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1438 [1438]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Windsore. Testwood, Filmer, Person, Marbecke, Bennet.

had red the contentes thereof, he called for the man that brought it. Come Syrha, quoth he, you can tel me more by mouth, then the letter specifieth, and had him in to a litle garden. Now, quoth the Bishop, what saye you to me? Forsooth my Lord, quoth he, I haue nothing to say vnto your Lordship, for I did not bring the letter to the towne. No quoth the Bishop, where is he that brought it? Forsooth my Lorde quoth he, I left him busye at his lodging. Then he will come, quoth the bishop. Bid him be with me betimes in the morning. I will, quoth hee, do your Lordships commaundement, and so he departed home to his lodging. And when his kinsfolkes saw him come in, alas cosyn, quoth they, we are al vndone. Why so, quoth he, what is the matter? MarginaliaBennets man searched for at Oking.Oh said they, here hath bene since you went, maister Padget the kinges Secretarie, with Syr Tho. Cardine of the priuye Chamber, and searched all our house, for one that shoulde come to the towne with Ockam: therefore make shift for your selfe as soone as you can. Is that all the matter, quoth hee? then content your selfe, for I will neuer flee one foote, hap what hap will. And as they were thus reasoning together, in came the foresaid Searchers againe, and whē maister Cardine saw Bennets mā, he knew him very well, and said: was it thou that came to the towne with Ockam? Yea Syr, quoth he. Now who the deuill (quoth maister Cardine) brought thee in companie with that false knaue? Then he told them his busines, and the cause of his cōming: which being knowen, they were satisfied, and so departed. MarginaliaBennet discharged out of prison by good men of the priuie chamber.The next daye had Bennets man a discharge for his maister (procured by certaine of the priuie Chamber) and so went home.

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MarginaliaCertayne of the priuie chamber indited.Now was Ockam all this while at my Lord priuie Seales, where he was kept secrete, till certayne of the Counsaile had perused all his writinges, amonge the which they found certaine of the priuie Chamber indited, with other the kinges Officers, with their wiues 

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This list shows the intention of London, Simonds and, very probably, Stephen Gardiner to go after courtiers suspected of heresy. Philip (not William) Hoby and Sir Thomas Carden were gentlemen ushers of the Privy Chamber, with constant access to the king. Thomas Weldon was a master of the Royal Household and Snowball had the delicate and trusted position of yeoman chef for the king's mouth.

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, that is to say, MarginaliaSyr Thomas Cardyne, and hys wife.
Syr Philip Hobby, and hys wife.
M. Edmund Harman.
M. Thomas Weldone.
Snowball, and his wife.
All these were indited for the vj. Articles, with a great number moe.
Syr Tho. Cardine, Syr Philip Hobby, with both their Ladies. Maister Edmund Harman, M. Thomas Weldone, with Snowball & his wife. All these they had indited by the force of the. vj. Articles, as ayders, helpers, and maintainers of Anthony Person. And beside them, they had indited of heresie (some for one thing, and some for an other) a great nomber moe of the kinges true and faithfull subiectes. MarginaliaThe kyng gaue hys pardon to hys gentlemen of hys priuie chamber.Whereof the kinges Maiestie being certefied, his grace of his speciall goodnes (with out the sute of any man) gaue to the foresaid gentlemen of his priuie chamber, and other his seruantes with their wiues, his gracious pardon. And, as God would haue the matter further knowen vnto his maiestie, as he roade one day a hunting in Gylforde Parke, and sawe the Shiriffe with Syr Hūfrey Foster sitting on their horse backes together, hee called thē vnto him, and asked of them, how his lawes was executed at Windesore: MarginaliaThe king certified of the pitifull death of these godly Martyrs of Windsore.Then they beseching his grace of pardon, told him plainly, that in all their liues they neuer sat on matter vnder his Graces authoritie, that went so much against their consciences, as the death of these men did, & vp & told his Grace so pitifull a tale of the casting away of these poore men, þt the king turning his horsehead to depart frō thē, sayd: MarginaliaThe kinges testimonye of the Martyrs of Windsore.Alas poore Innocents.

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MarginaliaThe Byshop of Winchester out of the kynges fauour.After this, the king withdrew his fauour from the Bishop of Winchester, and being more and more enformed of the conspiracie of doctor London and Symons, be commaunded certaine of his Counsaile, to search out the ground thereof. MarginaliaD. London, W. Symons, & R. Ockam, apprehended and condemned of periurye.Whereupon doctor London and Symons were apprehended & brought before þe Coūsail, and examined vpon their oth of allegiance. And for denying their mischeuous and traiterous purpose, which was manifestlye proued to their faces, they were both periured, and in fine, adiudged as periured persons, to weare papers in Wyndsore, & Ockam to stand vpō the pillery in the towne of Newbery, where he was borne.

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The iudgement of all these three was to ride about MarginaliaThe punishment of D. London, of W. Symons, and of Rob. Ockam, for false accusation and periurye.Wyndesore, Reading, and Newbery, with papers on their heades, and their faces turned to the horse tayles, & so to stand vpō þe Pillerie in euery of these townes, for false accusation of þe forenamed Martyrs, & for periurie.

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And thus muche touching the persecution of these good Saintes of Wyndesore, according to the copie of their own Actes, MarginaliaEx testimonio Ioan. Marbecki.receaued and written by Iohn Marbecke, who is yet a liue, both a present witnes, and also was then a partie of the sayde doinges, and can testifie the truth thereof. 

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This is an important indication that Marbeck himself was the source of this narrative.

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¶ Aunswere to the cauilling aduersaryes touchyng Iohn Marbecke.

WHerefore against 

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This concluding section to the narrative of the Windsor martyrs was Foxe's response to the charge made by Nicholas Harpsfield that Foxe had erroneously identified Marbeck as a martyr, and to the implication, rapidly taken up by other Catholic writers, that this demonstrated Foxe's inaccuracy.

these crooked cauillers, which make so much adoe against my former booke, because in a certaine place I chaunced to say that Bennet and Finmore had their pardon (whē in deede it was Bennet & Marbecke) MarginaliaThe story doth purge it selfe, if it had pleased these men to take one place with an other.be it therfore knowē, protested, denounced, & notified, to all and singular suche carpers, wranglers, exclamers, deprauers, with the whole broode of all such whisperers, railers, quarelpickers, cornercreepers, faultfinders, and spidercatchers, or by what name els so euer they are to be titled, that here I openly say, affirme, professe, hold, maintain and write, the same as I sayd and wrote before in the latter castigations of my booke: MarginaliaMarke you wranglers and bee satisfied.that is, that Iohn Marbecke was with the other condemned, but not burned, cast by the law, but by pardon saued, appointed with the rest to dye, and yet not dead, but lyueth (God be praised) and yet to this present day singeth merely, and playeth on the Organs, not as a dead mā, amongest Foxes Martyrs (as it hath pleased some in the court to counter against me) but as one witnessed and testefied truly in the booke of Foxes Martyrs to be a liue 
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Foxe is closely paraphrasing Harpsfield's criticism of his error in confusing Marbeck and Filmer (see DS, pp. 962-3).

. And therefore suche maner of persons, if the disposition of their nature be such, that they must needes find faults, then let them finde them where they are, and where those faultes by their finding maye be corrected. But where as they bee corrected alreadye, and found to their handes, and also amended before, let then these Legendliers looke on their owne Legendes, and there cry out of lyes, where they may finde enowe, and cease their biting there, where they haue no iuste cause to barke.

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And admitte, that I had not foreseene & corrected thys escape before, touching þe matter of Ioh. Marbecke, but that the place still had remayned in the booke, as it was, that is, that the sayd Ioh. Marbecke, which is yet aliue, had then died & suffered with þe other 3. the same time at Windsore: yet what gentle or courtuous reader, could haue therin any iuste matter to triumphe and insult against me, seing the iudiciall actes, the recordes, & registers, yea and the Bishops certificate, & also the writte of execution remayning yet in recorde, sent to the king, did lead me so to saye & thinke? 

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This is an important indication that Foxe based his account of the Windsor martyrs partly on documents that must have been sent to him during his exile. It should also be remembered that, for all of Foxe's protesting, he disregarded what Hall (or, more accurately, Richard Grafton) wrote about the incident. And that he only caught his mistake while the first edition was being printed, and his correction was made in a place where it was easy for Harpsfield to overlook.

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For what man writing histories, who can not be in all places, to see all thinges, but following hys recordes & registers, wherin he seeth the sayd Marbecke to be iudged and condemned with the rest, would otherwyse write or thinke, but that also he was executed and burned in the same companye?

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MarginaliaThe death of Ioh. Marbecke in the former boke amēded.But nowe I correcte and reforme the same agayne, and first of all other, I finde the fault, and yet am I found fault withall. I correct my selfe, and yet am I corrected of other. I warne the Reader of the truth, and yet am I a lyer. The booke it selfe sheweth the escape, and biddeth in sted of 4. to read 3. burned, & yet is the booke made a Legend of lyes. Brieflye, where I preuent all occasion of cauilling to the vttermost of my diligence, yet cā not I haue that law, which all other bookes haue, that is, to recognise & reforme myne own errata.

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Wherefore to conclude, these men, whosoeuer they are, if they will be satisfied, I haue sayd enough: if they will not, what soeuer I can say, it will not serue, and so I leaue them: I would I could better satisfie them. God himselfe amende them.

¶ The
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