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1440 [1440]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, with others.

And thus he continued a while readyng in the chapter house of the White Frieres, but the place beyng not bygge enough, he was desired to read in the pulpit, and so procedyng in his Lectures (wherin he declared how the world was deceaued by the Romane Byshoppes, whiche had set forth the damnable doctrine of transubstantiation and the reall presence in the Sacramēt, as is aforesayd) MarginaliaThe idolatrous pageāt of the resurrection most sumptuously pictured out at Calyce.he came at length to speake against the pageāt or picture set forth of the resurrection which was in S. Nicolas Churche, declaryng the same to bee but mere Idolatrie, and illusion of the Frenchmen before Calyce was Englishe.

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MarginaliaCommissiō sent frō the kyng to search out the false iuggling of thys Idolatrye at Calice.Vppon whiche Sermon or Lecture, there came a Commission from the kyng to the Lorde Deputie, M. Grendfield, Syr Iohn Butler Commissarie, the kynges Mason, and Smyth, with others, that they shoulde search whether there were (as was put in writyng, and vnder bull and pardon) three hostes lying vpon a Marble stone be sprinkled with bloud, and if they found it not so, that immediatly it should be plucked down, and so it was. MarginaliaThe false iugglinges of the Papistes espyed.For in searchyng therof, as they brake vp a stone in a corner of the Tumbe, they instead of the iij. hostes, found souldered in the Crosse of Marble lying vnder the Sepulcher, Marginalia3. painted counters in stead of 3. hostes.iij. playne white counters which they had painted like vnto hostes, and a bone that is in the tip of a sheepes taile. All which trūperie Damlyp shewed vnto the people the next day folowyng, which was Sonday, out of the pulpit, and after that they were sent by the Lord Deputie to þe kyng.

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Notwithstandyng the deuill stirred vp a Doue (hee might well be called a Cormorant) þe Prior of þe White Friers. 

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Foxe's fondness for a pun is a little confusing here; John Dove, was the prior of the Carmelites (Whitefriars) in Calais. Dove was a religious conservative and an ally of Lord Lisle.

Who with Syr Gregory Buttoll Chapleine to þe Lord Lisle, began to barke agaynst hym. Yet after the sayd Adam had in three or foure Sermons confuted the sayd Friers erroneous doctrine of transubstantiation, and of the propitiatorie Sacrifice of the Masse: MarginaliaIoh. Doue Fryer, peacher of Damlip.the sayd Frier outwardly semed to geue place, ceasing openly to inuey, and secretlye practised to peach him by letters sent vnto the Clergie here in England: MarginaliaDamlip sent for to appeare before the Counsell in England.so that within viij. or x. dayes after, the sayd Damlyp was sent for to appeare before the Byshop of Canterbury, with whom was assistant Ste. Gardiner, Byshop of Wynchester, D. Sampson Byshop of Chichester and diuers other, before whom he most cōstantly affirmed and defended the doctrine whiche he had taught, in such sorte aunswering, confuting, and soluting the obiections, as his aduersaries, yea euen among other, þe learned, godly and blessed Martyr Cranmer then yet but a Lutheran, marueiled at it, and sayd plainly that þe Scripture knew no such terme of transubstantiation. MarginaliaDamlip threatned by the Byshops.Then begā the other Byshops to threaten him, shortly to confute him with there accustomed argument, I meane fire and Fagot, if he should still stand to the defence of that hee had spoken. Wherunto he constantly aunswered that hee would the next day deliuer vnto them fully so much in writyng as he had sayd: wherto also hee would stand, and so was dismissed.

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MarginaliaDamlip secretlye warned to voyde.The next day at the houre appointed to appeare, when they looked surely to haue apprehended him, in the meane season he had secret intimation from the B. of Canterbury, that if hee did any more personally appeare, he should be committed vnto warde, not like to escape death. Wherupō he (playing in deede then Adams part, for such is man, left in his own hādes) had him cōmended vnto thē & sent thē iiij. sheetes of paper learnedly written in the Latine toūge, his faith with his argumentes, conferēces, the Scriptures, and allegations of the Doctours, by or . Which done, hee hauing a litle money giuen him in his purse by hys frendes, stepped and went to the West countrey, and there , while great trouble kindled agaynst people in Calyce, vppon the time, as ye shall , the pag. 

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In the passages above, Foxe is presenting a simplified view of a complex series of events. John Butler, Cranmer's commissary, attempted to rescue Damplip by having summoned back to Lambeth for examination by Cranmer. In the meantime, Thomas Cromwell weighed in on Damplip's side. Dove was grilled thoroughly about his actions and Cromwell sent Lisle a blistering reprimand. However, the accusations of sacramentarian heresy clearly alarmed the king. Cromwell had to open an investigation of sacramentarians in Calais and Lisle was able to force a second hearing for Damplip. It was this second hearing that Damplip fled. (For the outline of these events see A. J. Slavin, 'Cromwell, Cranmer and Lord Lisle, a study in the politics of reform', Albion 9 [1977], pp. 325-33 and Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], pp. 218-19).

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After hys departure, þe kynges Maiestie was aduer-tised that there was great dissension & diuersitie of pernicious opinions in hys sayd towne of Calyce, greatly tendyng to the daunger of the same. Wherupō, duryng yet the dayes of the Lorde Cromwell, MarginaliaD. Champion & M. Garret, sent to preach at Calyce.were sent ouer D. Champion, Doctor of Diuinitie, & M. Garret 

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I.e., the martyr Thomas Garrett. This, however, was not a commission; Champion and Garrett were sent to preach in Calais and, in fact, Garrett was appointed to the living of St. Peter's just outside the town.

who after was burned, two godly & learned men, to preach and instruct the people and to confute all pernicious errours, who in effect preached & mainteined the same true doctrine whiche Adam Damlyp had before set fourth, and by reason thereof, they left the towne at their departure very quyet, and greatly purged of the sclaunder that had runne on it. After þe departure of the sayd Champion and Garret, MarginaliaSyr W. Smith Curate, and a zelous preacher at Calice.one Syr W. Smith Curate of our Lady Parish in Calyce, a man very zelous, though but meanely learned, did begyn to preache and earnestly to inuey agaynst Papistrie and wilfull ignoraūce: exhortyng men obediētly to receaue the worde, and no longer to contemne the same, lest Gods heuie plages and wrath should fall vppon them, whiche alwayes foloweth the contempt of his holy word.

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Which Sir W. Smith, for that sometime he would be very feruent & zelous, sharply inueying agaynst the despisers of the word, was moued by some of the Coūsell there, who would seme to fauour Gods word, that he should not be so earnest agaynst them that yet could not away with the same, willyng him to beare with such, for by bearyng with them they might happe to be wonne. Well well, sayd the same Smith (openly in the pulpit one day as hee preached) some men say I am to earnest, and wil me to beare with such as continue opē enemies against Christes holy Gospel, and refuse, nay forbid that any should read þe Bible or holy Scripture within their house: but let all such take heede, for before God, I feare that God for their contemning of his worde, will not long beare with thē, but make them in such case as some of them shal not haue a head left them vppon their shoulders to beare vp their cap withall: which 

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This account of Sir Nicholas Carew's repentance at his death was dropped from the second edition; almost certainly because Foxe learned that it was demonstrably untrue. Carew apparently died a staunch Catholic. Foxe took this account, word-for-word, from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke, (London, 1550), STC 12734a, fo.233r.

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also after came to passe.

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This Smith continued in the diligent bestowyng of his talent there, till shortly after the deuill got such hold in the hartes of a number of Gods enemies, that hee with diuers other godlymen were called ouer into England, and charged with erroneous opinions worthy of great punishmēt, as hereafter more at large shall appeare.

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First the Lord Lisle the kinges deputy there, whom we shewed to be the maintainer of Damlip MarginaliaThe L. Lisle base sonne to K. Edward the fourth. (all be it he were him selfe of a most gentle nature and of right nobole bloud, the base sonne of that noble Prince kyng Edward the fourth) being fiercely set on, & incessantly entised by the wicked Ladye Honor his wyfe, who was an vtter enemy to Gods honor, and in idolatrye, hipocrisie, and pride incomparably euyll, she being daily and hourly thereunto incited and prouoked by MarginaliaSyr Thomas Palmer.Sir Thomas Palmer knight, and MarginaliaM. Rookwoode.Iohn Rookwoode Esquire, two enemies to Gods woorde, beginning now to floorish at Calice: 

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Actually Lord Lisle was a religious conservative and needed no goading from his wife or anyone else to move against Damplip, Broke, Butler and the others.

these I say, with certayne other of the Counsell of the sayd towne of Calice, to the nomber of vij. mo beside them selues, seking occasion or rather a quarell, where no iust cause was geuen, MarginaliaThe Counsell of Calice letters agaynst the Protestantes.began to write very heynous letters and greuous complaintes vnto the Lordes of the priuy Coūcel, against diuers of þe towne of Calice, affirming that they were horribly infected with heresies and pernicious opinions: As first the foresayd Adam Damlip, who though he were for a time escaped their hands, yet stacke styll in their remembraunce from time to time, vntill at last the innocent man was cruelly put to death as a traytour, as hereafter shall appeare.

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Also, besides this Damlip, they complained of Thomas Broke, Rafe Hare, likewise of Sir Iohn Butler then Cōmissarie, & Syr W. Smith, Iames Cocke, aliâs Coppen de Hane, Iames Barber and other, and the names of them all sent ouer. Of the which persōs, first the sayd Thomas Broke, and Rafe Hare, Cop-

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