Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1934 [1895]

Queene Mary. The life and story of D. Nicholas Ridley Bishop of London. Martyr.
Marginalia1555. October. Doct. Nicholas Ridley and M. Hugh Latimer, both Byshops, preachers, and Martyrs of Christ, with their doinges, conferences, and sufferynges described. 
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Life and Character of Ridley

Perhaps rather surprisingly there is no account of Nicholas Ridley's life in theRerum. This can be explained by the pressure Foxe was under to complete the Rerum in time for the Frankfurt book fair in September 1559. Those martyrs executed after the summer of 1555 received, with one or two exceptions, little notice in the Rerum because Foxe was running close to his September deadline. Foxe made up for this neglect in the first edition of the Acts and Monuments. Most of the account of Ridley's life and behaviour first appeared in the 1563 edition and was clearly based on the testimony of those who knew the bishop. (It is worth remembering that Ridley ordained Foxeas a deacon in 1550 and that Edmund Grindal was one of those closest to the martyredbishop). Additions were made to this account in the 1570 edition which were clearly derived from the testimony of Ridley's brother-in-law George Shipside. No changes were made to this material in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaDoctor Nicholas Ridley, Martyr.THe same yeare, moneth, & day in which the foresayd ij. Martyrs William Wolsey, and Tho. Pygot suffered at Eley, the which was. an. 1555. October 16. folowed also at Oxford the slaughter of ij. other speciall and singular captaines, and principall pillars of CHRISTES Church, M. Ridley Bishop of London, and M. Hugh Latimer, Bishop some times of Worcester: of whose famous doynges and memorable learnyng, and incomparable ornamentes and giftes of grace, ioyned with no lesse commendable sinceritie of life, as all the Realme can witnesse sufficiently: so it nedeth not greatly that we should stand exactly at this tyme in setting forth a full description of the same, but onely to comprehend briefly a few wordes touchyng the order of their lyues, so much as necessarily serueth to the due instruction of the reader, and maketh to the vse of this present history, in declaryng first their begynnyng & bringyng vp, then their studies and actes in the Vniuersitie, their prefermentes also by their studies to higher dignitie, at last their trouble and trauaile in setting forth Religion, and in mainteinyng the same to the shedyng of their bloud. And first to begyn with the life of M. Ridley, whose story here ensueth.

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AMong many other worthy and sondry histories & notable Actes of such as of late dayes haue bene tormoyled, murdered, and Martyred for the true Gospell of CHRIST in Queene Maryes reigne, the tragicall story and life of Doct. Ridley I thought good to commend to Chronicle and leaue to perpetuall memory: beseching thee gentle reader, with care & study wel to peruse, diligently to consider, and depely to print the same in thy brest, seing him to be a man beautified with such excellēt qualities, so ghostly 

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Spiritually.

inspired, & godly learned, and now written doubtles in the booke of life with the blessed Saintes of the almighty, crowned and throned amongest the glorious company of Martyrs. First descendyng of a stocke right worshypfull,  
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The changes in this phrase from the 1563 to the 1570 edition are interesting. In the first edition Ridley was described as being from 'gentlestock' and he was promoted to being from 'stock right worshipful'. William Turner, a leading protestant divine and writer, wrote a letter to Foxe, dated 26 November 1564, in which, among other things, he described Ridley's background and early life.In the letter, Turner declared that Ridley was 'e nobili Ridleiorum prosapia prognatus' [descended from the noble family of Ridley] and pointed out that one of Ridley's uncles was a knight and another a famous divine (BL, Harley 416, fo. 132r). Foxe did not use any other information about Ridley which Turner supplied but this passage in Foxe's text may have been changed because of Turner's emphasis on the high status of the Ridley family. (Turner's letter is printed, with an English translation, inThe Works of Nicholas Ridley, ed., Henry Christmas [Parker Society, 1841], pp. 487-95).

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he was borne in Northumberlādshire, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley borne in Nothumberland. who being a child, learned his Grammer with great dexteritie in Newcastle, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley learned at Newcastle. and was remoued from thence to the Vniuersitie of Cambridge, where he in short space became so famous, that for his singular aptenes he was called to higher functions and offices of the Vniuersitie, by degree atteinyng thereunto, & was called to be head of Pembroke Hall, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley Master of Pembroke hall in Cābridge. & there made Doctour of Diuinitie. MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made D. of Diuinitie. After this, departyng frō thence he trauailed to Paris, who at his returne, was made Chapleine to K. Henry the 8. MarginaliaNicholas Ridley King Henries Chapleine. and promoted afterwardes by him to þe Bishopricke of Rochester:  
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Henry VIII did not create Ridley bishop of Rochester. Henry died on 28 January 1547, while Ridley was appointed bishop of Rochester at the end of August 1547 and consecrated in September of that year.

MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made B. of Rochester. and so from thence translated to the sea & Bishopricke of London MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made B. of London. in K. Edwardes dayes.

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MarginaliaThe fruitfull diligence of B. Ridley in preaching gods word.In which callyng and offices he so trauailed and occupyed him selfe by Preachyng and teachyng the true and holesome doctrine of CHRIST, that neuer good child was more singularly loued of his deare parentes, then he of his flocke and Dioces. Euery holyday and Sonday he lightly 

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Pleasantly.

preached in some one place or other, except hee were otherwise letted  
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In the first edition, the word here is 'detented' which means held back or obstructed [OED]. In subsequent editions this word was replaced with the word'letted' which means hindered.

by waighty affaires and busines: to whose Sermons the people resorted, swarming about him like bees, and coueting the sweete flowers and wholesome ioice of the fruitfull doctrine, which he did not onely preach, but shewed the same by his life, as a glittering lanterne to the eyes and senses of the blind, in such pure order and chastitie of life (declinyng from all euill desires and concupiscences  
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Carnal desires.

) that euen his very enemyes could not reproue him in any one iote therof.

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Besides this, he was passingly well learned, MarginaliaB. Ridley, of great memory and reading.his memory was great, and he of such readyng withall that of right he deserued to be cōparable to the best of this our age, as can testifie as well diuers his notable workes, pythy Sermons, and sundry his disputations in both þe Vniuersities, as also his very aduersaries, all which will say no lesse them selues.

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Besides all this, wise he was of counsail, deepe of witte, and very politike in all his doinges. How mercyfull and carefull he was to reduce þe obstinate Papistes from their erronious opinions, and by gentlenes to wynne them to the truth, his gentle orderyng and curteous handlyng of Doct. Heath late Archbyshop of Yorke, 

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Nicholas Heath had been deprived of the bishopric of Worcester in 1551 and placed in Ridley's custody. In Mary's reign he was restored to his bishopric and then promoted to the archbishopric of York. Foxe refers to him as the late archbishop because he was deprived of the office in 1559.

beyng prisoner with him in K. Edwardes time in his house one yeare, sufficiently declareth. In fine, he was such a Prelate, and in all pointes so good, godly, and ghostly a mā, that Englād may iustly rue the losse of so worthy a treasure. And thus hitherto cōcernyng these publicke matters.

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Now will I speake somthing further particularly of his person & conditiōs. MarginaliaB. Ridley comely of proportion and complexion.He was a mā right comely, and wel proportioned in all pointes, both in cōplection & lineamentes of the body. He tooke all things in good part, bearyng no malice or rācour in his hart, but straight wayes forgetting all iniuries and offēces done against him. MarginaliaThe fayre conditions of B. Ridley.He was very kynd and naturall to his kinsfolke, and yet not bearyng with them any thyng otherwise then right would require, MarginaliaB. Ridley tender to his kinred yet not otherwise then truth and rigor required. geuing them alwayes for a generall rule, yea to his owne brother and sister, that they doyng euill should seeke or looke for nothing at his hand, but should be as straungers & alienes vnto hym: and they to bee his brother or sister,  

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I.e., Ridley's brother-in-law George Shipside and his sister (and Shipside's wife) Alice.

which vsed honesty, and a godly trade of life.

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He vsing all kyndes of wayes to mortifie him selfe, was geuen to much prayer and contēplation: MarginaliaB. Ridley a great mortifier of hym selfe. For duely euery mornyng so soone as his apparell was done vppon him, he went forthwith to his bed chamber, and there vpō his knees prayed the space of halfe an houre: which beyng done, MarginaliaThe order of his study and diet.immediatly he went to his study (if there came no other busines to interrupt him) where he cōtinued till x. of þe clocke, & then came to cōmon prayer daily vsed in his house. The praiers being done, he wēt to dynner, where he vsed litle talke, except otherwise occasiō by some had ben ministred, & then was it sober, discrete, & wise, and sometime mery as cause required.

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The dynner done, which was not very long, he vsed to sit an houre or thereaboutes talking or playing at þe Chestes: 

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I.e., chess.

That done, he returned to his study, and there would continue, except suters or busines abroad were occasion of the contrary, vntill. v of the clocke at nyght, and then would come to common prayer, as in the forenoone: which being finished, he went to Supper behauing himselfe there, as at his dynner before: MarginaliaHis order after supper.After supper, recreating himselfe in playing at Chestes the space of an houre, he would then returne agayne to his studie, continuing there till a. xj. of the clocke at nyght, which was his common houre to go to bed, then saying hys prayers vpon his knees as in the morning when hee rose. Being at his Manour of Fulham, as diuers tymes he vsed to bee, MarginaliaThe carefull diligence of B. Ridley in instructing his familie.hee red dayly a lecture to his family at the common prayer, begynning at þe Actes of the Apostles, and so going throughout all the Epistles of Saint Paul geuing to euery man that could read, a newe Testament, hyring them besydes with money to learne by hart certayne principall Chapiters, but especially the thyrtenth Chapiter of the Actes, reading also vnto his household often tymes the hundred and one Psalme, being maruaylous carefull ouer hys family, that they might bee a spectacle of all vertue and honesty to other. To be short, as hee was Godly and vertuous hymselfe, so nothing but vertue and Godlynes reigned in his house, feeding them with the foode of our Sauiour IESVS CHRIST.

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Now remaineth a word or two to be declared of his gentle nature & kindly pitie in the vsage of an old wo-

man
NNNN.iij.
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