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1405 [1405]

K. Henry. 8. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Martyrs.

in Christ, and got fauour both of the learned in Christ, and foreine Princes in Germany, and was great with Luther, Melancthon, Pomeran, Iustus Ionas, Hegendorphinus and Æpinus, and with the Duke of Saxon, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes sent Ambassadour from the kyng of Denmarke to kyng Henry, into England.and the kyng of Denmarke, which kyng of Denmarke in the tyme of More and Stokesley 

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In fact this embassy took place in the summer of 1534. Foxe is here referring to Barnes' visit to England in 1531-32, as an envoy from the Wittenberg theologians.

sent hym with the Lubeckes, as an Ambassadour, to kyng Henry the viij. He lay with the Lubeckes Chauncellor at the Stilliard.

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MarginaliaSyr Thomas More sought the death of Doct. Barnes.Syr Tho. More then Chaūcellour, would faine haue entrapped him, but þe kyng would not let hym, for Crōwel was his great frend. And ere he went, þe Lubeckes and he disputed with the Byshops of this realme in defence of the truth, and so hee departed agayne without restraynt with the Lubeckes. After hys goyng agayne to Wittemb. to the Duke of Saxon, and to Luther, he remained there to set forwardes hys workes in Print that he had begon, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes returned again into England in the tyme of Queene Anne.from whence hee returned agayne in the beginning of þe raigne of Queene Anne, as other did, and continued a faythfull preacher in this Citie 

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This sweeping description of the 1530s omits the significant amount of time Barnes spent on the Continent, including a lengthy trip to Wittenberg in 1535-6.

, beyng all her tyme well entertained and promoted. MarginaliaDoct. Barnes sent Ambassadour by kyng Henry, to the Duke of Cleue.After that 
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This embassy took place in 1539.

, he was sent Ambassadour by king Henry the viij. to the Duke of Cleue, for the mariage of the Lady Anne of Cleue, betwene the kyng and her, and was well accepted in that Ambassade and in all hys doynges, vntill the tyme that Ste. Gardiner 
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This is a typical example of how conspiracy theories clustered around Gardiner in Foxe's work and in the wider English Protestant imagination. See Alec Ryrie, '"A Saynt in the Devyls Name": Heroes and Villains in the Martyrdom of Robert Barnes' in Thomas S. Freeman and Thomas F. Mayer (eds), Martyrs and Martyrdom in England, c.1400-1700 (Woodbridge, 2007), 144-65.

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came out of Fraunce: but after he came, neither Religion prospered, nor the Queenes maiestie, nor Cromwell, nor the preachers, who after the mariage of the Lady Anne of Cleue, neuer ceased vntill hee had grafted the mariage in an other stocke, by the occasion wherof hee began hys bloudy broyle.

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For not long after, Doct. Barnes with his brethren were apprehended & caryed before the kyngs Maiestie to Hamptō Court, & there he was examined. Where the kings maiestie seking the meanes of his safetie, to bryng Winchester and hym agreed, at Winchesters request, graunted him leaue to go home with þe Bishop to conferre with hym, & so he did. But as it happened they not agreeyng, Gardiner and hys comparteners sought by all subtile meanes, how to entangle and to entrappe them in further daunger, which not long after was brought to passe. For by certaine complaintes made to the kyng of thē, they were inioyned to preach iij. Sermons the next Easter folowyng at the Spittle. At the which Sermons, besides other reporters which were thether sent, Ste. Gardiner also was there present sitting with the Maior, eyther to beare recorde of their recantation, or els as þe Phariseis came to Christ, to trippe thē in their talke, if they had spoken any thing awry. Whē these iij. had thus preached their Sermōs, among whō Barnes preachyng the first Sermon, and seyng Ste. Gardiner there present, humbly desired hym in the face of all the audience, if hee forgaue him to hold vp his hand, and the sayd Gardiner thereupon helde vp his finger 

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The source for this particular allegation, only introduced in 1570, is unclear. On Gardiner's own account, he was surprised by this request from the pulpit, directed at him, and being 'encombred with shamefastnes', took a moment to respond. Gardiner, A declaration, fo. 9v.

: yet notwithstāding shortlye after by the meanes of the sayd reporters, they were sent for to Hampton Court: who from thence were caryed to þe Tower by Syr Iohn Gostwike. Frō whence they neuer came out till they came to their death, as hereafter Christ willing shall more appeare.

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And thus hetherto cōcerning the hystory of Barnes. Now let vs lykewise consider the story and doynges of Thomas Garet.

¶ The story of Tho. Garet, or Garrerd, and of his trouble in Oxford, testified and recorded by Anthony Dalaber, who was there present the same time. 
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The main source for the account of Thomas Garret is a lengthy testimony of events in 1528 written by Anthony Dalaber, apparently specifically for Foxe's use. As Foxe tells us (1583, p. 1197), Dalaber died in Salisbury diocese in 1562, leaving his account unfinished. His text is reproduced apparently in full in 1563. There are some minor abridgements of Dalaber's account in 1570 and subsequent editions, mostly to omit digressions, lists of names or personal details apparently irrelevant to Garret's case. The remainder of Foxe's account of Garret is far sketchier and is assembled from the accounts of unnamed 'auncient and credible persones'.

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MarginaliaTho. Garret brought bokes to Oxforde.ABout the yeare of our Lord. 1526. 

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Garret became curate at All Hallows in or shortly before 1526. He made bookselling trips to Oxford in 1527 and again over the winter of 1527-28. His detection and flight took place in February 1528.

Maister Garet Curate of Hony Lane in London, came vnto Oxford, and brought with hym sondry bookes in Latin treatyng of the Scripture, with the first part of Vnio dissidentium, 
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'Hermann Bodius' (ps.: possibly Martin Bucer or Johannes Oecolampadius), Unio Dissidentium (Cologne, 1522) was a collection of patristic sentences intended to demonstrate the Church Fathers' congruence with evangelical thought. It went through over a dozen editions in several languages by the mid-1530s and was widely influential. An English translation was prepared by William Turner, but not until the 1530s. It strongly influenced Robert Barnes' 1530 Sententiae ex doctoribus collectae, which itself shaped Barnes' 1531 Supplication.

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and Tindals first trāslation of the new Testament in English, the whiche bookes he sold to di-uers scholers in Oxford.

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MarginaliaGaret sought for at London.After he had bene there a while, and had dispatched those bookes, newes came from London that hee was searched for through all London to be apprehēded and taken as an hereticke, & to be imprisoned for sellyng of those hereticall bookes (as they termed them) because they spake agaynst the vsurped authoritie, and erronious doctrine of the Byshop of Rome, and hys no lesse impure & filthy Synagoge. For it was not vnknowē to Cardinall Wolsey, & to the B. of London, and to other of that vngodly generation, that M. Garret had a great nūber of those bookes, & that he was gone to Oxford to make sale of them there, to such as hee knew to bee the louers of þe Gospell. MarginaliaA priuie search in Oxford for Garret.Wherfore they determined forthwith to make a priuie search thorow all Oxford to apprehend and imprison hym, and to burne all and euery hys aforesaid bookes and hym too, if they could: so burnyng hoate was their charitie. MarginaliaM. Cole of Magdalen Coledge in Oxforde.But yet at that tyme one of the foresayd Proctors, called M. Cole of Magdalene Colledge, who after was Crosse bearer vnto Cardinall Wolsey, was well acquaynted with M. Garret, and therfore hee gaue secret warnyng vnto a frend or two of M. Garrets of this priuie search, and willed therfore that he should forthwith as secretly as he could, depart out of Oxford, for if he were takē in the same search, no remedy but he should be forthwith sent vp vnto the Cardinall, and so should be committed vnto the Tower.

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MarginaliaAnthonye Dalaber scholer of Alborne Hall, reporter hereof.The Christmas before that tyme, I Anthony Dalaber then scholer of Alborne Hall, who had bokes of M. Garrets, had ben in my coūtry in Dorsetshyre at Stalbridge where I had a brother Person of that Parishe, who was very desirous to haue a Curate out of Oxford, and willed me in any wyse to get hym one there if I could. This iust occasion offred, it was thought good among the brethren (for so did we not only call one an other, but were in dede one to an other) that M. Garret chaungyng hys name, should be sent forth with my letters into Dorsetshyre vnto my brother, to serue him there for a tyme, vntill hee might secretlye from thence conuey hym selfe somewhether ouer the Sea. MarginaliaBrother agaynst brother.Accordyng hereunto I wrote my letters in all hast possible vnto my brother, for M. Garret to be hys Curate, but not declaryng what he was in deede, for my brother was a rancke Papist, and after was the most mortall enemy that euer I had for the Gospels sake.

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So the wedensay 

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In 1528 the Wednesday before Shrovetide fell on 18 February.

in þe morning before Shroftide, M. Garret departed out of Oxforde, toward Dorsetshyre, with my letters for his new seruice. How farre he went, and by what occasion he so soone returned, I know not. MarginaliaGarret takē in the priuie search.But the Friday next, in the night tyme he came againe to Radleis house, where he laye before, and so after midnight in the priuie search, whiche was then made for him, he was apprehended and taken there in his bed by the two Proctours, and on the Saterday in the morning deliuered vnto one D. Cotisford, maister of Lincoln Colledge, then being Cōmissarie of the vniuersitie, who kept him as prisoner in his own chamber. There was great ioy and reioycing among all the Papistes for his apprehension, and specially with D. London, Warden of the new Colledge, and D. Higdon Deane of Frideswides, two Archpapists. Who immediatelye sent their letters in post hast vnto the Cardinall, to enforme him of the apprehension of this notable hereticke: for the which their doing, they were well assured to haue great thankes. But of al this sodaine hurley burley, was I vtterly ignorant, so that I knew neither of M. Garrets so sodayne returne, neyther that he was so taken, vntyll that afterwardes he came vnto my chamber, being then in Glocester Colledge, as a man amazed, and as soone as he saw me, he sayd he was vndone, for he was taken. This he spake vnaduisedlye in the presence of a yong man that came with him. When the yong mā was departed, I asked him what he was, and what ac-

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