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1609 [1547]

Queene Mary. A Parlament. Masse. Conuocation. Disputation.

Marginalia1553.from the Sermon, order was taken by the Maior, that the auncients of all companies should bee present, lest þe Preacher should be discouraged by his smal auditory.

MarginaliaSeptēb. 5.About the fift day of September the same yeare Peter Martyr came to London from Oxford, where for a time he had bene commaunded to keepe hys house, and found there the Archbishop of Canterbury, MarginaliaCranmer offereth to defend the doctrine of the seruice booke in English.who offred to defend the doctrine of the booke of common prayer, both by the Scriptures and Doctors, assisted by Peter Martyr and a fewe other, as hereafter ye shall heare. But whilest they were in hope to come to disputatiōs, the Archbishop and other were imprisoned, but Peter Martyr was suffered to returne whence he came. 

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The entry for 5 September, concerning Peter Martyr, first appears in the 1563 edition and was taken from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff1v with 1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; 1583, p. 1397 [recte 1409]).

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MarginaliaOctob. 1.The first day of October Quene Mary was crowned at Westminster: MarginaliaQ. Mary crowned. and the tenth day of the said moneth of October MarginaliaOctob. 10. then folowing, began the Parliament wyth a solemne Masse of the holy Ghost, MarginaliaThe Parlament beginneth with a Masse. after the popish maner, celebrated with great pompe in the Palace of Westminster. To the which Masse among the other Lordes, according to the maner, should come the Byshops, which yet remayned vndeposed, which were the Archbishop of Yorke, Doctor Taylour bishop of Lyncolne, Iohn Harley bishop of Herford. Of the bishops, MarginaliaTwo Byshops withdrew them selues from the sight of the Masse.Doctor Taylor and maister Harley presenting them selues according to their duty, and taking their place a mongest the Lords, after they saw the Masse beginne, not abiding the sight thereof, withdrewe them selues from the company: for the which cause the bishop of Lincolne, being examined and protesting hys fayth, was vpon the same commaunded to attende: who not long after at Ankerwicke by sickenes departed. 

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In the 1563 edition (p. 905), Foxe reports that John Taylor, the Bishop of Lincoln, was sent to the Tower after refusing to attend mass at the opening of Parliament. In subsequent editions (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339 and 1583, p. 1410) Foxe corrected this to say that Taylor was commanded to attend and died soon afterwards at Ankerwicke (in Sir Thomas Smith's house, although Foxe does not say so). This is a good example of the detailed correction of the first edition from well informed oral sources.

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MarginaliaMaister Harley Bishop of Hereford put out of hys Byshopricke. Maister Harley because he was maried, was excluded both from the Parliament, and from his bishopricke.

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Masse being done, the Queene accompanied wyth the Estates of the Realme, was brought into the Parlamēt house, there according to þe maner, to enter & begin the cōsultation. At which cōsultation or Parlamēt were repealed MarginaliaStatutes of Premunire and other repealed.all statutes made in time of king Henry the eight for premunire, and Statutes made in Kyng Edward the sixtes time for administration of common prayer and the sacraments in the English tonge: and further, the attainder of the Duke of Northumberlād was by thys Parliament confirmed. MarginaliaAltars and Masses erected.In thys meane while many men were forward in the erecting of aulters and Mases in churches. And such as would sticke to the lawes made in king Edwardes tyme till other should be established: some of them were marked, and some presently apprehēded. Among whom MarginaliaSir Iames Hales knight.Sir Iames Hales a knight of Kent and Iustice of the cōmon place was one, who notwithstanding hee had ventured hys lyfe in Queene Maries cause, in that he would not subscribe to the dishereting of her by the kinges wyll, MarginaliaThe trouble of Iudge Hales.yet for that he did at a quarter Sessions geue charge vpon the statutes made in the time of Henry. VIII. and Edward. VI. for þe supremacie & religion, he was imprisoned in the Marshalsey, Counter, and Fleete, and so cruelly handled, MarginaliaA subtile policie.and put in feare by talke that the Warden of the Fleete vsed to haue in his hearing, of such torments as were in preparing for Heretickes (or for what other cause God knoweth) that he sought to ryd him selfe out of this lyfe by wounding him selfe with a knife: and afterward was contented to say as they willed him: whereupon hee was discharged, but after that hee neuer rested tyll he had drowned him selfe in a riuer halfe a mile frō his house in Kent. 

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The material on the repeal of the Henrician and Edwardian religious statutes and the story of Judge Hales is taken entirely from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff2r with 1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339-40; 1583, p. 1410).

Of whom more is to be seene when you come to hys story. 
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Foxe would later (in Book 11) repeat the story of Hales at greater length, drawing upon other sources.

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Duryng the tyme of this Parliament, the Clergye likewise, after theyr woonted maner, had MarginaliaA Conuocation begonne.a conuocatiō, with a disputation also appointed by the Queenes commaundement, at Paules Church in London the same time, which was about the. xviij. of October. In the which conuocation, fyrst M. Ioh. Harpsfield Bacheler of Diuinity made a Sermon ad Clerum, the xvj. of October. After the Sermon done, it was assigned

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by the Bishops, that they of the Clergie house for auoiding confusion of wordes, shoulde chuse them a Prolocutor. To the whych roume and office by common assent was named Doctor Weston Deane of Westminster, and presented to the Bishops wyth MarginaliaOrations of M. Pie and M. Wymsley, of Doct. Weston and of B. Boner, in the Conuocation house.an oration of Maister Pie, Deane of Chichester, & also of M. Wymbysley Archdeacon of London. Whych Doctor Weston being chosē and brought vnto the Bishops, made hys gratulatory oration to the house, wyth þe aunswere agayne of Bishop Boner.

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After these things thus sped in þe Conuocation house, they proceeded next to the disputatiō appointed as is aboue sayd, by þe Quenes cōmaundement, about þe matter of the sacrament. Which disputation continued vj. daies. Wherin D. Weston was chief on þe Popes part, who behaued him selfe outragiously in tauntyng and checking. In conclusion, such as disputed on the contrary parte were driuen some to flie, some to deny, and some to dye, though to the most mens iudgements that heard the disputation, they had the vpper hand, as here may appeare by the report of the sayd disputation, the copy wherof we thought here to annexe as foloweth.

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¶ The true report of the disputation had and begon in the Conuocation house at London, the xviij. of October. An. 1553. 
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Block 6: The Dispute in Convocation: 1553

In the 1570 and subsequent editions, Foxe replaced a short notice about the 1553 Convocation with a more detailed account of its commencement (see textual variant 10 and textual variant 11). The short notice in the 1563 edition was reprinted entirely from Crowley's chronicle (see Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff2r). Up to and including the 1563 edition, all the information Foxe had about the Convocation came from Crowley's brief description and, of course, Philpot's account of it; for the 1570 edition he clearly had consulted some records of it.

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There is a complete version of Philpot's account of the 1553 Convocation in Rerum, pp. 215-30. The version in the 1563 edition is a reprinting of John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XVIII daye of Octobre MDLIIII, (Emden, 1554), STC 19890. In fact, in the 1563 edition, Foxe reprinted the title of Philpot's book (including its erroneous date of 1554) as the heading of his account (1563, p. 906). In subsequent editions Foxe corrected the date to 1553. In the 1570 edition, Foxe made both stylistic and substantive changes to Philpot's text; the most important of these will be discussed below. For all practical purposes, this text remained unchanged in succeeding editions.

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In the edition of 1570, Foxe recast the arguments presented in this Convocation into syllogisms. Moreover, on several occasions, Foxe went beyond this to re-word or even change Philpot's arguments.

 

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The True Report

Foxe capitalises on Moreman's mistakes in this section, as with the glosses 'Moreman affirmeth that Christ did eate his owne body' and 'Moreman denieth the Sacrament to haue a promise of remission of sinnes annexed vnto it'. Moreman is perhaps meant to be thought of as arrogant as well as stupid, as is suggested by the formulation ('Moremans aunswere to S. Paul'): this formulation is sometimes used in later disputations to describe protestant responses to patristic authors, but never scriptural ones: its use here suggests presumptuousness.

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The term 'shift' is very often used to describe the intellectual moves of the papists ('Moremans shift is ouer throwen' and 'Philpots replication to Moremans shift'; 'Moreman desireth a day to imagine some crafty shift', 'M. Watson for a bare shift putteth the fault in the Printer', 'Watson is driuē to a shamefull shift, to deny the author when he cannot aunswer'). Many of the references in this section can be found in all editions, reflecting the relatively lively state of the 1563 margin for this section. As with later disputations, there are procedural complaints, such as 'Weston woulde know whether they were sufficiently answered, when he and his had answered no argument'; see also, 'D. Weston contrary to his owne wordes' (all editions), 'Pye and westō roūd together' (1563 only). Also highlighted are the threatening and bullying of Philpot, as when he was commanded to be silent and threatened with prison ('Philpot is commaunded to silēce note this geare' and 'Philpot is threatened to prison. A good solutiō for all his arguments')(1563); see also 'Weston is offended. Philpots replycation aunswered by commaunding him to silence' (all editions). Also interesting in this context is the gloss 'Weston rayleth against Philpot, to be a madde man': Weston is guilty of that which he sees in Philpot, as suggested by the term 'rayleth'. An example running counter to trends observed elsewhere is the use of the term 'alleaged' by a protestant ('The wordes of Theodoretus alleaged').

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A great many of the glosses simply point out who is speaking. Perhaps because the text covers the material more briefly than is the case for the Oxford disputations, the glosses do not consider the issues in quite the depth that occurs later, nor do they have as many syllogisms or contentious theological or patristic questions to wrestle with or point out. A gloss highlighting Philpot's intention to use plain English ('Philpot speaketh playne Englysh') was dropped after 1563.

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MarginaliaA disputation of religion in Paules church in Londō the xviij. of October.WHere as diuers and vncertaine rumors be spread a broade of the disputation had in the Conuocation house, to the intent that all men may know the certainty of all thinges therein done and sayd, as much as the memory of him that was present thereat can beare away, hee hath thought good at request, throughly to describe what was sayd therein on both parties of the matters argued and had in question, and of the entraunce therof.

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Acte of the first day.

First vpon Wedensday being the. MarginaliaOctob. 18.xviij. of October at after noone, maister Weston the Prolocutor certified the house, that it was the Quenes pleasure that the company of the same house, beyng learned men, assembled, should debate of matters of religion, and constitute lawes therof, whych her Grace & the Parlament would ratifie. MarginaliaD. Weston Prolocutor agaynst the booke of Catechisme set forth in Kyng Edwardes tyme.And for that (sayd hee) there is a booke of late set forth, called the Catechisme (which he shewed forth) bearing the name of this honourable Synode, & yet put forth without your consentes, as I haue learned, being a boke very pestiferous, and full of heresies, and like wyse a booke of cōmon prayer, very abominable (as it pleased him to terme it) I thought it therfore well, first to begin with the articles of the Catechisme concerning the Sacrament of the aultar, to confyrme the naturall presence of Christ in the same, and also transubstantiation: Wherfore (sayd he) it shall be lawfull on Fryday next ensuing for all men freely to speake there cōscience in these matters, that all doubtes may be remoued and they fully satisfied therin.

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¶ Acte of the 2. day.

The Friday comming being the. MarginaliaOctob. 20.xx. of October, whē men had thought they should haue entred disputation of the questions proposed, the Prolocutor exhibited two seuerall billes vnto the house: MarginaliaTwo billes exhibited in the Conuocation house by the Prolocutor.the one for the naturall presence of Christ in the Sacrament of the aultar, the other concerning the Catechisme, that it was not of that houses agrement set foorth, and that they dyd not agree thereunto: requyring all them to subscribe to the same, as hee hym selfe had done. Whereunto the whole house did immediately assent, except MarginaliaM. Phillips, M. Haddon, M. Philpot, M. Cheyny, M. Elmar, and one other, refused to subscribe to the billes.syxe, which were þe Deane of Rochester, the Deane of Exceter, the Archdeacon of Winchester, the Archdeacon of Hertford, the Archdeacon of Stow, and one other. And whyle the rest were about to subscribe these two articles, Iohn Philpot stode vp and spake fyrst concerning the article of the Catechisme, MarginaliaThe booke of the Catechisme defended by M. Ioh. Philpot.that he thought they were deceiued in þe title of þe Catechisme, in that it beareth the title of the Synode of London last before this, although many of them which then were present were neuer made priuy thereof in setting it forth, for that this house had graūted the authority to make ecclesiasticall lawes vnto certaine persons to be appoynted by the kinges Maiesty, and whatsoeuer ecclesiastical lawes they or the most part of them did set forth, according to a statute in that behalfe prouided, it might be well sayd to

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to be
HHHh.iij.
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