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1684 [1646]

Quene Mary. The setting vp of the new Roode in Paules. Scriptures put out in Church walles.

MarginaliaAn. 1554.ther the Byshop were offended at those solemnities which hee wanted and was accustomed to be saluted withall in other places where he iorneyed, ioynyng to that his great God was not exalted aboue ground ouer the aultar, nor his blocke almighty set seemely in the roode loft to intertaine straungers, and therupon tooke occasion to quarell with Doct. Bricket (whose Religiō percase he somwhat suspected) I haue not perfectly to say, but so it was supposed of diuers þe cause therof to ryse, MarginaliaB. Boner driuen from a good dinner.which draue the Byshop so hastly from such a dynner. Testified by such as there and then were present Rich. K. &c.

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¶ A story of a Roode set vp in Lanckeshyre. 
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Block 31: The Lancashire Rood

The story of the ill-fated erection of a rood in Cockerham, Lancashire, was also added to the 1570 edition (1570, p. 1646; 1576, p. 1440 [recte 1404]; 1583, pp. 1474-75). This story came to Foxe from an individual anonymous informant, whose account survives in the martyrologist's papers (ECL 260, fols. 96r-97v). Foxe reproduced this account fairly faithfully, although he abridged it slightly.

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Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
The Lancashire Rood

The glosses encourage the reader's sympathies in a protestant direction. The phrase 'theyr Roode' emphasises the human institution of the rood as object and devotional focus, recalling the earlier reference to the rood as Bonner's God. At one level critical of popish religion as appealing to the immature instincts of the people a literal (mis)reading is permitted: the rood as a rood (not only a badly made one) drove children away. The fact that the Gloss, with its implication that the roodmaker may have deliberately spoiled his work on reformed principles, was dropped after 1570 perhaps provides an example of the kind of unsubstantiated claim Foxe came to regret and exclude.

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MarginaliaA story of a Roode set vp in Lankeshyre.In this Visitation of Byshop Boner aboue mentioned, ye see how the Byshop tooke on for not settyng vp the Roode, & ryngyng the Belles at Hadham. Ye heard also of the precept, which commaūded in euery Parish a Roode to be erected both well fauored, and of an hable stature. By the occasion wherof, it commeth in mynd, (and not out of place) to story likewise what happened in a certain towne in Lankeshyre nere to Lācaster called Cockrā, where the Parishners & Churchwardens hauyng the same tyme a lyke charge for þe erectyng of a Roode in their Parish Church, had made their bargain & were at a price with one that could cunnyngly karue & paynt such Idols, for the framing of their Roode: who accordyng to his promise made thē one, and set it vp in their church. This done, he demaūded his money. MarginaliaThe men of Cockram not pleased with their roode.But they mislikyng his workemanship, refused to pay him. Wherupon he arrested thē, & the matter was brought before the Maior of Dancaster, who was a very meete man for such a purpose, and an old fauourer of the Gospell, which is rare in that countrey. Then the karuer begā to declare how they had couenanted with him for the makyng of a Roode with the appurtenances ready karued and sette vp in their Church, which hee accordyng to hys promyse had done, and now demaundyng his money they refused to pay hym. Is this true, quoth the Maior to the Wardens? Yea Syr, sayd they. MarginaliaThe Maior of Dancaster taketh the roodemakers part, which would not shew hys cunnyng in such a naughty matter.And why do ye not pay the poore mā his due, quoth he? And it please you Maister Maior (quoth they) because the Roode we had before was a welfauoured man, and he promised to make vs such another: but this that he hath set vs vp now, is the worst fauoured thyng that euer you set your eyes on, gapyng and grynnyng in such sort that none of our children dare once looke him in the face or come nere him. MarginaliaThe roode of Cockram driuing the children out of the Church.The Maior thinking that it was good enough for that purpose if it had ben worst, my Maisters (quoth he) how soeuer the Roode like you, the poore mans labour hath bene neuer the lesse, and it is pitie that hee should haue any hinderaunce or losse therby. Therfore I will tell you what ye shall do: Pay hym the money ye promised hym, and go your wayes home and looke on it, and if it will not serue for a God, make no more ado, but clap a payre of hornes on hys head, and so will he make an excellent deuill. This the Parishners tooke well aworth, the poore man had hys money, and diuers laughed well therat: but so did not the babilonish Priestes.

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MarginaliaThe Maior of Dancaster a good man.This Maior aboue mentioned continued a Protestant almost fifty yeare, and was the onely releauer of M. Marsh the Martyr (whose story followeth hereafter) with meate, drinke, & lodgyng while he lay in Lancaster Castle the space of iij. quarters of a yeare, before he was had to Chester to be burned. &c.

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Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration

The differences between the glosses in 1563 and later editions concerning Bonner's mandate are instructive: 1563 has the gloss 'Pharisaicall zeale', while later editions focus on the scandal of the erasure of scripture, and suggest a perverse belief that scripture encourages vice on Bonner's part. The shift is between an implication of hypocrisy to one of a crazed, vicious sensibility: the latter fits in much better with the portrayal of Bonner in the glosses and text previously, and shows Foxe adjusting his imputations to suit the target. An error occurs between glosses in 1583 and 1570; 1570 is correct, later editions wrong.

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About this tyme or the moneth nexte before, which was October, there came a precept or mandate from Boner Byshop of Lōdon, to all Persons and Curates within his Diocesse, for the abolyshyng of such Scriptures & writynges, as had bene paynted vp in Church walles before in kyng Edwardes dayes. The copy of which precept or mandate here we thought good to expresse, that the world might see the wicked procedynges of their impious zeale, or rather their malicious rage a-

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gaynst the Lord and his word, and agaynst the edifying of Christian people: wherby it might appeare by this blottyng out of these Scriptures, not onely how blasphemously they spake agaynst the holy Scriptures of God, but also how studiously they sought by all maner meanes, to keepe the people still in ignoraunce.

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¶ A Mandate of Boner B. of Lond. to abolish the Scriptures and writinges paynted vpon the Church Walles. 
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Block 32: From Bonner's mandate to Pole's Oration

Foxe reprints Bonner's mandate to remove scripture verses from the church walls in his diocese from Bonner's register (cf. Guildhall MS 9531/12, fol. 357v with 1563, pp. 1006-07; 1570, p. 1646; 1576, p. 1440 [recte 1404] -1405 and 1583, p. 1475). In the first edition both the Latin original as well as an English translation were provided; in subsequent editions the Latin original was deleted. (The elimination of Latin documents from the 1570 edition was a consistently pursued policy).

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MarginaliaThe scriptures painted in churche walles rased out.EDmund by Gods permission bishop of London, to all and euery Parsons, Vicars, Clarkes, and lettered, wythin the parish of Hadham, or within the precinct of our diocesse of London wheresoeuer being, sendeth greeting, grace, and benediction. Because some children of iniquitie, geuen vp to carnall desyres and nouelties, haue by many wayes enterprised to banish the auncient maner and order of the Church, and to bring in and establish sectes and heresies, takyng from thence the picture of Christ, and many thinges besides instituted and obserued of auncient tyme laudably in the same, placing in the rowme thereof such thinges, as in such a place it behoued them not to doe: and also haue procured, as a stay to their heresies (as they thought) certayne scriptures wrongly applied, to be painted vpon the church walles, all which persons tende chiefly to this ende, MarginaliaNote well these causes reader, why the scriptures should be rased out.that they might vphold the libertie of the fleshe and mariage of Priestes, and destroy, as much as lay in them, the reuerend sacrament of the Aultar, and myght extinguish and eneruate holy dayes, fastyng dayes, and other laudable discipline of the Catholike church, MarginaliaScriptures open a window to vices, with Boner.opening a wyndowe to al vices, and vtterly closyng vp the way vnto vertue: Wherefore we beyng moued with a christian zeale, iudging that the promisses are not to be longer suffered, doe for discharge of our dutie, commit vnto you ioyntly and seuerally, and by the tenour hereof doe straitly charge and commaund you, that at the receite hereof, wyth all speede conuenient, you doe warne, or cause to bee warned, fyrst, second, and third tyme and peremptorily, all and syngular Churchwardens and parishioners, whosoeuer, wthin our foresayd diocesse of London, whersoeuer any such scriptures or paintings haue bene attempted, that they abolish and extinguish such maner of scriptures, so that by no meanes they be eyther read or seene, and therein to proceede moreouer as they shall see good and laudable in this behalfe. And if after the sayd monition, the sayd Churchwardens and Parishioners shal be found remisse and negligent, or culpable, then you ioyntly and seuerally shall see the foresayd scriptures to be rased, abolished, and extinguished forthwith: cytng al aud singular those Churchwardens & parishioners (whom we also for the same doe cite here by the tenour hereof) that all and singular the sayd Churchwardens and Parishioners being slacke and negligent, or culpable therein, shall appeare before vs, or our Vicar generall, & principall Officiall, or our Commissary speciall in our cathedrall Chuch of saint Paule at London, in the Consistory there, at the houre appoynied for the same, the sixt day next after their citation, if it be a court day, or els at the next court day after ensuyng, where as eyther we or our Officiall, or Commissary shall syt: there to say and alledge for them selues some reasonable cause, if they haue or can tell of any, why they ought not to be excommunciated, and otherwyse punished for their such negligence, slacknes, and fault, to say and to alledge, and further to do and receiue, as law and reason requiereth. And what you haue done in the premisses, do you certify vs, or our Vicar, principall Offciall, and such our Commissary, diligently and duely in all thinges, and through al things, or let hym among you thus certify vs, which hath taken vpon hym to execute this Mandate. In wytnes wherof, we haue set our seales to these presentes. Dated in the Bishops Palace at London, the xxv. day of the moneth of October, in the yeare of our Lord. 1554. and of our translation the. xvj.

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MarginaliaM. Christopherson sent to Cābrige with Gardiners iniunctiōs.About this tyme the Lord Chauncellour sent Maister Christoferson vnto the Vniuersitie of Cambridge 

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The account of Christopherson presenting Cambridge University with Gardiner's three articles and of twenty-four fellows being forced from St. John's appears to have come from a Cambridge informant, possibly the same informant who supplied the material on John Young's activities there which first appeared in 1563, p. 1000. Like that material, this account appeared in all four versions (1563, p. 1007; 1570, pp. 1646-47; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

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wyth these three articles, which hee enioyned them to obserue.

The fyrst, that euery Scholar should weare hys apparell according to hys degree in the Schooles.

The second was touching the pronunciation of the Greeke tounge.

The
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