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1441 [1441]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, with others.

pen de Hane, and Iames Barber were apprehended and sent ouer, and committed to prison in Westminster gate, and then commaunded to appeare before the Archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Winchester, the bishop of Chichester, and ten other appointed by the kinges Maiesties commission, for the examination of them. 

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This was in May 1539.

And their accusers also were sent ouer with letters from the Councell there, vnto his priuie Councell here, in the furtheraunce of their malicious sutes against those honest men, with certain speciall letters directed vnto the Lorde Fitzwilliams then Earle of Southhampton, and great Admirall of England, to the Lord Sandes, Lord Chamberlayne of the Houshold, likewyse also to Sir Williā Kingstone knight, Comptroller of þe Houshold, & to D. Sampson, then bishop of Chichester, & other, tending all to one effect, that is to say, to the vtter destruction of these godly men, if God (after his wonted maner) had not mightely preserued them, and, as it were, ouershadowed thē with the winges of his mercy.

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MarginaliaThe trouble of Rafe Hare, souldiour of Calyce.That the same may the better appeare, you shal vnderstand that first Rafe Hare, a man rude and so vnlearned, that scarce he could reade, yet through Gods grace, was very zealous, 

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Ralph Hare was a soldier in the Calais garrison.

and therwith lead so godlye and temperate a life, as not one of his enemies coulde accuse or blame the same his sober life and conuersation. MarginaliaRafe Hare charged.This Rafe Hare was charged to be one, that had spoken against auricular confession, against holye bread and holy water, yea and beside that, he was one which would not lightly sweare an oth, nor vse almost anye maner of pastime, nor good fellowship, as they terme it, but was alwaies in a corner by him selfe, looking on his booke. The poore simple man being charged by the Cōmissioners, that he was a naughty man and erroneous, and that he could not be otherwise, cōming out of a towne so infected with pernicious errours & sectes as that was, was wylled by thē to take good heede to him selfe, lest through obstinacie hee turned his erroneous opinions to plaine heresie: for an errour defended, is heresie.

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MarginaliaThe aūswr of Rafe Hare.My good Lordes sayd the poore man, I take God to recorde, I woulde not willinglye maintaine an errour or heresie, wherefore I beseche you let my accusers come face to face before me. For if they charge me with that which I haue spoken, I will neuer denye it. Moreouer, if it be truth, I will stand vnto it, and otherwise if it be an errour, I will with all my hart vtterlye forsake it, I meane if it be against Gods holye word. For the Lord is my wytnes, I seeke, and daylye pray to God, that I may know the truth, and flee from all errours, and I trust the Lord will saue me and preserue me from them.

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Aha, quoth the bishop of Winchester, doo you not heare what he sayth my Lord? I perceiue nowe thou art a naughty fellow. Alas my Lord, said Rafe Hare, what euyll sayd I? MarginaliaWinchesters cauillation about the Lord, & our Lorde.Mary Sir, you sayd the Lord, the Lord, and that is Symbolum hœreticorū, said Winchester. What is that my lord, for Gods sake tell me, sayd Hare? Thou art nought, thou art nought said he. At which woordes the simple man began to tremble, and seemed much dismayde and driuen into a greater agonye and feare. Which thing Winchester well perceiuing, said vnto him: Rafe Hare, Rafe Hare, by my trouth I pitie thee muche. For in good faith I thinke thee to be a good simple man, & of thy selfe wouldest meane wel enough, but that thou hast had shrewed and subtile scholemaisters, that haue seduced thee, good poore simple soule, & therfore I pitie thee: and it were in deede pitie that thou shouldest be burnt, for thou art a good fellow, , and hast serued the king right well in hys warres. 

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Ralph Hare was a soldier in the Calais garrison.

I haue heard thee well cōmended, and thou art yet able to do the king as good seruice as euer thou wast, and we all will be a meane to his grace to bee good and gracious Lorde vnto thee, if wylt take pitie of thy selfe, and leaue thy errours. For I dare saye for vs all, that bee Commissioners, that wee would be lothe that thou shouldest be cast away. For alas poore simple man, we perceiue thou hast bene seduced (I say) by others.

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How sayest thou therefore? thou knowest my lorde of Canterburies grace here is a good gentle lord, and would be lothe thou should be cast away. Tel me, canst thou be content to submit thy selfe vnto him, & to stand vnto such order, as he and we shal take in this matter? How sayest thou man? speake. The poore man therwith falling vpon his knees, and sheeding teares, aunswered, speaking to the Archb. of Canterbury in thys wise: My good lord, for Christes sake be good vnto me, and I referre my selfe vnto your graces order, do with me what you please.

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The bishop of Canterbury, considering what daunger he was ready to fall in, & pitying the same (though the simplicitie of the man was so great, that he perceyued it not) sayd, MarginaliaThe wordes of the Archb. of Cant. to Hare.nay Rafe Hare, stand vp, and aduise thy selfe, and commit not thy selfe to me, for I am but one man, and in Commission but as the other are, so that it lyeth in me to do nothing. But if thou do committe thy selfe vnto all, then thou committest thy selfe vnto the lawe, and the lawe is ordayned to doe euery man ryght. Goe to Raphe Hare sayd Wynchester, submit thy selfe to my Lorde and vs: it is best for thee to do so. Whereupon he fell vpon hys knees againe, and sayd: My lordes and maisters all, I submyt my selfe wholye vnto you. And therewithall a booke was holden him, and an othe geuen him to be obedient vnto them, and to all Ecclesiasticall lawes: & strayght way he was enioyned to abiure, MarginaliaPenance inioyned to Rafe Hare.and to beare a foggot, three seuerell dayes, and moreouer the poore man lost the liuing that he had at Calice.

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This simple mā hearing hys penance, pitiously lamēted, & earnestly at þe first denied to stand therunto, with pitious exclamation, saying: O my L. of Winchester, my L. of Winchester, haue you made me a logge ready to be layd vpō þe fire whē soeuer any wicked mā falsly of malice by prouocation of the deuil, shall lay any small trifle to my charge? Or shall I be thus hādled, nothing proued to my face against mee? Alas I haue alwayes hated errours and heresies. Content thy selfe Hare: there is now no remedye, thou must either doo thy penaunce, or be burnt, sayd the Commissioners. Thus haue you hearde how Rafe Hare did speede.

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MarginaliaThe examination & trouble of T. Broke.Thē was Tho. Broke called for, against whō it was obiected by some of the Coūsels letters of Calyce, that he was a seditious felow. MarginaliaAccusers of T. Broke.Amōg these accusers besides the rest, was one Richard Longe, an other Fraunces Hastinges, men of armes, who charged the forenamed Tho. Broke, and one Geffray Louedaye Esquire, for staying and mainteinyng the foresayd Adam Damlyp at Calyce: as who had promised vnto him a stipend to preach such heresies and pernicious opinions, as afterward he taught there: and that these ij. dayly gathered many seuerall summes of money, for the entertainment of the sayd Adā. MarginaliaFalse accusation.Howbeit the foresayd Hastinges failed in the proofe therof. For Loueday proued that he was viij. dayes before Damlyps commyng to Calyce, and duryng xiiij. dayes continually after hee began to to preach, abidyng at Paris, there occupied about necessary affaires of Charles Duke of Southfolke. And Broke duryng the sayd tyme was at London dayly attendāt in the Parliament house, wherof he had enowe to beare witnes, agaynst that vntrue surmise.

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MarginaliaThree other accusers against T. Broke & Geffrey Loueday.After that, came three at once against the said Broke, well armed as they thought, who had not onely consulted together before of the matter and put it in writing at Calyce, beside their conference and talke by the way kepyng company from thence hither, but also had obtained from the Lord Deputie & others of the Coūsell, speciall letters as is aforesayd: and among other, one letter vnto the bishop of Chichester, to the earnest and speedy furtheraunce of the aduauncement of theyr accusations against Broke.

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