Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1810 [1809]

Queene Mary. The persecution and Martyrdome of Thomas Wattes.

Marginalia1555. Iune.To the tenth he aunswered, and sayd, that he will submit hymselfe herein to the order of the law: and farther sayd, that he trusteth that with God he shalbe blessed, although with men he be accursed.

To the eleuenth he sayd, that he beleued that MarginaliaThe Bish. of Rome an enemy to Christ.the bishop of Rome is a mortall enemye to Christ and hys church. And as for Tooly he sayd hee dyd neuer see or know him: but in case the sayd Tooly did wish & pray, as is contained in the Article, then hee dyd lykewyse wish and consent with hym therein.

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To the xij. he aunswered, that all which before he confessed to be true, is also true: and all that hee hath denyed to be true, he denyeth againe to be true, and beleueth the same to be according to such thinges as hee hath confessed

By me Tho. Wattes.

¶ An other appearance of Thomas Wats in the Consistory. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

MarginaliaThomas Wattes agayne appeareth in the consistory.THese Articles thus propounded and aunswered, the bishop commaunded him to appeare agayne in the same place at three of the clocke in the after noone vpon the same day. At which houre, being brought thither by his keeper, the bishop began with him in thys wise: MarginaliaThe Bishops wordes to Thomas Wattes.Wattes, you know what I said vnto you to day, and what I appointed vnto you at this time. The time is now come: waygh and consider with your self, that you are but a man: and albeit that ye will wilfully cast away your body, yet cast not so away your soule, but while ye haue tyme, returne and confesse the truth.

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Whereunto Thomas Wattes aunswered and said: MarginaliaThe answere of Wattes.I am wery to lyue in such Idolatry as ye would haue me to lyue in. Vpon which aunswer the bishop caused hys articles againe to be read. He thereto aunswered as before, and farther subscribed the same wyth hys own hand.

¶ An other appearance before D. Harpsfield. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

MarginaliaAn other appearance before D. Harpsfield.THe Bishop, after many perswasions to cause hym to recant, willed him to depart as then, and to come agayne on Saterday at eight of the clocke in the morning. Where (the bishop being absent) Doctor Nicholas Harpsfield, as then being his deputy, 

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Nicholas Harpsfield was the archdeacon of Canterbury, but he was also the vicar-general of the diocese of London. In Wats's case, he is acting in the latter capacity.

dyd syt and earnestly exhorted hym to deny his opinions. To whom in the end he aunswered.

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MarginaliaWattes submitteth him to the law, but not to the Popes law.Well, ye haue a law to condemne me, and I submit my selfe to the law: but not to the lawes of the Church (as you cal it). And farther I doe affirme, and wyll stand to mine aunswers that I haue made.

Whereupon D. Harpsfield wylled hym to appeare there againe vpon Friday being the tenth day of the same moneth of May. MarginaliaThomas Wattes priuately appeareth agayne before the Bishop.Vpon which day the bishop priuately sent for the said Thomas Wattes into his chamber, and there with many fayre promises tempted and tryed hym, whether he would reuoke his errours (as he then termed them). But Wattes aunswered hym in this sort: MarginaliaWattes anwere to the Byshop.I wyll not beleue your church, neither the Romish church, & therefore you do but labour in vaine thus to trauaile with me. He was here vpon agayne dismyssed for that time, vntill Friday the. xvij. day of May, and then commaunded to appeare in the Consistory: which commaundement he obeyed, and hauyng the accustomed former articles ministred vnto hym, made then such aunsweres as before.

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¶ Thomas Wats brought againe to the Consistory. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

THus being tost to and fro, from day to day, & houre to houre: he was at the last, the. xviij. daye of the moneth of May, brought into the Consistorye, where fyrst was made a briefe recitall of all þe former processe: and there the said Wats being (by the bishop & others) willed to deny his profession, made this final aunswer: MarginaliaThe finall answere of Thomas Wattes.God kepe me from the doctrine that ye would haue me come vnto, which ye haue now declared. And I besech God that I may perseuer in that that I haue done, for I wyll stand to myne aunswers.

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The bishop perceauing his fayre flattering promyses nothing to preuaile (and hauing no great store of other reasons to perswade with) put forth his last and strongest argument of MarginaliaSentence of condemnation agaynst Tho. Wattes.condemnation. Which being ended, he was deliuered to the Shieriffes of London, and by them was sent to Newgate, where he remayned vntyll the ninth day of Iune (or as some record) to the. xxij. of May: at what tyme hee was caryed vnto Chelmesforde, and there was brought to Scots house keeping then an Inne at Chelmesford, where, as they were eating meate with Haukes & the rest that came downe to their burning, they prayed together both afore and after their meate.

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Then Wats went and prayed priuately to him self: and afterward came to hys wyfe and his. vj. chyldren being there, and sayd these words in effect: MarginaliaThe farwel of Tho. Wattes to his wife and six childrē.Wife, and my good children, I must now depart from you. Therfore hence forth know I you no more, but as the Lord hath geuen you vnto me, so I geue you againe vnto the Lord, whom I charge you, see you doe obey, and feare him: and beware ye turne not to this abominable Papistry, against the which I shall anone (by Gods grace) geue my bloud. Let not þe murthering of Gods Saints cause you to relent, but take occasion thereby to be the stronger in the Lordes quarell, and I doubt not, but he wyll be a mercyfull father vnto you. All these and such lyke wordes spake he vnto them, and they vnto hym, of whom two (as it is sayd) offered to bee burnt wyth him. In the end he bad them farewell, and kissed them all, and was caryed to the fier.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Thomas Wattes, at Chelmisford. An. 1555. Iune. 10.¶ The burnyng of Thomas Wattes, Martyr.

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This is one of the small cuts introduced in 1570, which saw repeated use. It was reused four more times after this appearance in, 1583, at pages 1683, 1704, 2021, 2045, and is one of the two small woodcuts (see also small cut [i]) that, unlike the majority, show martyrs in an unlit pyre with pikemen in the background. The curious lack of the top framing line in this instance, indicating that the block was shortened, also suggests this was some kind of exception in the series.

At the stake, after he had kissed it, he spake to my lord Rich, these or the like wordes: MarginaliaThe words of Tho. Wattes to the Lord Rich.My Lord sayth hee, beware, beware for you do against your own conscience herein, and without you repent, the Lord wyl reuenge it: For you are the cause of this my death. 

Commentary  *  Close

As the researches of Brett Usher have revealed, Lord Rich had been the patron of a number of evangelical preachers in Essex during the reign of Edward VI, thus explaining Wats's words to Lord Rich. (See the article by Brett Usher in John Foxe at Home and Abroad, ed. by David Loades[forthcoming]).

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¶ Concerning the childebed of Queene Mary, as it was rumoured among the people. 
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Queen Mary's False Pregnancy

All of the material Foxe ever printed on Mary's false pregnancy first appeared in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition Foxe deleted some material, most notably William Forest's poems. The account was printed without alteration in the 1576 and 1583 editions. The chief source for this material was London gossip; interestingly, gossip centred on the Aldersgate neighbourhood of John Day's printshop, where all four of the first editions of the Acts and Monuments were printed.

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MarginaliaThe childbirth of Q. Mary.LOng persuasion had bene in England with great expectation, for the space of halfe a yeare or more, that the Queene was conceiued with childe. This report was made by the Queenes Phisicians, and other nye about the court: so that diuers were punished for saying the contrary. And commaundement was geuen that in all churches supplication and prayers should be made for the Queenes good deliuery: the certificate

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wherof
CCCC.j.
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