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1427 [1427]

K. Hen. 8. Persecutiō in Windsore. Testwood, Filmer, Person, Marbecke, Bennet.

place to Doctor Clifton standing directly before him in the myddest of the Queere, with a glorious golden cope vpon hys backe, hauing the pixe in his hande, and sayd: Sir, Maister Hake hath Saint Georges dagger. Now if he had hys horse, and S. Martins cloke, and M. Iohn Shornes bootes, with king Harries spurres and hys hat, he might ride when he would 

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St Martin, a fourth century bishop of Tours, was famous for sharing his cloak with a beggar. John Schorne was a fourteenth-century rector of North Marston, who was popularly venerated as a saint. His body was moved to Windsor in 1478, where it was an extremely popular pilgrimage site. Schorne was credited with trapping the devil in a boot during an exorcism and his boots were credited with the power to heal gout.

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, and so stepped in to his place againe. Whereat the other chaunged colour, and wist not what to say.

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¶ An other cause of Testwoddes trouble.

MarginaliaM. Francklen Deane of Windsore.IN the dayes of M. Frāklen, who succeded D. Sampson in the Deanery of Wyndsore 

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William Franklin became dean of Windsor in 1536 after Thomas Sampson was promoted to the bishopric of Chichester.

, there was on a tyme, set vp at the Queere doore, a certaine foolishe printed paper in meter, all to the prayse and commendatiō of our Lady, MarginaliaBlasphemie and Idolatrye to our Ladye.ascribyng vnto her, our Iustification, our saluation, our redemption, the forgiuenes of sinnes. &c. to the great derogation of Christ. Whiche paper, one of the Canons called M. Magnus (as it was reported) caused to bee set vp in despite of Testwod and hys secte. When Testwod sawe this paper, he pluckt it downe secretely. The next day after was an other set vp in the same place. Then Testwod comming into the Church, and seing an other paper set vp, and also þe Deane comming a litle way of, made haste to be in at the Queere doore, while the Deane stayde to take holy water, MarginaliaTestwoode taketh downe the blasphemous paper.and reaching vp his hand as he went, pluckt away the paper with him. The Deane beyng come to hys stall, called Testwod vnto him and sayde, that he marueiled greatly how he durst be so bold to take down that paper in hys presence. Testwod aunswered againe, that he marueyled much more, that his mastership would suffer such a blasphemous paper to be set vp, beseeching him not to be offended with that he had done, for he would stande vnto it. So M. Deane being a timerous man, made no more a doe wyth hym. After this were no mo papers set vp, but poore Testwod was eaten and drunken among them at euery meale, and an hereticke he was, and woulde rost a fagot for this geare one day.

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MarginaliaM. Magnus magnus idololatra.Now maister Magnus being sore offended with Testwod for plucking downe his papers, to be reuenged on him, deuised with the Deane and þe rest of the Canons, to send their letters to D. Chamber, one of their brethren, and the kinges Phisicion, who lay (for the most part) at the court, to see what he could doo agaynst Testwod. MarginaliaConspiracie of the Priestes of windsore agaynste Testwoode.Which letters being made, were sent with speede. But whatsoeuer the cause was, whether he durst not meddle for feare of Cromwell, or what els I cannot tell, their sute came to none effect. Then wist they not what to doo, but determined to let the matter sleepe, til Saint Georges feast 

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I.e., 23 April.

, which was not farre of.

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Now in the meane time, there chaunced a prety storie, betwene one Robert Philips, Gentleman of the kings Chappel 

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The Gentleman of the Chapel Royal were singers and musicians who served the royal court and followed the king on his perambulations. When the king was at Windsor - as he was in this case for the Feast of St. George - the members of this choir joined with the regular choir of St. George's chapel.

, and Testwod. Which story, though it was but a mery pranke of a singing man, yet it greeued hys aduersarie wonderfullye. The matter was this. Robert Philips was so notable a singing man (wherin he gloried) that whersoeuer he came, the best & longest song, with most counteruerses in it, should be set vp at his cōming. And so his chaūce being now to be at Windsore, against his cōming to þe Antheme, a long song was set vp, called Lauda viui. MarginaliaA blasphemous Antheme, calling the virgin Mary our Sauiour and redeemer.In the which song there was one counteruerse toward thend, that began on this wyse: O redēptrix & saluatrix. Which verse of all other, Robert Philips woulde sing, because hee knew that Testwod could not abide that ditty. Nowe Testwod knowing his minde wel enough, ioyned with him at the other part: MarginaliaA mery cōtention betwene Rob. Philips of the kinges chappell, and Testwoode, about O Redēptrix, and Non Redēptrix.and when he hearde Robert Philips begyn to fetch his oorish with O redemptrix & saluatrix, repeating þe same one in an others necke, Testwod was as quicke on the other side to aunswere hym agayn with Non redemptrix, nec saluatrix, and so striuing togethers with O and Non, who shoulde haue the mastry, they made an end of the verse. Wher-at was good laughing in sleeues of some, but Rob. Philips wt other of Testwods enemies, were sore offēded.

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Within 14. dayes after this, the Lordes of the Garter (as their custome is yearlye to doo) came to Wyndesore to keepe Saint Georges feast: at whych feast the Duke of Norfolke was President: MarginaliaTestwood complained of, to the olde Duke of Northfolke.vnto whō the Deane and Canons made a greeuous complaynt on Testwod. Who being called before the Duke, hee shooke him vp and all to reuiled him, as thoughe hee would haue sent him to hanging by and by. Yet neuertheles Testwod so behaued him selfe to the Duke, that in the end he let him go, without any farther molesting of him, to the great discomfort of the Deane and Canons. Here haue ye hearde the causes which moued Testwods enemies to seeke his destruction, and could not attaine their purpose, till that wicked Aman 

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This is a reference from the Old Testament book of Esther. Haman is the evil counsellor of the Persian emperor who sought to have the Jews massacred.

Doctour London came, as shall be shewed in the processe following.

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¶ The originall of Henry Filmers trouble.

MarginaliaFilmers trouble beginneth.ABout the yeare of our Lord. 1541. after all the orders of supersticions and begging Friers were suppressed and put downe, there chaunced one MarginaliaFryer Melster Vicar of Windsore.sir Thomas Melster, which had bene a Frier before, & chaunged hys Friers coate (but not his Friers hart) to bee Vicar of Wyndesore. This Priest on a time made a Sermon to his Parishioners, in the which he declared so many fond and frierish tales, MarginaliaOur Lady spouting milke in S. Bernards eies.as that our lady should hold out her brestes to Saint Barnard, and spoute her mylke in to his eyes 

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The reference is to St Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153); the story of the Virgin Mary squirting her milk into his eyes was a well-known legend.

, with such like festiuall tales, that many honest men were offended therewith, and specially this Henry Filmer then one of the Church Wardens: who was so zealous to gods word, that he could not abide to heare the glorye of Christ so defaced wyth superstitious fables. Whereupon he tooke an honest man or two with him, and went to the Priest, wyth whom he talked so honestly and so charitablye, that in the end the Priest gaue him harty thankes, and was content at his gentle admonition, to reforme him selfe without any more adoe, and so departed friendlye the one from the other.

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Now was there one in the towne, called Wylliam Simons a Lawyer (as is aforesayd) who hearing that Filmer had bene with the Priest, and reproued hym for hys Sermon, tooke pepper in þe nose 

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William Simonds (or Symonds), was a very influential figure, being at various times MP and also mayor of Windsor.

, and gat him to the Vicar, and did so animate him in hys doinges, that he slipped quite away from the promise hee had made to Filmer, and followed the mynde of Simons: MarginaliaSymons the Lawyer against Filmer.who meeting wyth Filmer afterward, all to reuiled hym, saying he would bring him before the Bishop, to teach him to be so malaperte. Then Filmer hearing the matter renued, which hee had thought had bene suppressed, stoode against Simons and sayd, that the Vicar had preached false and vnsound doctrine, and so would he say to the Bishop, whensoeuer he came before him. Then Symons slept not the matter, but went to the Maior, and procured of hym and hys brethren a letter, signed with their own handes, in the Priestes fauour as much as could be deuised, MarginaliaSymons cōplaineth of Filmer to Doctor Capon Byshop of Sarum.and so prepared him selfe with other his friends to go to the bishop 
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John Salcot, alias Capon, was the bishop of Bangor from 1534-9. Owing to the poverty of this see, he was allowed to retain the abbacy of Hyde. This meant that while bishop of Bangor, Salcot was actually living in Winchester diocese, not far from Windsor. He was being consulted because he was a bishop in the vicinity, but he had no formal jurisdiction over either the town or castle of Windsor. Filmer's encounter with Salcot must have taken place before Salcot was made bishop of Salisbury in 1539.

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(whose name was Doctor Capon) & to take the Priest wyth them: which was a paynfull iourney for the seely 
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This word is being used with its sixteenth-century meaning of 'blameless'.

poore man, by reason he had a very sore leg.

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Now Filmer hearyng how Symons went about to put him to a foyle, cōsulted with hys frendes what was best to do: who concluded to drawe out certayne notes of the Vicares Sermon, and to prepare them selues to be at Salisbury as soone as Symons, or before him, if it might bee possible. Thus both the parties beyng in a readynes, it chaunced them to set forth of Wyndsore all in one day. But by reason the Priest (beyng an impotent 

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I.e., weak, debilitated.

man) could not endure to ryde very fast, MarginaliaFilmer forced to cōplaine to the B. of Sarum.Filmer and his company gat to the towne an houre and more before Symons, and went to the Bishop and deliuered vp their byll vnto hym. Which byll when the Byshop

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had
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