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1446 [1446]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, Martyr.

know not, but thus it fell out, as ye shall heare 

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Damplip's timing was disastrous. He brought his case to Stephen Gardiner's attention just as Gardiner's efforts to dislodge Cranmer (the so-called 'Prebendaries' Plot) were reaching full throttle. In fact, Damplip's maladroit intervention may well have triggered John Butler's re-arrest. In any case, Foxe is certainly correct in saying that events moved quickly, as Damplip contacted Gardiner after Easter (10 April in 1543) but the Privy Council ordered his execution on 22 April (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18).

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The keeper came home at night very late, and whē the prisoners (which had taried supper for his cōming) saw hym so sad and heauy, they deemed somthing to be amysse. At last the keeper casting vp hys eyes vpon Sir George, said: O George I can tel thee tidings. What is that maister, quoth he? Vpon Monday next thou and I must go to Calice. To Calice maister? what to do? I know not, quoth the keeper, MarginaliaSteuen Gardiner sendeth out a precept for the execution of Adam Damlip.and pulled out of hys purse a peece of waxe, with a litle labell of parchment hanging out thereat, which seemed to be a precept. And when Sir George sawe it, he sayd: well well maister, now I know what the matter is. What, quoth the keper? Truly maister I shall dye in Calice. Nay, quoth the keeper, I trust it be not so. Yes, yes maister, it is most true, and I prayse God for hys goodnes therin. And so the keeper & they went together to supper with heauy cheare for Sir George, as they there called him. MarginaliaThe chearfull constancie of Adam Damlip.Who notwithstāding was mery him self, & did eate his meate as well as euer he did in all hys life: In somuch that some at the boorde sayde vnto hym, that they marueiled how he could eate hys meate so well, knowyng he was so neare hys death. Ah maisters, quoth he, do you thinke that I haue bene Gods prisoner so long in the Marshalsey, and haue not yet learned to dye? Yes, yes, and I doubt not but God will strengthen me therein. Ex litteris Ioa. Marbecki.

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MarginaliaAdam Damlip brought to Calice to suffer.And so vpon Monday early in the mornyng before day, the keper with iij. other of the Knight Marshalles seruauntes, settyng out of London, conueyed the sayd Adam Damlyp vnto Calyce vpon the Ascension euē, and there committed him to the Maiors prison. 

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Damplip and Butler were ordered to be sent to Calais on 22 April 1543 (APC, 1540-47, pp. 117-18). In 1543, the eve of Ascension Day would have been 19 May.

MarginaliaI. Butler againe inprisoned, with Syr Daniell hys Curate.Vpon which day Iohn Butler the Commissary aforesaid, and Sir Daniell his Curate of S. Peters, were also cōmitted to the same prison, and commaundement geuen no man to speake with Butler.

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Vppon Saterday next 

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I.e., 22 May 1543.

was the day of execution for Damlyp. The cause whiche first they layd to hys charge, was for heresie. But because by an acte of Parlament, all such offenses done before a certaine day, were pardoned (through whiche Acte he could not bee burdened with any thyng that hee had preached or taught before) yet for the receiuyng of the foresayd French crowne of Cardinall Poole (as you heard before) he was condēned of treason, and in Calyce cruelly put to death, being drawen, hanged, and quartered. 
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The fact that Damplip was executed for treason, instead of heresy, is revealing. It may have been an early indication that the 'Prebendaries' Plot would fail and also that Butler would be released. It is also ironic that Damplip was executed on the same charge that brought down Lord Lisle and Germain Gardiner (although Foxe is unclear about this, the men were executed for alledgedly conspiring with Reginold Pole. In reality, their executions were part of the factional struggles at Court in 1543-44.).

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¶ The cruell death and Martyrdome of Damlyp.
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Adam Damplip, alias George Bucker, sometime 'great papist' and chaplain to Bishop Fisher, became a well received evangelical preacher, favoured by Lord Lisle in Calais. The authorities, however, caught up with him and he fetched up in the Marshalsea prison (thanks to Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester) and there met John Marbeck. Having been helped to escape, he was caught again a few years later (Bishop Gardiner being 'diligent' in pursuit), and condemned for treason. Foxe's woodcut portrays Damplip beneath the gallows on which he was hung. The man shown cutting his heart out , Sir Ralph Ellerker, later suffered this awful fate himself -- 'a terrible example to all bloody and merciless men'. CUL copy has blood detail plus additional flames and foliage added, as well as some metallic paint detail at the bottom, which may once have been silver.

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Adam Damlip.The day before his execution, came vnto hym one M. Mote, then person of our Ladye Church of Ca-lice, saying: your foure quarters shall bee hanged at foure partes of the towne. And where shall my head be, sayd Damlip? Vpon the Lanterne gate, sayd Mote. MarginaliaThe constant courage of Adā Damlip, not caryng for hys death.Then Damlip aunswered: Then I shall not nede to prouide for my buriall. At his death Sir Rafe Ellerker knight, then knight Marshal there, would not suffer the innocent and godly man, to declare either his faith or þe cause he dyed for, but sayd to þe executioner, dispatch þe knaue, haue done. For Sir Will. Mote appointed there to preach, declared to þe people how he had ben a sower of seditious doctrine, & albeit he was for that pardoned by þe generall pardon, MarginaliaDamlip falsly accused of treason and innocently put to death.yet he was condemned for beyng a traitor against þe king. To þe which whē Adam Damlyp would haue replied & purged him self, the foresayd Sir Rafe Ellerker, would not suffer him to speake a worde, but cōaūded hym to be had away. And so most mekely, patiently, & ioyfully, þe blessed & innocent Martyr tooke his death, Sir Rafe Ellerker saying, þt he would not away before he sawe þe traytors hart out. MarginaliaAn example of Gods iust reuengement.But shortly after þe sayd Sir Rafe Ellerker in a skirmish or road betwene the Frenchmen and vs, at Bullayne was among other slayne. MarginaliaOf the death of Syr Rafe Ellerker, read in Halles Chronicle.Whose onely death sufficed not hys enemies, but after they had stripped him starke naked, they cut of his preuy members, and cut the hart out of his body, and so left him a terrible example to all bloudy and mercyles men. For no cause was knowen, why they shewed such indignation agaynst the sayd Sir Rafe Ellerker, more thē against the rest, but that it is written: Faciens iustitias dominus & iudicia omnibus iniuria pressis.

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MarginaliaAn other trouble of Iohn Butler, and Syr Daniell hys Curate.As touchyng Iohn Butler, and Sir Daniel his Curate, imprisoned (as ye heard) þe same day with Damlyp, vppon Sonday next folowyng they were committed to Iohn Massy aforesaid, keper of the Marshalsey, & his company, and brought to the Marshalsey, where he continued and his Curate, 9. monethes and more. At laste being sore layde vnto by Sir Iohn Gage, Sir Iohn Baker, and Sir Thomas Arundell knightes, but especially by Steuen Gardiner bishop of Winchester, for the reteining of Adam Damlip, yet by frendes sollicityng the kynges highnes for him (namely Sir Leonard Musgraue, and his brother Baunster, who were bounde for his appearaunce in a thousand poūd) hee at length by great labour and long tyme, was discharged, and at last by licence permitted to returne to Calyce agayne. 

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John Butler was released, made a royal chaplain and given additional benefice (he had already held two) in Calais in September 1543. He would become commissary of Calais again under Edward VI (Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], p. 315).

MarginaliaEx scripto testimonio Caletiensium. Ex scripto testimonio Caletiensiū.

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MarginaliaW. Steuens an earnest Protestant falsly condemned for Poperye.Furthermore, as touching William Steuens aboue mentioned, who remained all this while prisoner in the Tower, the same was also condemned with Adam Damlip of treason, which was for note & crime of Poporie in lodgyng Adam Damlip, whiche came from Cardinall Poole þe traytour, in his house at the Lord Deputies commaundement. MarginaliaW. Steuens with the rest pardoned of the kyng.Notwithstandyng the kyng afterwarde vnderstandyng more of the sayd W. Steuens, how innocent he was from that crime, beyng knowen to all men to be an earnest and zelous Protestant, gaue hym his pardon, and sent him home agayne to Calice, and so lykewise all the other xiij. aboue mentioned.

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¶ The story of a poore laboryng man in Calyce.

MarginaliaA poore man burned at Calice for the right fayth of the Sacrament.BY the credible information & writyng of þe said Calyce men, whiche were then in trouble, it is reported of a certeine poore labouryng man of Calyce, who after the preachyng of Adam Damlyp, beyng in certaine company, sayd: that he would neuer beleue, that a Priest could make the Lordes body at his pleasure. Wherupon he was then accused, and also condemned by one Haruey Commissary there. Which Haruey in tyme of his iudgement inueyng agaynst hym with opprobrious wordes, sayd: that he was an hereticke, and should dye a vyle death. The poore man (whose name yet I haue not certainly learned) answering for hym selfe againe, sayd that he was no hereticke, but was in the faith of Christ. And where as thou sayest (sayde

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he)
TTT.iij.
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