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1682 [1644]

Quene Mary. Thynges done the 2. yeare of Queene Mary.

MarginaliaAn. 1554.offend in any of hys articles, which he had set foorth to the number of. 37. Of the which visitation of Boner, I haue somwhat more largely to entreate, after that fyrst I shall ouerpasse a few other thynges folowing in course of thys present story.

MarginaliaSeptemb. 18.The. xvij. day of September was a Proclamatiō in London, that all Vacabondes and masterles men, as well straungers as English men, should depart the cytie wythin. v. dayes: and straitly charging al inholders, Victulers, Tauerners, and Alehousekeepers, wyth all other that sell victuals, that they (after the sayd fyue daies) should not sell any meate, drinke, or any kynde of victuall to any seruingman whatsoeuer, vnlesse hee brought a testimoniall frō hys Maister to declare whose seruant he was, and were in cōtinuall household with his said Maister, vpon payne to runne in daūger of the lawe if they offend herein.

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Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation

As with Harpsfield's disputation, Foxe is keen to correct what he sees as popish errors: for example, the historical point about the doctrine of the natural presence. The anger follows the pattern of ostensible provocation by an attack on the godly (preachers in this case). The glosses concerned with Bonner's visitation are relatively restrained in their criticism: the reported actions of the bishop were presumably damning enough. Foxe marks the itinerary, and twice mentions his 'behauiour', priming the reader to focus on his conduct. Other glosses list his insulting and violent behaviour, making clear the rank and status of those abused to compound the sense of disorderly proceeding. The glosses suggest Bonner was both vicious and ridiculous: he goes in a 'pelting chase' which suggests a lack of self-control and is easily put down by Sir Thomas Josselin . Glosses note the discrepancies between editions that follow the usual pattern of 1583 being less accurate than earlier editions; also noted are examples of a mistake in 1570 corrected in later editions.

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MarginaliaSeptemb. 30.Vpon the Sonday following being the. xxx. day of September 
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Block 30: Gardiner's sermon to Bonner's visitation

Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 was mentioned, and a brief summary of it given, in 1563 (p. 1008). This was replaced in the next edition by a fuller and more detailed account (1570, p. 1644; 1576, pp. 1402-03; 1583, p. 1473). This account was based on notes taken by someone in the audience which survive in Foxe's papers (BL Harley 425, fol. 118r). The account printed by Foxe is more detailed than the material in his papers, and more hostile to Gardiner: Foxe seems to have embellished his source.

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the bishop of Winchester Lord Chauucellour of England preached at Paules Crosse, MarginaliaThe B. of Winchester preacheth.at whose sermon were present all the Counsell that were at the Court, namely the Marques of Winchester, the Earle of Arundel, Lord North, Syr Anthony Browne, maister Rochester, Maister Walgraue, maister Englefild, Lord Fitzwaters and Secretary Peter, and þe bishop of London, Duresme, and Ely, which three sat vnder the Bishops armes. The Gospell whereof hee made hys sermon is wrytten in the. xxij. chapter of Mathew. Where the Phariseis came vnto Christ, and amongest them one asked Christ which was the greatest cōmaūdement. Christ aunswered: Thou shalt loue thy Lorde God wyth all thy hart. &c. and thy neyghbour as thy selfe, in these ij. is cōprehended the law and the Prophetes. After hys longe declaration of these wordes, speaking very much of loue and charity, at the last he had occasion vpon S. Iames hys wordes to speake of the true teachers, and of the false teachers, saying, that all the Preachers almost in king Edwardes tyme preached nothyng but voluptuousnes, and filthy blasphemous lyes, affyrming their doctrine to be that false doctrine wherof S. Iames speaketh: MarginaliaA blasphemous mouth agaynst the true preachers of Gods word.saying, that it was full of peruerse zeale, earthly, ful of discord & discension, & that the preachers aforenamed would report nothing truly, & that they taught that it was lawfull for a man to put away hys wyfe for adultery and marry an other, and that if a man vowed to day, he myght breake it to morrow at hys pleasure, wyth many other thinges which I omyt. MarginaliaThe Church neuer confessed the natural body of Christ so to be in the sacrament, that the substance of bread was taken away before the tyme of Pope Innocent. 3. an. 1215.And when he spoke of the sacrament, he sayd that al the church from the beginning haue cōfessed Christes naturall body to be in heauen, & here to be in þe sacramēt, and so concluded that matter: and then wylled al men to say wyth Iosephes brethren: Peccauimus in fratrē. We haue all sinned against our brother, and so (sayd he) haue I to. Then hee declared what a noble king and Queene we haue, saying that if he should go abut to shew that þe king came hether for no necessity or nede, & what he had brought with him, it shoulde bee superfluous, seing it is euidētly knowen that he hath x. times as much as we are in hope & possession of, MarginaliaWinchester preacheth in commendation of Kyng Phillip.affrymyng him to be as wyse, sober, gentle and temperate a Prince as euer was in England, and if it were not so proued, thē to take hym for a false lyar for hys so saying: Exhortyng all men to make much of him, and to wynne hym whylest we had hym, and so should we also wynne all such as he hath brought wyth him, and so made an end.

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MarginaliaOctob. 2.Vpon the Tuesday folowyng, beyng the second day of October, 

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The treasure carts passing through London (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473) are mentioned in a number of contemporary chronicles, although Foxe included details in no other surviving source. The incident was probably taken from Foxe's lost chronicle source(s).

xx. cartes came frō Westminster laden (as it was noysed) with gold and siluer, and certaine of the Gard with thē through þe Citie to the Tower, & there it was receiued in by a Spaniard, who was the kyngs Treasurer and had custody of it within the Tower. It was matted about with mattes and mayled in littell bundels about ij. foote long and almost halfe a foote thicke, & in euery cart were vj. of these būdels. What it was in deede God knoweth, for it is to vs vncertain.

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About the same tyme, or a litle before, vpon Corpus Christi day, 

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Foxe's narrative of John Street's desecration of a Corpus Christi procession in 1554 (1563, p. 1005; 1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473) is of extraordinary interest. Foxe states at the conclusion of the narrative that 'the briefe Chronicle of London in this poynt is not to be credited, which untruely reported that he [Streat] fayned himselfe in Newgate to be mad: which thing, we in writing of this history by due inquisition of that partie [Streat], have found to be contrary'. Obviously this 'brief chronicle' was Foxe's initial source for this incident, but can this chronicle be identified? Only two of the surviving London chronicles, histories or diaries which preceded the 1563 edition contained this story. One is Machyn's diary, which clearly was not Foxe's source (see J. G. Nichols (ed.), The Diary of Henry Machyn, Camden Society Original Series 42 (London, 1848), pp. 63-64).

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The other version of the story is in what is called the Grey Friars' chronicle and this was very probably Foxe's source. It has the essential details of the incident, including Streat's name, that Streate was 'put in Newgatte and then fayned him selffe madde' (J. G. Nichols (ed.), Chronicle of the Grey Friars of London, Camden Society Original Series 53 (London, 1856), p. 89). This is particularly interesting since the Grey Friars' chronicle is known to have passed through the hands of John Stow. Foxe and Stow are known to have exchanged materials but not until after the 1563 edition, under the auspices of Matthew Parker. (There seems to have been a certain amount of personal tension between Foxe and Stow, and their cooperation was not entirely voluntary). Thus it appears that it was Foxe who originally acquired a copy of the Grey Friars' chronicle and passed it to Stow.

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That said, Foxe made very little use of the Grey Friars' chronicle, probably because he disliked and distrusted its anti-protestant bias. This distrust can be seen in his taking the trouble to find Streat and interview him about the incident, after he learned of it from the chronicle. (This is also an example of Foxe hunting down oral sources to confirm or deny written reports).

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the procession beyng made in Smithfield, where after the maner the Priest with hys boxe went vnder the Canapy, by chaunce there came by the way a certaine simple man, named Iohn Streate, MarginaliaIohn Streate. a Ioyner, of Colmā streete, who hauing some hast in his busines, and findyng no other way to passe through, by chaunce went vnder the Canapy by the Priest. The Priest seyng the man so to presume to come vnto the Canapy, beyng belyke afrayd, MarginaliaThe priest worse feared then hurt.and worse feared then hurt, for feare let his Pixe fall downe. MarginaliaThe priest let the Pixe fall for feare. The poore man beyng straight wayes apprehēded, was had to þe Counter, the Priest accusing hym vnto the Counsayle, as though he had come to slay him, when as the poore man (as he him selfe hath since declared vnto vs) had no such thought euer in his mynd. Then from the Counter he was had vnto Newgate, MarginaliaIoh. Streat innocently cast in the Dungeon.where he was cast into the Dongeon, there cheyned to a post, where he was cruelly and miserably handled, and so extremely dealt withall, that beyng but simple before, he was now feared out of hys witte altogether, and so vpon the same, had to Bedlem. Wherupon the brief MarginaliaIoh. Streat falsely reported in a certaine Chronicle.Chronicle of Lōdon in this poynt is not to be credited, which vntruly reporteth that hee fayned him selfe in Newgate to be mad: which thyng we in writyng of this history by due inquisition of the partie, haue found to be contrary.

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MarginaliaOctob. 5.About the v. day of October 

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After relating Streat's misfortunes, Foxe added a recital of the events of October and the first third of November 1554, all drawn from lost chronicle sources (1570, pp. 1644-45; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, 1473-74).

and within a fortnight folowing, were diuers as wel housholders as seruants and prentises apprehended and taken, and committed to sondry prisons, for the hauyng and sellyng of certaine bookes which were sent into England by the Preachers that fledde into Germany and other countreyes, which bookes nipped a great number so neare, MarginaliaMen prisoned for bookes.that within one fortnight there were litle lesse then 60. imprisoned for this matter: among whom was M. Browne a Goldsmith, M. Sparke a Draper, Randall Tirer a Stationer, M. Beston a Marchaunt, with many other.

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MarginaliaOctob. 14.Vpon the Sonday being the xiiij. day of October, the old Byshop of Duresme preached in the Shroudes.

Vpon S. Lukes day folowyng, being the xviij. of October, the kynges Maiestie came from Westminster to Paules Church alonge the Streetes accompanyed with a great number of noble men, and there he was receiued vnder a Canapy at the West doore, and so came into the Chauncell, where he heard Masse (which a Spanish Byshop and his owne Chappell song) and that done he returned to Westminster to dyner agayn.

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MarginaliaOctob. 25.Vpon the Friday beyng the xxvj. day of October, certaine men, wherof I spake before, MarginaliaThe trouble of the the good men whch were of M. Thogmortons Quest. which were of M. Throgmortons quest, beyng in number viij. for the other iiij. were deliuered out of prisō, for that they submitted them selues and sayd they had offended, lyke weaklynges not consideryng truth to be truth, but of force for feare sayd so: these viij. men I say (whereof Maister Emanuell Lucas, and M. Whetstone were chiefe) were called before the Counsaile in the Starre chāber: where they all affirmed that they had done all thynges in that matter accordyng to their knowledge & with good consciences, euen as they should aunswere before God at the day of Iudgement. Where M. Lucas said opēly before all the Lordes, that they had done in the matter like honest men, and true and faythfull subiectes, and therfore they humbly besought the Lord Chauncellor and the other Lordes, to be meanes to the Kyng and Queenes Maiesties that they might be discharged and set at libertie: and sayd that they were all contented humbly to submit them selues to their Maiesties, sauing and reseruing their truth, cōsciences, and honesty. Some of the Lordes sayd that they were worthy to pay a thousand poundes a peece, and other some sayd that M. Lucas and M. Whetstone were worthy to pay a thousand Markes a peece, and the rest fiue hundreth poundes a peece. In conclusion, sentence was ge-

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