Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1882 [1843]

Queene Mary. Persecution in Kent. W. Minge. Treuisam. Bland. Ioh. Frankesh, Martyrs.
Marginalia1555. Iuly.¶ William Mynge. 
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There is a brief statement in the Rerum (p. 503) that William Minge diedin prison in Maidstone. This was essentially all the information which Foxe ever obtained on Minge.

MarginaliaIuly. 2. MarginaliaWilliam Mynge dyed in prison.THe next day after M. Bradford and Iohn Leafe did suffer in Smithfield, William Mynge Priest dyed in prison at Maidstone, beyng there in bondes for Religion, & lyke to haue suffered also, if he had cōtinued the fury of his aduersaries, whose nature was to spare and fauour none that fauoured Christes pure Gospell: Which W. Mynge, with as great constancy and boldnes yelded vp hys life in the prison, as if it had pleased God to haue called him to suffer by the fire, as the other good and godly men had done at the stake, & as he him selfe was ready also so to do, if it had pleased God to haue called hym therunto. 

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Note how the ending of this section was changed in the 1570 edition to emphasize Minge's readiness to die a martyr's death. This was a response to the attacks of Nicholas Harpsfield, Foxe's most important contemporary critic, on Foxe for listing people who were not truly martyrs in the Acts and Monuments.

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¶ Iames Treuisam buried in the fieldes. 
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James Trevisam

This narrative, which first appeared in the 1570 edition, was obviously derived from personal informants, probably friends or family of Trevisam.

MarginaliaThe story of Iames Treuisam, buried in the fields, and summoned after his death.VPon the thyrd day of Iuly. an. 1555. dyed one Iames Treuisam, in the Parish of S. Margaret in Lothbury vpon a Sonday: who being impotent 

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Weak, infirm.

& lame kept his bed, for he could not rise out of it of a lōg tyme. This Treuisam had a seruaunt one Iohn Small which red on the Bible, & as he was in readyng, Berde þe promotor  
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Informant.

came to þe house & would needes go vp þe staires, where he found iiij. persons besides him, and his wyfe: to wytte, the young man that red, and ij. men, & a woman. All which folkes the sayd Berde the promotor there beyng apprehended, caryed vnto the Counter, where they remayned about a fortnight, for all the frendes they could make. Moreouer þe sayd Berd would haue had also Iames the lame man hym selfe to Newgate in a cart (and brought the cart to the doore) but for neighbors. Neuertheles þe poore mā was faine to put in ij. sureties for his forth cōmyng for he could not go out of his bed, being not only impotent, but also very sicke the same tyme. So within a few dayes the sayd Iames lying in extremes, the Parson of the Church, named M. Farthyng came to hym and had cōmunication with hym & agreed well, & so departed. MarginaliaMaster Farthyng parson of S. Margarets in Lothbery, accuser of Iames. It happened after the priest was come down into the streete, there mette him one Toller a Foūder. Yea, sayth he, be ye agreed? I wil accuse you, for he denyeth the Sacrament of the altar. Vpon that the Parson went vp agayne to hym, & then the Priest and he could not agree. And so the Parson went to the Byshop of London and told him. The Byshop aunswered that he should be burnt, and if he were dead he should be buryed in a ditch. And so when he dyed the Parson was agaynst hys wife as much as he could, neither would let her haue the Coffine to put hym in, nor any thyng els but was fayne to beare hym vpō a table to Morefield and there was he buryed. The same night the body was cast vp aboue the ground and his sheete taken from him & he left naked. After this the owner of the field seing him, buried him again, & a fortnight after the Somner came to his graue and summoned him to appeare at Paules before hys Ordinary to aūswere to such thyngs as should be layd agaynst him. But what more befell vpon him, I haue not certaynly to say.

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The hystory of M. Iohn Bland, Preacher and Martyr, constantly sufferyng for the word of IESVS CHRIST. 
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The Martyrdom of John Bland

The martyrdom of John Bland is particularly interesting because it is so rooted in the history of the reformation in Kent. Bland was a Cambridge graduate who was a protégé of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer and of Cranmer's commissary, Christopher Nevinson. (Bland's living of Adisham, which he had held from 1541, was in the gift of the archbishop of Canterbury). He was one of the most outspoken evangelists in Kent during the reign of Henry VIII, stripping the churches where he was pastor of images and furnishings as early as 1542, and preaching throughout eastern Kent, denouncing images, fast days, prayer to saints and other 'superstitious' practices. He also had associations with even more radical protestants in Kent; some of them rallied behind him in Mary's reign. His links to Cranmer, and his zealous evangelism made Bland a natural target for religious conservatives in Kent, and in the spring of 1543 his heresies were denounced to the king as part of the conspiracy against Cranmer which became known as the Prebendaries' Plot. Bland was indicted for heresy in September 1543, but the case against him collapsed when it became clear that Cranmer retained Henry VIII's support. Nevertheless, his Henrician adversaries would resurface in Mary's reign and play a key role in persecuting him.

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Bland's narrative of his persecution - the core of Foxe's narrative of his martyrdom - is a bewildering account of his being shifted from one form of custody to another, and more importantly, from clerical to secular jurisdiction and back again. The key problem for his enemies was that his arrest in December of 1553 came too soon. They were determined to try Bland for heresy, but the statute against heresy had been repealed under Edward VI and would not be revived until January 1555. So an elaboate game of cat and mouse followed, with Bland being arraigned in one jurisdiction, released on bond, then re-arraigned in another, all to keep Bland in some form of custody until the re-enactment of the heresy statute. In February 1555, with the statute now in force, Bland was transferred to spiritual jurisdiction for the final time and he was prosecuted for heresy.

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In the Rerum, Foxe only had a brief account of Bland's background, whichmay well have come from the protestant exile Edwin Sandys, who is rather prominently mentioned in it (Rerum, p. 503). This was reprinted in the 1563 edition, where it introduced a long letter by Bland to his father, relating the circumstances of his arrest, examinations, imprisonment down to the end of March 1555. Foxe also, in his first edition, added an account of Bland's examinations in June 1555 and his condemnation, all taken from a now lost Canterbury diocesan court book, as well as the prayer Bland was supposed to have given at his death. In the 1570 edition Foxe added a letter from Thomas Goldwell to Richard Thornden. There were no changes to this material in the 1576 or 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaIuly. 12. MarginaliaIohn Bland, Ioh. Frankesh, Martyrs.THe xij. of Iuly Ioh. Bland, Iohn Frankesh, Nich. Sheterden, and Humfrey Myddleton were all foure burned at Canterbury together, for one cause, of the which nūber Frankesh and Blande were Ministers, and Preachers of the word of God. The one beyng person of Adesham: the other the Vicare of Roluynden. This M. Blande was a man so litle borne for his own cōmoditie, 

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Advantage, profit.

þt no part of his lyfe was separated from the common and publicke vtility of all men. For his first doynges were there im-

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ployed to the bringyng vp of children in learnyng and vertue. Vnder whom were trayned diuers towardly young men, which euen at this present do handsomly florish. MarginaliaM. Bland scholemaster to D. Sandes Bishop of Worchester.In the number of whom is D. Sandes, 

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Bland either taught Sandys at Furness Abbey in Yorkshire or, more likely, at St John's, Cambridge, where they were contemporaries.

a man of such learnyng & worthines, as may wel beseme a scholer meete for such a Scholemaster, whom I here gladly name, for his singular giftes of vertue and erudition.

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After this he cōmyng to the ministery in the Church of God, or rather beyng called thereto, was inflamed with incredible desire to profite þe congregation, which may appeare by this: that where as he was cast into Canterbury prison for the preachyng of þe Gospell, and deliuered once or twise from thence at the sute of hys frendes: yet would he nedes preach the Gospel again, as soone as he was deliuered. Wherupon, he beyng the the thyrd time apprehended, MarginaliaM. Bland offred by his frendes to be deliuered, refused.when his frendes yet once agayne would haue found the meanes to haue deliuered hym, if he would haue promised to abstayne from preachyng: 

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The description of Bland's career is reprinted from the Rerum (p. 503) andreflects what Foxe learned about Bland in exile. It is also somewhat garbled. The mention of Bland's earlier arrest, or arrests, appears to be based on his indictment for heresy in 1543. As far as we know, he was not imprisoned then and there was no second imprisonment. (It is worth noting how Foxe moves from stating that Bland was imprisoned once or twice to affirming that there was a 'third' arrest). After this 'third' arrest (in 1553), Bland was not, by his own account, promised release if he abstained from preaching.

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he stoode in it earnestly, that he would admit no such condicion, notably well expressing vnto vs the maner and example which we read in the Apostle Paul: Who shall separate vs from the loue of CHRIST? tribulation, or anguish, or hunger, or nakednes, or daunger, or persecution, or the sword? &c. But to expresse the whole lyfe and doynges of this godly Martyr, seyng we haue his owne testimony concernyng the same: it shalbe best to referre the Reader to his owne reporte, writyng to hys father of the whole discourse of his troubles from the beginnyng almost to the latter end in order and maner as ye shall heare,

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¶ A discourse of the whole proces and doinges of Maister Bland written and reported by him selfe to his father in hys owne letter as foloweth 
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What follows is a very long letter, written by Bland to his father sometime between March 1555 and June 1555, describing his arrest and its causes, and what happened to him after that, down to the beginnings of proceedings against him for heresy in 1555.

DEarely beloued father in Christ Iesu, I thanke you for your gentle letters. And to satisfy your mynd, as concerning the troubles whereof ye haue heard, these shall both declare vnto you all my vexations that haue chaunced me since ye were with me, and also since I receyued your last letters. God kepe you euer.

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Your sonne Iohn Blande.

MarginaliaDeclaration of the troubles of M. Bland how and by whom he was apprehended and brought to his condemnation.FIrst, the thyrd day of September, being Sonday, after seruice ended, ere I had put of my surplise, MarginaliaIohn Austen persecutour.Iohn Austen came to the Table (cōmonly called the Lordes table) 

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I.e., the communion table. Bland had torn down the altar in the church and, in conformity with advanced protestant practice in Edward VI's reign, had erected a communion table in the nave.

and layd both his handes vppon it, saying: who set this here agayne? Now they say they tooke the Table downe, the Sonday before, which I knew not, neither do I know who set it vp agayne.  
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In Mary's reign, the table was taken down, but someone apparently re-erected it in the nave. Bland is being blamed for this and is saying that he did not know anything about it.

The Clerke  
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Laurence Ramsey, the parish clerk, was an outspoken protestant and a natural suspect.

aūswered, that he knew not. Then MarginaliaIohn Austen offended with the communiō table.Austen sayd, he is a knaue that set it here. I was then goyng downe the Church, marueilyng what he ment, and sayd: Goodmā Austen, þe Queenes highnes hath set forth a proclamation, that ye may moue no seditiō. And ere I could speake any more, he sayd: thou art a knaue. And I sayd: well goodman Austen, that I haue sayd, I haue sayd. By Gods soule quoth he, thou art a very knaue. Then my Clerke spake to him: but what, I am not sure. But he sayd, MarginaliaNote the vncharitable spirite of this Papist: and so commonly of them all.ye are both hereticke knaues, and haue deceiued vs with this fashion to long, and if he say any seruice here agayne, I wil lay the table on his face: and in that rage he with other toke vp þe table, & laid it on a chest in the Chauncell, and set the trestles by it. 
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Apparently the table was simply a board set upon a pair of trestles.

Wherfore I rode by and by to MarginaliaM. Isaac a good Iustice.M. Isaac, and shewed hym the cause, both how seditiously he had spoken, and performed it with a lyke deede. M. Isaac directed a warrant to the Constable or Bosholder, 
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A parish officer with functions identical to that of a petty constable [OED].

which was incontinently serued, so that he was brought before him the same night, and was bound by Recognisance, with sureties, to appeare, if he were called. But we agreed so well then, that it was neuer called for, MarginaliaThe communion table set vp agayne.the table was brought downe, and I was permitted as before. 
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Round one to Bland; with the support of Edward Issacs, a JP and a staunch protestant, he had got a writ that directed that the communion table be restored. At this point, early in Mary's reign with the old Edwardian laws still on the books, the law was still on Bland's side.

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The xxvj. day of Nouember, beyng Sōday MarginaliaRichar Austē Tho. Austen persecutors.Richard Austen, and his brother Thomas came to the foresayd table after the Communion was done, and as I was goyng by, then Richard sayd vnto me: Master Parsō, we haue to speake to you. And I said, what is your wil?

And
IIII.j.
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