes' abjuration took place on 11 February 1526.

they comaunded the Warden of the Flete to cary him with his fellowes to the place from whēce he came, and to be keept in close prison, and in the morning to prouide v. fagots for D. Barnes, & the iiij. stilliard mē. The v. Stilliard mā was cōmaunded to haue a taper of v. pounde waight to bee prouided for hym, to offer to the roode of Northen in Paules, and all these things to be ready by viij. of the clocke in the morning, and that he with all that he could make, with billes and gleues, & the knight Marshall withall hys tippe staues that he could make, should bring them to Paules, and conduct them home againe. In the morning they were all ready by their houre appointed in Paules churche, the church being so full that no man could get in. The Cardinall had a skaffold made on the toppe of the staires for him selfe, with xxxvj. Abbots, mitred Priors and Bishops, and he in hys whole pompe mitred (which Barnes spake against) satte ther inthronized, hys chap- lens and spirituall Doctors in gownes of damaske and Saten, and he him selfe in Purple, euen lyke a bloudy Antichrist. And there was a new pulpet erected on the top of the staires also, for the Byshop of Rochester to preach against Luther and D. Barnes: and great baskets ful of bokes standing before thē within the railes, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes and the Stilliard men beare fagottes.which was cōmaunded after the great fyre was made afore the roode of Northen there to be burned, & these heretikes after the sermond to go thrise about the fyre, and to cast in their fagots.

[Back to Top]

Nowe while the Sermon was a doing, Doct. Barnes and the Stilliard men were commaunded to kneele downe and aske God forgeuenes, the catholike Churche, and Cardinals grace, and after that he was commaunded at the end of the sermon to declare that he was more charitablier handled, then he deserued or was worthye (hys heresies were so horrible and so detestable) & once again kneled down on his knees, and desiring the people of forgeuenes and to praye for him, and so the Cardinall departed vnder a canapye with all hys mitred mē with hym, till he came to the second gate of Paules, and then he tooke his Mule, and the mitred men came backe agayne. Then these poore men beyng commaunded to come downe from the stage (whereon the swepers vse to stand when they swepe the Churche) the Byshops satte them downe againe and cōmaunded þe knight Marshall & the Warden of the Fleete, with their company, to cary them about the fire, & so were they brought to the Byshops, and there for absolution kneled down. MarginaliaDayes of pardon geuen for hearyng a popishe sermon.Where Rochester stoode vp and declared vnto the people how many dayes of pardon and forgeuenes of sinnes they had for beyng at that Sermon, and there did assoile Doct. Barnes with the other, and shewed þe people that they were receyued into the Churche agayne.

[Back to Top]

This done, the Warden of the Fleete & the knyght Marshall were commaūded to haue them to the Fleete agayne, and charged that they should haue the lybertie of the Fleete as other prisoners had, and that theyr frendes might resort vnto them, and there to remaine till the Lord Cardinals pleasure were knowen.

[Back to Top]

After that Barnes there in the Fleete had cōtinued the space of halfe a yeare, at length beyng deliuered, was committed to be free prisoner at the Austē Friers in Londō. When those Caterpillers & bloudy beastes had there vndermined hym, they complayned agayne to their Lord Cardinall. Wherupon he was remoued to the Austen Friers of Northampton, there to be burned. Yet he hym selfe vnderstandyng nothyng therof, but supposing still that he should there remaine and cōtinue in free prison, at last 

Commentary  *  Close

Barnes' escape took place in 1528. The deception involved in this episode was subsequently criticised by Catholic polemicists: see Robert Persons, A treatise of three conversions of England (STC 19416: St. Omer, 1604), vol. III p.181.

one M. Horne, who had brought him vp, and was his speciall frend, hauing intelligēce of þe writte which should shortly be sent down to burne him, gaue him counsaile to fayne him selfe to be desperate, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes fayned him self to be drowned.and that hee should write a letter to the Cardinall and leaue it on his table where hee laye, and a paper by, to declare whether he was gone to drown him self, and to leaue his clothes in the same place: and there an other letter to be left to the Maior of þe towne to searche for hym in the water, because he had a letter written in parchment about hys necke closed in waxe, for the Cardinall, whiche woulde teach all men to beware by him. Vpon this they were vij. daies in searchyng for hym, but hee was conueyed to London in a poore mans apparell, and so taryed not there but tooke shypping and went by long Seas to Antwarpe, and so to Luther, and there fell to study till he had made aunswere to all the Byshops of þe Realme, MarginaliaActa Romanorum pontificum, made by Doct. Barnes.and had made a booke intituled, Acta Romanorum pontificum, 
Commentary  *  Close

Barnes' Vitae Romanorum pontificorum was actually first published in 1536, in two editions, one in Wittenberg, the other in Basel.

& an other booke with a supplication 
Commentary  *  Close

There were two, sharply differing editions of this text: A supplicatyon made by Robert Barnes doctour in diuinite, vnto the most excellent and redoubted prince kinge henrye the eyght (STC 1470: Antwerp, 1531), and a more politic revision, A supplicacion vnto the most gracyous prynce H. the .viij. (STC 1471: London, 1534).

[Back to Top]
to K. Henry. Immediatly it was told the Cardinall, that he was drowned, and he sayd, Petit memoria eius cū sonitu. But this did light vpon hym selfe shortly after, whiche wretchedly dyed at Leicester.

[Back to Top]

In the meane season D. Barnes was made strong

in
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield