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1407 [1407]

K. Henry. 8. Doct. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Martyrs.

I taried & supped with thē. At which supper we were not verye mery, considering our state & peril at hand.

Whē we had ended our supper, and committed our whole cause with feruent sighes and harty prayers vnto God our heauenly father, I went to Alborne Hall and there lay that nyght. In the mornyng I was vp very early, and as soone as I could get out at the doore, I went straight towardes Glocester Colledge to my chāber. It had rayned that mornyng, and with my goyng I had all to bee sprinckled my hose and my shoes with myre. And when I was come into Glocester Colledge, whiche was about vj. of the clocke, I founde the gates fast shutte. Wherat I did much meruell, for they were wont to bee opened dayly long before that tyme. Then did I walke vp and downe by the wall there, a whole houre before the gates were opened. In the meane while, my musing head being full of forecasting cares, & my sorowful hart flowing with douleful sighes, I fully determined in my conscience before God, that if I should chaūce to bee taken & be examined, I would accuse no man, nor declare any thyng further then I did already perceyue was manifestly knowen before. And so whē the gate was opened, thynkyng to shift my selfe and to put on a lōger gowne, I went in towardes my chamber, and goyng vp the stayres, would haue opened my doore, but I could not in a long season do it. MarginaliaDalabers chamber searched for M. Garret.Wherby I perceyued that my locke had bene medled withall, and therwith was somwhat altered. Yet at last with much a do I opened the locke and went in. Whē I came in, I saw my bed all to tossed and tumbled, my clothes in my presse throwen downe, and my studye doore open. Wherof I was much amased, and thought verely that some searche was made there that night for M. Garet, and that it was knowne of his beyng with me, by the Mōkes man that brought him to my chāber.

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Now was there lying in the next chamber vnto me a Mōke, who assoone as he heard me in þe chāber, came to me & tolde how M. Garret was sought in my chamber that nyght, and what a do there was made by the Commissary and the ij. Proctors, with billes & swordes thrusted thorow my bedstraw, and how euery corner of my chamber was searched for M. Garret. And albeit hys gowne and hode lay there in my presse with my clothes, yet they perceyued them not. Then he told me that he was cōmaūded to bryng me as soone as I came in, vnto þe Prior of the studentes named Antony Dunstane, a Monke of Westminster. This so troubled me that I forgot to make cleane my hose and shoes, and to shift me into an other gowne: MarginaliaDalaber brought to the Prior of Glocester Colledge.and therfore, so all to bee dirted as I was, and in my short gowne, I went with him to the sayd Priors chamber, where I found þe sayd Prior standyng and lookyng for my commyng. He asked me where I had bene that night. I told hym I lay at Alborne Hall with my old bedfelow Fitziames, but he would not beleue me. He asked me if M. Garret were with me yesterday. I told hym yea. Then hee would know where he was, and wherfore he came vnto me. I told hym I knew not where he was except hee were at Woodstocke. For so (sayd I) he had shewed me that he would goe thether, because one of the kepers there his frend, had promised him a peece of veneson to make mery withal that Shrofetyde, and that he would haue borowed a hatte and a payre of hygh shoes of me, but I had none in deede to lēd him. This tale I thought meetest, though it were nothyng so. Then had he spyed on my fore finger a byg ryng of siluer very well double gilted with ij. letters A. D. ingraued in it for my name: I suppose he thought it to be gold. He required to see it. I tooke it vnto hym. MarginaliaAnthonye Dalabers ringe taken from hym.Whē he had it in his hand, he sayd it was his ring, for therin was his name, an A. for Antony, and a D. for Dunstane. Whē I heard him so say, I wished in my hart to bee as well deliuered from and out of his company, as I was assured to bee deliuered from my ryng for euer.

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Then he called for pen, inke, and paper, and cōmaū-ded me to write whē and how Garret came vnto me, and where he was become. I had not written scarsly three wordes, but þe chief bedle with ij. or iij. of the Cōmissaries men, were come vnto master Prior, requiryng hym straightwayes to bryng vs away vnto Lyncolne Colledge to the Commissary and to D. London. Whether when I was brought into the chapell, there I found D. Cotisforde Commissarie, D. Higdon then Deane of the Cardinals Colledge, and D. London Warden of the new Colledge stādyng together at the altar in the chappell. When I was brought vnto thē, after salutations giuen and taken betwene them, they called for chayres and sat downe, MarginaliaAnthonye Dalaber apprehended and troubled for Master Garret.and called for me to come to them, and first they asked what my name was. I told thē that my name was Antony Dalaber. Then they also asked me how long I had bene student in the Vniuersitie, and I told thē almost iij. yeares. And they asked me what I studyed. I told them that I had read sophistrie and Logicke in Alborne Hall, and now was remoued vnto Glocester Colledge to study the Ciuill law, the whiche the foresayd Prior of the studentes affirmed to bee true. Then they asked me whether I knew M. Garret, and how long had knowen hym. I told them I knew hym well, and had knowen hym almost a tweluemoneth. They asked me when hee was with me. I told them yesterday at after none.

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Now by this time, whiles they had me in this talke, one came in vnto them whiche was sent for, with pen, inke, and paper, I trow it was the Clerke of the Vniuersitie. As soone as he was come, there was a bourd & tresles with a forme for hym to sit on, set betwene the Doctours and me, MarginaliaThe examination of Antony Dalaber.and a great Masse booke layd before me, and I was commaunded to lay my right hand on it and to swere that I should truly aunswere vnto such articles and interrogatories as I should be by them examined vpon. I made daunger of it a while at first, but afterward beyng persuaded by them, partly by fayre wordes, and partly by great threates, I promised to do as they would haue me, but in my hart nothyng so mēt to do. So I layd my hand on the booke, and one of them gaue me my othe, and that done commaunded me to kysse the booke. Then made they great curtesie betwen them who should examine me, & minister interrogatories vnto me. MarginaliaD. Lōdon Warden of the newe Colledge, an Archpharisey.At the last, the rankest Papisticall Pharisey of them all D. London tooke vpon him to do it.

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Then hee asked me agayne by my othe, where M. Garret was, and whether I had conueyed him. I tolde hym I had not conueyed hym, nor yet wyste not where he was, nor whether hee was gone, excepte hee were gone to Wodstocke (as I had before said) as he shewed me he would. Then he asked me agayne whē he came to me, how he came to me, what & how lōg he talked with me, & whether he went frō me. I tolde him he came to me about euensong tyme, & that one brought him vnto my chāber doore, whō I know not, & that he told me hee would go to Wodstocke for some venison to make mery withall this Shroftyde, and that hee would haue borowed a hat, & a payre of hygh shoes of me, but I had none such to lend hym, and then hee straight went hys way from me, but whether I know not. All these my sayinges the scribe wrote in a paper booke.

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Then they earnestly required me to tell them whether I had cōueyed hym, for surely they sayd I brought hym goyng some whether this mornyng, for that they might wel perceiue by my foule shoes and dirty hosen, that I had trauailed with hym the most parte of this night. I aunswered playnly that I lay at Alborne Hall with Syr Fitziames, and that I had good witnes therof there. They asked me where I was at euensong. I tolde thē at Friswides, and that I saw first master Cōmissary, and then master D. London come thether at that tyme vnto master Deane of Frisewides, and that I saw thē talking together in the Church there. Doct. London and the Deane threatned me, that if I would

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