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1445 [1445]

K. Henry. 8. Gods punishment vpon persecuters. Adam Damlip, Martyr.

God sent him life, they would shortly go home with asmuch honesty, as they came with shame.

Whilest these xiij. persecuted men lay in the Fleete 

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I.e., 28 July 1540, not 1541.

, and W. Steuens in the Tower, to wytte the xix. day of Iuly. an. 1541. the foresayd Lorde Cromwell for treason layde agaynst him, was at Tower hill beheaded, as is before specified in hys story, who made there a very Christian end. Then had the poore Calyce men great cause to feare, if they had not altogether depended on the mercyfull prouidēce of their heauēly father, whose blessed will they knew directed all thinges. But he in the middest of their depe troubles and miseries so comforted them, that euen as the daungers and troubles increased, so likewise did their consolation and ioy in him: MarginaliaMathewe de Hounde a blessed Martyr of God, burned in Flaunders.so farre forth, as Mathew de Hound one of those. xiij. who was in trouble onely for that hee heard Copen de Hall read a Chapter of þe new Testament, and was as deepe in punishment, and in banishment from his wife, children, and countrey as the rest, gotte in short tyme such instruction, that hauyng therwith a soule and conscience freighted ful of godly zeale vnto Gods glory and the true doctrine of Christ, within fewe monethes after hys deliueraunce out of the Fleete, for inueying cōstantly agaynst the wicked honoryng of Images and praying vnto Saintes departed, was cruelly in a most constant faith and patience, burned in Flaunders.

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MarginaliaThe Lorde Audeley good to the persecuted members of Christ.Nowe therfore when all hope in man was past, the right honourable Lorde Audeley, Lorde Chauncellour of England, without farther examination, discharged first the sayd xiij. that were in the Fleete, and at length two yeares after, he deliuered W. Steuens also by the kynges owne motion, out of the Tower, saying at the dischargyng of those. xiij. Sirs pray for the kyngs Maiestie. His pleasure is that you shal all be presently discharged. And though your liuynges be taken from you, yet dispayre not: God will not see you lacke. MarginaliaThe common saying of the L. Audeley concerning popishe priestes.But for Gods sake Sirs beware how you deale with Popish Priestes: for, so God saue my soule, some of thē be knaues all. Sirs sayd he, I am commaunded by the Counsell to tell you that you are discharged by vertue of the kynges generall pardon, but that pardon excepteth & forbiddeth all Sacramentaries, & the most part or all of you are called Sacramētaries. Therfore I cā not see how that pardon doth you any pleasure. But pray for the kynges highnes, for his graces pleasure is, that I should dismisse you, and so I do, and pitie you all: Farewell Sirs.

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MarginaliaCalice men dismissed.So geuing God moste hartye thankes for his mightie and mercyfull deliueryng of them, they departed, dismissed as you haue heard, being in dede in very poore estate: but not in so miserable state as all those. viij. Counsellours of Calyce were within one yeare and a halfe after. For whereas the other three Counsellours, which semed more fauourable to them: MarginaliaExample how God prospereth the fauourers and frendes to hys Gospell.to witte, the Lord Gray, Sir George Carow, and Sir Richard Grinefield whiche purged þe towne of those sclaunders that vntruly were raised vpon it, & therfore for a tyme were in their Princes hyghe displeasure: within that yeare were all iij. in greater fauour then euer they were before, & that not without the reward of xx. pound by yeare to him and to his heyres, who had least: the other viij. Councellours, vniustly chargyng them and the towne of sedition and heresie: to say, MarginaliaExample how God turneth the malice of the enemyes vpon their owne heades.the Lord Lisle, the Lord Sandes, Sir Iohn Wallop, Sir Edward Rynsley, Robert Fowler Esquire Vicetreasurer, Sir Tho. Palmer knight, called long Palmer, W. Simpson Esquire Vndermarshall, and Iohn Rockewood, were either greatlye out of their Princes fauor and in þe Tower or elswhere prisoners, either els by very desperate deathes in outward appearaūce, takē out of this world: MarginaliaExample of Gods iudgement vpon a cruell persecuter.For tediousnes I will rehearse but onely þe horrible end of þe sayd Rockewood þe chief stirrer vp of all the afflictions afore spoken of: who euen to the last breath staryng and ragyng, cried, he was vtterly dāned: and beyng willed to aske God mercy who was ready to forgeue all that asked mercy on him, hee brayd and cried out: all to late, for I haue sought maliciously the deathes of a number of the honestest men in the town, and though I so thought them in my hart, yet I did that lay in me to bring thē to an euil death: all to late therfore, all to late. Which same wordes he aunswered to one that at the departure of the xiij. in yrons towardes England sayd: Sir I neuer sawe mē of such honestie so sharply corrected, and takyng it so patiently and ioyfully: Rockewoode then fetching a friske or. ij. scoffingly aunswered: all to late. The Vndermarshall soddenly fell downe in the Counsell chamber and neuer spake woorde after, nor shewed token of remembraunce. The plages of the other also as I am crediblye informed, were litle better.

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¶ The second apprehension and Martyrdom of Adam Damlip.

MarginaliaAdam Damlip agayne apprehended.COncerning Adā Dālip, otherwise called George Bucker, ye heard before declared pag. 1401. howe he being conuented before the Bishops at Lambeth, & afterward secretly admonished, and hauing money geuen him by his friendes, to avoyde, and not to appeare againe before the Bishops: after he had sent his allegations in writing vnto them, departed into the West country, and there continued teaching a schole a certaine space, about a yeare or two 

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Damplip disappeared in April 1540, so if this statement is accurate he was apprehended in 1541 or 1542. Foxe states at the end of the next sentence that Damplip remained in prison for two years or so; since Damplip was executed in May 1543, that would seem (although chronology is not Foxe's strong suit), to place his arrest in 1541.

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. After that, the good man was agayne apprehended by þe miserable inquisition of the. vj. Articles, & brought vp to Lōdon, where he was by Ste. Gardiner cōmaunded into þe Marshalsey, & there lay þe space of other ij. yeares or therabout.

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During þe imprisonment of this George in þe Marshalsey, Ioh. Marbecke (as partly ye heard before) also was cōmitted into þe same prison, which was þe morow after Palme sonday. The maner of that time so required, that at Easter euery person must nedes come to cōfession. Wherupō Marbecke with þe rest of þe prisoners there, was enforced to come vpon Easter daye to MarginaliaGeorge Bucker confessour to the prisoners in the Marshalsey.Syr George aforesaid, to be confessed, who was then Confessour to the whole house. MarginaliaAcquaintaunce betwene Ioh. Marbecke and George Bucker, otherwise called Adam Damlip.By this occasion Ioh. Marbecke, which had neuer seene him before, entring into conference with him, perceiued what he was, what he had bene, what troubles he sustained, how long he had lyen there in prison, by whom, & wherfore: who declared moreouer his mynde to Marbecke, to the effect as foloweth: And now because (sayde hee) I thinke they haue forgotten mee, I am fullye minded to make my humble sute to þe bishop of Winchester in an Epistle, declaring therin myne obedience, humble submission and earnest desyre to come to examination. I know þe worst. I can but leese my life present, which I had leauer doo, then here to remayne, and not be suffered to vse my talent to Gods glorye. Wherefore (God wylling) I wyll surely put it in proofe.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip well beloued among the prisoners, specially of the keeper.This Damlip, for his honest & godly behauiour was beloued of all þe whole house: MarginaliaMassy keeper of the Marshalsey.but speciallye of þe keeper him self, whose name was Massy, whō he alwayes called Master: & being suffered to go at libertie within the house whether he would, he dyd much good among the common and rascall sorte of prisoners in rebuking vice and synne, and kept them in such good order and awe, that the keeper thought him selfe to haue a great treasure of hym. And no lesse also Marbecke him selfe confesseth, to haue foūd great cōfort by him. For notwithstanding the straite precepse geuen by the Bishop of Wynchester, that no man should come to him, nor he to speake with any man: yet the sayde Adam many tymes would finde the meanes to come & comfort him.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip writeth to the Bishop of Winchester.Now when he had made and drawen out hys Epistle, he deliuered the same to hys Maister the keeper, vpon Saterday in the morning, which was about the second weeke before Whytsonday following 

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Whitsunday is seven weeks after Easter, so this would have been the Saturday 5 weeks after Easter or, in 1543, 15 May. But here Foxe is incorrect, for the Privy Council ordered Damplip's execution on 22 April 1543 (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18).

, desiring him to delyuer it at þe Court to the bishop of Winchester. The keeper sayd he would, and so dyd. The Byshop, what quicke speede hee made for his dispatch, I

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