Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1408 [1408]

K. Henry. 8. Doct. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Martyrs.

not tell the truth where I had done hym, or whether he was gone, I should surely bee sent vnto the Tower of London, and there be racked, & put into litle ease. But master Commissary prayed me with gentle wordes to tell hym where he was that he might haue him agayn, and he would bee my very great frend and deliuer me out of trouble straightway. I told him I could not tell where he was nor whether he was become. Thus dyd they occupy and tosse me almost ij. houres in the chappell, sometymes with threatninges and foule wordes, and then with fayre wordes and fayre promises flatteryng me. Then was hee that brought M. Garret vnto my chamber brought before me and caused to declare what M. Garret sayd vnto me at hys commyng to my chamber, but I sayd playnly I heard hym say no such thyng for I thought my nay to be as good as hys yea, seyng it was to ridde and deliuer my godly brother out of trouble and perill of hys lyfe.

[Back to Top]

At þe last, whē they could gette nothing of me wherby to hurt or accuse any man, or to know any thyng of that whiche they sought, they all iij. together brought me vp a long staires into a great chāber ouer M. Cōmissaries chamber, wherin stode a great payre of very high stockes. MarginaliaAnthonye Dalaber set in the stockes.Then M. Commissarye asked me for my purse & girdle, tooke away my mony & my kniues, and thē they put both my legges into þe stockes, & so locked me fast in them: in which I sat, my feete being almost as high as my head, and so departed they (I thinke to their abominable Masse) locking fast the chāber doore, & leauyng me alone. When all they were gone, then came vnto my remembraunce the worthy forewarning and godly declaration of that most constant Martyr of God Master Iohn Clarke, my father in Christ, who welnigh two yeares before that, when I did earnestlye desire him to graunt me to be his scholer, and that I might go with him continually when and where soeuer hee should teach or preach (the which he did dayly) said vnto me much after this sort: MarginaliaThe wordes and exhortatiō of M. Clarke to Antony Dalaber.Dalaber, you desire you wot not what, and that you are, I feare me, vnable to take vpon you. For thoughe now my preaching be swete and pleasant vnto you, because there is yet no persecution layd on you for it, yet the time wyll come, and that peraduenture shortlye, if ye continue to lyue godly therein, that God wyll laye on you the crosse of persecutiō, to try you withall, whether you can as pure gold abide the fire, or as stubble and drosse be cōsumed therwith. For the holy Ghost playnly affirmeth by S. Paule 

Commentary  *  Close

2 Timothy 3:12.

, quod omnes qui pie volunt viuere in Christo Iesu, persecutionem patientur. Marginalia2. Tim. 3.Yea, you shall bee called and iudged an hereticke, you shall bee abhorred of the world, your own frendes and kynsfolke will forsake you, and also hate you, and you shall be cast into prison and no man shall dare to helpe or comforte you, you shall be accused and brought before the Bishops, to your reproch and shame, to the great sorrow of all your faithful frendes and kinsfolke. MarginaliaThe crosse commonly followeth the Gospel.Then will ye wish ye had neuer knowen this doctrine. Then will ye curse Clarke, & wish that ye had neuer knowen him, because he hath brought you to all these troubles. Therefore rather then that ye should do this, leaue of from medling of this doctrine, and desire not to be and continue in my company.

[Back to Top]

At which his wordes I was so grieued, that I fell down on my knees at his feete, & with abundaunce of teares & sighes euē frō þe bottome of my hart, I earnestly besought him, that for þe tender mercy of god shewed vnto vs in our Lord Iesus Christ, he would not refuse me, but receiue me into his cōpanie, as I had desired, saying that I trusted verely, that he which had begōne this in me, would not forsake me, but giue me grace to continue therin vnto the end. Whē he heard me say so, he came to me, & tooke me vp in his armes, kyssed me, the teares trickling downe from his eyes, and sayd vnto me: The Lord almightye graunt you so to do, and from hence forth for euer take me for your father, and I wyll take you for my sonne in Christ. Nowe were there at that tyme in Oxford, diuers Graduates and Scholers of sundry Colleges and Halles, whom God had called to the knowledge of his holy woord, which al resorted vnto maister Clarkes disputatiōs and lectures in diuinitie at all times as they myght: and when they might not come conueniently, I was by Maister Clarke appointed to resorte vnto euery of them wekely, and to know what doubtes they had in any place of the scriptures, that by me from him they might haue the true vnderstanding of the same: which exercise dyd me most good and profit to the vnderstanding of the holy scriptures, which I most desired.

[Back to Top]

This foresayd forewarning and godly declaration (I say) of this most godly Martyr of God M. Clarke, comming then to my remembraunce, MarginaliaDalaber armed wiht pacience and constancie.caused me with deepe sighes to cry vnto God from my hart, to assist me with his holy spirite, that I myght be able pacientlye and quietly to beare and suffer whatsoeuer it shoulde please him of his fatherly loue to lay on me, to his glorie, and the comfort of my dearelye beloued brethren, whom I thought now to be in great feare & anguishe, lest I woulde be an accuser of them all, for vnto me they all were well knowen: and all their doinges in that matter. But God be blessed, I was fully bent neuer to accuse any of them, what soeuer should happen of me. Before dynner maister Cotisford MarginaliaD. Cotisford persecuter of Dalaber and Garret.came vp to me, and requested me earnestly to tell him where Maister Garret was, and if I would so do, he promised me straightwayes to deliuer me out of prison. But I told him I could not tell where he was: no more in deede I coulde. Then hee departed to dinner, asking me if I would eate any meate, and I tolde him, yea right gladly. He sayd he would sende me some. When hee was gone, his seruaunts asked me diuers questions, which I do not now remember, and some of them spake me faire, and some threatned me, calling me hereticke, and so departed, locking the doore fast vpon me.

[Back to Top]

Thus farre Antony Dalaber hath prosecuted this storye, who before the finishing, departed the yeare, 1562. in the dioces of Salisbury: the residue thereof as we coulde gather it of aunciēt and credible persons, so haue we added here vnto the same.

MarginaliaTho. Garret apprehended and brought to Oxforde.After this, Garret was apprehended or taken by maister Cole the Proctor or his men, going westward, at a place called Hinksey 

Commentary  *  Close

Garret was in fact apprehended on 29 February 1528 at Bedminster, on the outskirts of Bristol.

a litle beyond Oxford, and so being brought backe agayne, was cōmitted to Warde, that done, he was conuented before the Commissarye, MarginaliaD. Lōdon, & D. Higdon, persecuters of Garret.Doctor London and Doctor Higdon Deane of Friswides (now called Christes Colledge) into S. Maries church, where they sitting in iudgement, conuicted him according to their law as an hereticke (as they sayde) MarginaliaGarret and Dalaber bare fagottes in Oxforde.and afterward compelled him to carie a faggot in open processiō from S. Maries church to Friswides, and Dalaber likewise with hym, Garret hauing his red hoode on his shoulders like a maister of Arte. After that, they were sent to Osney, there to be kept in prison till farther order was taken.

[Back to Top]

There were suspected beside, a great nomber to be infected with heresie, as they called it, for hauing suche bookes of Gods truth, as Garret sold vnto them, as M. Clarke, 

Commentary  *  Close

The source for this list of names is not clear, although most of them are also names which appear in Dalaber's unabridged account. Foxe's statement that 'diuers other there were, whose names I cannot remember', suggests either that he is here reproducing another document, or, possibly, that he is drawing on his own first-hand knowledge of Oxford heresy. Foxe first went up to Oxford in 1534.

[Back to Top]
which died in his chamber, and coulde not be suffered to receiue the Communion, being in prison, and saying these woordes: Crede, & manducasti. MarginaliaThe names of godly brethren at Oxforde.Master Somner, Maister Bettes, Tauerner the Musicion, Radley, with other of Friswides colledge, of Corpus Christi Colledge, as Vdal & Diet with other, of Magdalen Colledge one Eeden, with other of Glocester Colledge, & two blacke Monkes, one of S. Austines of Caunterbury named Langporte, the other of S. Edmonds bury Monke, named Iohn Salesburye, two white Monkes of Barnard Colledge, two Chanons of S. Maries Colledge, MarginaliaRob. Ferrar Byshop of S. Dauies.one of them named Robet Ferrar afterward bishop of S. Dauies, & burned in queene Maries time. These ij. Chanons, because they had no

[Back to Top]
place
QQQ.ij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield