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1447 [1447]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Calyce. A faythfull wife to her husband.

he) that I shall dye a vyle death: thou thy selfe shalt dye a vyler death, and that shortlye, and so it came to passe: MarginaliaA notable example of Gods iudgement vpon a bloudye persecuter.For within halfe a yeare after, the sayd Haruey was hanged, drawen, and quartered for treason, in the sayd towne of Calice. 

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Robert Harvey, Butler's replacement as commissary of Calais, was executed for treason in the spring of 1541.

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¶ An other history of one Dodde a Scottish man, burned in Calice.

MarginaliaOne Dodde burned in Calyce.AFter the burning of this poore man, there was also an other certaine scholer, counted to be a Scottish man, named Dodde, who comming out of Germany, was there taken with certain Germaine bookes about him, and being examined thereupon, and standyng constantly to the truth that he had learned, was therefore condemned to death, and there burned in the sayd towne of Calice, within the space of a yeare, or there about, after the other godly Martyr aboue mencioned.

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MarginaliaThe storye of Williā Crosbowmaker, bearyng a Billet in Calyce.And for so much as I am presentlye in hande wyth matters of Calice, I cā not passe from thence without memory of an other certayne honest man of the same township, named William Button, aliâs Crosbowmaker, although the time of this story is a litle more auncient in yeares 

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This incident must have happened before William Warham's death in August 1532.

: which story is this. William Crosbomaker a souldiour of Calice and the kinges seruaunt, being a man as some natures be, somewhat pleasantly disposed, vsed when he met with Priestes, to demaund of them certaine mery questions of pastime, as these: MarginaliaWilliā Crosbowmakers questions.Whether if a mā were sodeinly taken, and wanted an other thing, he might not without offence occupye one of the Popes pardons, in steede of a broken paper?

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An other questiō was, whether in the world might better be wanting Dogs or Priestes. And if it were aunswered that Dogges might rather be spared: to that he would reply agayn & inferre, that if there were no Dogges, we could make no moe, but if there lacked ignorant Priestes, we might soone, and too soone, make to many of them.

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It happened that in the time of D. Darley person of our Ladies church in Calice being Commissary there for Archbishop Warham, there came a blacke Frier to Calice with the Popes pardons: who for. iiij. d. would delyuer a soule out of Purgatorie. The Frier was full of Romish vertues, for what money came for pardons by day, he bought no land with it at night. Thys foresaid Williā Button, aliâs Crosbowmaker, cōming to þe pardons, & pretēding that he would deliuer his father & frēdes soules, asked if þe holy father þe pope could deliuer soules out of Purgatory. The Frier said, there is no doubt of that. MarginaliaHeresie to doubt of the Popes charitie.Why then, quoth Button, doth he not of charitye deliuer all the soules therout? Of which wordes he was accused to the Commissary: who at his appearing before the sayd Commissarye, confessed to haue asked such questions. The Commissarye beyng angry thereat, sayd: Doubtest thou thereof, thou hereticke? There was standing by a blacke Frier named Capell, an English man, who sayd to the Commissary, there is x.M. of these heretickes betwixte Graueling and Trere. Button aunswered, Maister Frier, of all mē you may keepe silence. For your coate hath ben twise cut of from the fayth. The first tyme your order was enioyned to haue your blacke coate shorter then your whyte, and for the second tyme your order must go to the furthest part of their Church, and there syng an Antheme of our Lady. MarginaliaThis Anheme the blacke Friers were inioyned to sing euery night to our Ladye, in praise of her conception. Wherof read before pag. 926.The Commissarye at these wordes chafed, calling Button hereticke, with manye other opprobrious wordes. Then sayd Button to the Commissary, if your holy father the Pope maye delyuer soules out of Purgatory, and wyll not of charitye deliuer them: then I would to God the kyng woulde make me Pope, and I woulde surelye delyuer all out without money. At these wordes the Commissarye raged, and reuiled Button exceedinglye, causing hym to beare a Billet, and procured his wages (which was vj. d. day) to be taken from him. Then went Button to the kinges maiesty, declaring all the whole matter to MarginaliaW. Crosbowmaker pardoned of the king.his Grace, who sent him to Calice againe, and gaue hym after that. viij. d. a day.

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¶ A notable example, wherein may appeare as well the despite of D. London, and other Papistes agaynst the Gospellers, as also the fidelitie of a matrone towardes her husbande.

MarginaliaThe cruell malice of D. Lōdon agaynst the Gospell.FOr so much as mention was made a litle before of D. London, we will somewhat more adde of hym, because the matter semeth neither impertinent nor vnfruitfull: to the entent it may more euidently appeare what truth & trust is to be looked for, of this cruell kind of Papistes 

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This account first appeared in Rerum, p. 143. It is taken from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (London, 1550), STC 1234a, fo. 257r.

. MarginaliaEx Edw. Hallo.This D. London was Warden of þe new Colledge in Oxford, where it happened that certaine plate was stolen and conueyed, and brought vp to London, and sold to a Goldsmith named William Calaway. MarginaliaWilliam Calaway Goldsmith of London.This Calaway was a man of good and honest name, and reputation amongest his neighbours, but specially earnest and zelous towardes the Gospel, and a great maintainer therof. He had oftentimes before bought much plate of the same man without any perill or daūger: wherfore he doubted the lesse of his fidelitie.

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At the last the principall MarginaliaThis principall was a Chaplein of the sayd Colledge.of the theft beyng takē, and the Goldsmith also that was the byer beyng knowen, D. London, when he vnderstode hym to be a fauourer of the Gospel, wherof he was an extreme aduersarie, began straight wayes to be in a rage, and to sweare great and deepe othes, that hee would spare neither labour nor cost, but would bryng the Goldsmith to the gallowes, althoughe it should cost him fiue hendred pound. To be short, this good Goldsmith was araigned as accessary, and an action of felonie brought agaynst him. He contrarywise alledged that they ought not to procede against him, the principall being aliue. D. London on the contrary part, affirmed that the principall was hanged: which was most false, for he was one of the same Colledge, and was alyue and but lately set at libertie. To be brief he beyng found giltie, the iudge asked him what hee could alledge, why hee should not dye. MarginaliaCalaway claimeth the priuiledge of his booke.He required to haue the priuiledge of his boke, according to the auncient custome and maner. But here it was obiected agaynst him that he was Bigamus, MarginaliaBigamus, that is, a man that hath had 2. wiues. and therefore he might not haue his booke by the law, notwithstandyng that he neuer had ij. wyues, but because his wife had two husbandes, it was imputed to him for Bigamia.

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Thus this good Goldsmith beyng secluded from all hope of life, by þe craftye spite of hys malignant aduersaries: MarginaliaA singular example of a faythfull wife toward her husband.his wife beyng a woman of proued honesty and good fame, came in before the iudges, and perceyuyng her former Mariage to bee hurtefull vnto her husband, to saue her husbandes life, she tooke an othe before the iudges, that she was not Bigama, and that she was neuer maryed to mo men then to the sayd Goldsmith: and although she had children by her other husband and continued diuers yeares with him, yet she sware that she was neuer maried vnto him. MarginaliaTrue loue betwen mā and wife.Thus this woman by defamyng of her self to her great prayse, & singular example of loue 

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This clause was added to the account by Foxe.

, deliuered her innocent husband: thinkyng it better for her to liue with ignominie & reproche, then for her husband to dye, lesse estemyng þe losse of her good name, thē of hys lyfe. Ed. Ed. Hallo.

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MarginaliaCase of periurie.As touchyng 

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This paragraph, drawing moral lessons from the episode, was added by Foxe.

the qualitie of this facte or periurie, intermedle not here to discusse, but leaue it at large to the iudgement of Lawyers to define vpon. Truth it is that periurie neither in mā nor in womā is to be commēded, neither ought to be defended. But yet the true hart & faithful loue betwen thys mā & hys wife, coūterpeasing agayne as much or more on the other side, the more rare and straūge I see it in many couples now a dayes, the more I thinke it woorthy not only to be praysed, but also for example sake to be notified. But in the meane time, what shall we say to these Priestes and aduersaryes, who in such sorte violently doe presse and

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