Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1903 [1864]

Quene Mary. Iames Abbes, Joh. Denley, Ioh. Newman, Patrike Pathingham, Martyrs.

MarginaliaAn. 1555. August.tholicke buriall, yet we see no cause why to exclude hym out of the number of CHRISTES holy Martyrs and heyres of hys holy kingdome.

Iames Abbes, a Martyr of blessed memory sufferyng for the true cause of Christes Gospell. 
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The Martyrdom of James Abbes

The Rerum contained a note that James Abbes was burned at Bury St Edmunds on 2 August 1555 (p. 510). The entire account of Abbes appeared in the 1563 edition and it was based partly on copies of official documents (which survive) and on personal testimony. There were no changes to this account in the subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaAugust. 2.AMong many that trauailed in these troublesome dayes to kepe a good consciēce, there was one MarginaliaIames Abbes, Martyr.Iames Abbes a young man, which through compulsion of the tyranny then vsed, was enforced to haue his part with his brethren in wandryng and goyng from place to place, to auoyde the perill of apprehending. But when time came, that the Lord had an other worke to doe for him, he was caught by the handes of wicked men, and brought before the Byshop of Norwich, Doct. Hopton. Who examinyng hym of his Religion, and chargyng him therewith very sore, both with threates and fayre speach, MarginaliaIames Abbes relented.at the last the sayd poore Iames did yeld, and relented to their naughty persuasions, although his conscience consented not therto. 

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A denunciation of Abbes and others for heretical beliefs, copied from Norwich records which are no longer extant, survives among Foxe's papers (BL, Harley 421, fo. 186v). A copy of an interrogation of Abbes on 10 March 1554 is BL, Harley 421, fos. 216v-217r. A copy of a sentence against Abbes is on BL, Harley 421, fos. 199r-200r. Abbes must have abjured after this sentence.

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Now when he was dimissed, 

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From here until the end of the account of Abbes, Foxe is relying on personal testimony or testimonies, not official documents.

and should go from the Byshop, the Byshop callyng him agayne, MarginaliaMoney geuen to Iam. Abbes by the Bishop.gaue hym a peece of money, either fourty pence or xx. pence, whether I know not: which when the sayd Iames had receiued and was gone from the Byshop, MarginaliaA notable example of sting of conscience.his conscience begā to robbe and inwardly to accuse his facte, how he had displeased the Lord by consenting to their beastly illusions. In which combate with him selfe (beyng piteously vexed) hee went immediatly to the Byshop agayne, MarginaliaIames Abbes throweth to the Bishop his money againe.and there threw hym his sayd money which he had receiued at his hand, & sayd, it repented him that euer he gaue his consent to their wicked persuasions, and that he gaue his consent in takyng of his money.

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Now this beyng done, the Byshop with his Chaplaines, did labour a fresh to wynne him agayne: but in vayne, MarginaliaIames Abbes made strong by his infirmitie.for the sayd Iames Abbes would not yeld for none of them all, although he had playd Peter before through infirmitie, but stode manfully in his masters quarell to the end, and abode the force of the fire, to the

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Iam. Abbes, at Burie. An. 1555. August. 2.The Martyrdome of Iames Abbes.

consumyng of his body into ashes, which tyranny of burnyng was done in Berie the second day of August, an. 1555.

A discourse of the apprehension, examination, and condemnation, of Iohn Denley Gentleman, Iohn Newman, and Patrike Pathingham, Martyred for the testimonie of Christes Gospell. 
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The Martyrdoms of Denley, Newman and Patingham

The Rerum has a note that Denley, exaggeratedly described as being of noble family ('genere nobilis'), was burned at Uxbridge on 2 August 1555 (p. 510). There is also a version of the articles objected against Denley and Newman together with their answers (pp. 510-13). This is followed by a reiterated mention of Denley's death at Uxbridge and a statement that Newman was burned in September (actually it was 31 August 1555) in Saffron Walden (p. 513). Finally, Foxe stated that he would later print Newman's confession of faith (p. 513). He would print this confession offaith in the 1563 edition but not in the Rerum.

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In the 1563 edition, all of the material Foxe would ever have on Denley and Patingham was present, badly arranged. Tyrrell's letter, Newman's confession of faith and a letter from Denley to Simpson and Ardley were now printed, along with a somewhat different, and more complete, version of the articles and answers of Denley and Newman (these last almost certainly taken from official records). The desciption of the final examination of the three martyrs, first printed in this edition, may have come from either official records or personal testimony, but the account of Denley's execution was certainly based on personal testimony.

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In the 1570 edition all these materials were re-arranged, but Newman's confession of faith and Denley's letter to Simpson and Ardley were dropped. On the other hand, Newman's account of his examinations in Canterbury was added to this edition, together with Foxe's 'notes' breaking Newman's arguments into syllogisms. Foxe must have received this material while the 1570 edition was being printed, as he inserted it in the text over four hundred pages after the account of Newman's martyrdom (1570, pp. 2135-37). No changes were made to this material in the 1576 edition, and Newman's Canterbury examinations were still printed hundreds of pages out of chronological order (1576, pp. 1856-58). In the 1583 edition, Newman's confession of faith was restored. His Canterbury examinations were integrated with the account of his martyrdom. But, through an oversight, these examinations were also reprinted in their old location hundreds of pages later (1583, pp. 1950-51); consequently these examinations were printed twice in the 1583 edition.

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MarginaliaIohn Denley gentlemā, Ioh. Newman, Patrike Pathingham, Martyrs.IN the middest of this tempestuous rage of malignant aduersaries 

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Notice how this passage was toned down in the 1570 edition; this is another example of Foxe moderating his language in the second edition.

persecutyng & destroyng þe poore flocke of CHRIST, many there were, which though they were no spirituall men,  
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I.e., clerics.

yet thought to helpe forward, for their partes, & as one would say, to heape vp mo coales to this furious flame of persecutiō, whether of a blynd zeale, or of a Parasiticall  
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This was was 'pharasitical' in the 1563 and 1570 editions. It was changed to 'parasitical' in the 1576 edition, undoubtedly as a printer's error. This mistake was reprinted in the 1583 edition.

flattery I know not. Amongest which one was MarginaliaEdmond Tyrrell Esquier.Edmond Tyrell Esquier, and at that tyme a Iustice of peace within the County of Essex, an assister (as it seemeth) to the cruell murtherers of Gods Saints. Who as he came from the burnyng and death of certein godly Martyrs, met with M. Iohn Denley Gētleman, and one Iohn Newman, (both of Maidstone in Kent) trauelyng vppon the way, and goyng to visite such theyr godly frendes, as then they had in the sayd County of Essex. 
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Denley and Newman were taking a letter to John Simpson and John Ardley (1563, p. 1246). Simpson had been one of the leaders of the Bocking conventicle, a gathering of protestants from Kent and Essex, in 1550. Simpson also wrote a letter to a congregation in Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex and Kent. (See Freeman [2002], p. 130 n.5). Denley and Newman were probably part of Simpson's network of Kentish contacts.

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And vppon the sight of them as he yet braggeth, first vpon suspition apprehended, and searched them: and at last, findyng the confessions of their fayth in writyng about them, sent them vp vnto the Queenes Commissioners, directyng also vnto one of the same Commissioners, these his fauourable letters in their behalfe. The copy whereof here may appeare as foloweth.

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¶ A copy of Edmund Tyrilles letter, to one of the Queenes Commissioners. 
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Where Foxe obtained this letter is a little mysterious as it would not have been in an ecclesiastical register. It was probably found in Whitehall and given to Foxe by William Cecil. In 1570, Foxe added a marginal note saying that the recipient was Sir Richard Southwell; Foxe must have learned this from whoever gave him this letter.

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MarginaliaA letter of detection written by Master Edmond Tyrrell to a Commissioner, whom I gesse to be Sir Rich. Southwel.SIr, with most harty commendations vnto you, these shalbe to aduertyse you, that I haue receiued a letter from sir Nicholas Hare and you, and other of the King and Queenes maiesties Commissioners, by a seruaunt of the king and Quenes, called Iohn Failes,for certaine busines, about Saint Osythes, the which I could not immediately go about, for that I had receiued a letter from the Counsell, to assist the Shieriffe for the execution of the heretickes, the one at Rayleygh, 

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I.e., John Ardley.

and the other at Rocheford,  
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I.e., John Simpson.

the which was done vppon tuesday last.

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And as I came homeward, I met with two men: Euen as I saw them, I suspected them, and then I dyd examyne them, and search them, MarginaliaMaster Denley and Iohn Newman, by the way mette and apprehended, by M. Edmond Tyrrell. and I did fynd about them certayne letters, which I haue sent you, and also a certayne wryting in paper, what their fayth was. And they confessed to me that they had forsaken and fled out of their countrey  

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In the sixteenth century, country and county were synonymous; in this case Kent is meant.

for religions sake: and sythen they haue bene in many countreyes, by their confession, which I haue sent you: for the which I thought it good (for that they came from London, and that there might be more had of them, then I yet haue vnderstand) to send them to you, whereby you and others of the King and Queenes Commissioners there, might try them, so that their lewdnes might be throughly knowen: for I thinke these haue caused many to trouble their consciences. So thys hath bene some let to me, wherfore I could not go about these matters expressed in your letters: but to morrow noone I entēd by Gods grace to accōplish your letters, with as much diligence as I may. And this the holy trinity haue you euer in his keepyng, I besech you to bee so good Maister, to discharge these poore men that bring these prisoners vp assone as may be. And thus most hartely farewell, from Ramesdon Parke, the. xij. day of Iune. 1555.

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By your assured to commaund,
Edmund Tyrrell.

For so much as in this letter mention is made of a certaine writing in paper founde about them of theyr faith, what this writing was, and what were the contentes of them, the copy thereof here ensueth.

¶ Certaine notes collected and gathered out of the scriptures, by Iohn Denley Gentelman, with a confession of his faith, touching the sacrament of Christes body and bloud, found about him ready written, at hys apprehension.
CHRIST
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