Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1935 [1896]

Quene Mary. Persecution in Oxford. The story of D. Ridley Byshop of London, Martyr.

MarginaliaAn. 1555. October.man called Mistres Boner, mother to Doctor Boner, sometyme Bishop of London: which I thought good to touch, as well for the rare clemency of Doctor Ridley, as the vnworthy immanity and ingratefull disposition againe of D. Boner. MarginaliaThe behauiour of Bishop Ridley to Doctour Boners mother.Bishop Ridley being at hys Manour of Fulham, alwayes sent for the sayd Mistres Boner, dwelling in an house adioyning to his house, to dynner and supper, with one Mistres Mungey Boners syster, saying: Go for my mother Boner: who comming was euer placed in the chayre at the Tables ende, being so gently intreated, welcomed, and taken, as though he had bene borne of her owne body, being neuer displaced of her seate, although the kynges counsayle had bene present, saying, when any of them were there (as dyuers tymes they were) by your Lordships fauour, this place of ryght and custome is for my mother Boner. But how well hee was recompensed for thys hys singular gentlenes, and pitifull pietie after at the handes of the sayd Doctor Boner, almost the least chylde that goeth by the ground can declare. MarginaliaThe courtesy of Ridley & the currishnes of Boner described and compared together. For who afterward was more enemy to Ridley then Boner and hys? Who more went about to seeke his destruction, then he? recōpensing his gentlenes with extreme cruelty.  

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Note that in the 1563 edition, Foxe accused Bonner of imprisoning Alice Shipside, Nicholas Ridley's sister. Foxe was much less specific about this in the 1570 edition but much more detailed about the ordeals of George Shipside. As the source for the 1570 account was Shipside himself, this version of events is more accurate. Although Foxe does not say so, Shipside was not persecuted out of unmotivated malice, he was arrested when he was caught delivering works which Ridley had written while incarcerated to one of the bishop's former chaplains (see ECL 260, fo. 115r - printed in Letters of the Martyrs, p. 54 - also see Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 56-57).

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As well appeared by the strayt handeling of Ridleys own naturall syster, and George Shypsyde her husband, from time to tyme: MarginaliaB. Ridley good and kinde to Boners mother.where as the gentlenes of the other dyd suffer Boners mother, sister, and other hys kynred, not onely quyetly to enioy all that which they had of Boner: but also entertayned them in hys house, shewing much courtesy and friendship dayly vnto them: whereas on the other syde, Bishop Boner beyng restored agayne, MarginaliaBoner vnkind and churlish to B. Ridleyes sister, & seketh the death of his brother in law.would not suffer the brother and naturall syster of Bishop Ridley, and other hys friendes, not onely not to enioy that which they had by the sayd their brother Bishop Ridley, but also currishly without all order of lawe or honesty, by extort power wrasted from them all the lyuinges they had. 
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In the 1570 edition, Foxe states that George Shipside was the source for this material. The reference to Bonner 'extorting' possesions is to Bonner's refusal to accept the validity of leases which Ridley had made, as bishop of London, granting episcopal property to Alice Ridley and her husband. These leases were a subject of vital importance to Ridley; almost his last act on earth was to petition Mary toconfirm them.

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And yet beyng not therewyth satisfied, he sought all the meanes he could, to worke the death of the foresaid Shipside saying that he would make. xij. Godfathers to go vpon him. Which had bene brought to passe in deede at what time he was prisoner at Oxford, had not God otherwise wrought his deliueraunce by meanes of Doctour Heath bishop then of Worcester. 

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Nicholas Heath had been deprived of the bishopric of Worcester in 1551 and placed in Ridley's custody. In Mary's reign he was restored to his bishopric and then promoted to the archbishopric of York. Foxe refers to him as the late archbishop because he was deprived of the office in 1559.

Teste Georg. Shipsido.

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Whereby all good indifferent 

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Impartial, unbiased.

Readers notoriously haue to vnderstand, what great diuersitie was in the disposition of these two natures. Whereof as the one excelled in mercy and pity: so the other againe as much or more excelled in churlish ingratitude, and dispitefull disdayne. But of thys matter enough.

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Now cōcerning Gods vocatiō, how D. Ridley was first called to the sauouring & fauouryng of CHRIST & hys Gospell, partly by hys disputation before, & other hys treatises it may appeare, that MarginaliaB. Ridley first conuerted by reading Bertrams booke.the first occasion of hys conuersion was by reading of Bertrams booke of the Sacrament, 

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This is the De corpore et sanguine Domini of the medieval theologian Ratramnus of Corbie. This work was translated, probably by William Hugh, in 1546, as The booke of Barthram priest intreating of the bodye and bloude ofChrist (STC 20748.5).

whom also the conference with bishop Cranmer, and wyth Peter Martyr  
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Foxe's wording is unclear as to what 'the conference' with Cranmer and Martyr was, but he is probably referring to the disputations on the eucharist held at Oxford in May 1549, in which Cranmer and Martyr played leading roles.

dyd not a litle confirme in that behalfe. Who now by the grace of God, beyng throughly wonne and brought to the true way, as he was before blynde and zealous in hys olde ignoraunce: so was hee as constant and faythfull in the ryght knowledge which the Lord had opened vnto hym (as well appeared by hys preachinges and doings during all the tyme of King Edward) and so long dyd much good, whyle authoritie of externe power might defend and hold vp the peace of the church, and proceedinges of the Gospell. But after that it pleased so the heauenly wyll of our Lord our God to beriefe vs of that stay, and to call from vs King Edward that precious Prince, as the whole state of the Church of England was left desolate and open to the enemies hand: so this Bishop Ridley, after the cōming in of Queene Mary, MarginaliaB. Ridley one of the first in trouble after the death of K. Edward.eftsoone and wyth the first was layd hands vpon and committed to pryson, as before hath sufficiently

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bene expressed: fyrst in the Tower, MarginaliaB. Ridley in the Tower. then after translated from thence with the Archb. of Canterbury, & Master Latimer to Oxford, was wyth thē enclosed in the common Iayle and pryson of Bocardo,  

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A Bocardo is a type of syllogism whose logic was supposed to be impossible to escape. The Oxford gaol, on the north gate of the city, was nicknamed the Bocardoin consequence.

MarginaliaB. Ridley remoued to the prison of Bocardo in Oxford. while at lēgth being disseuered from them, he was committed to custody in the house of one Irysh, where hee remayned tyll the last day of hys death and Martyrdome, which was from the yeare of our Lord. 1554. tyll the yeare 1555. and xvj. day of October.

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Furthermore, as touching his disputations and cōflictes had at Oxford, MarginaliaRead before pag. 1607. and also of his determination had at Cambrige, also hys trauailes in perswading and instructing the Lady Mary before she was Queene, MarginaliaBefore pag. 1566. hys reasons and conference lykewyse had in the Tower at the Lieftenaunts boord, enough hath bene said already. Besides thys, other conferences he had in pryson wyth Doct. Cranmer and Master Latimer, which because they be somewhat long here to be inserted, and because I see thys volume swelleth already with aboundance of other matter, and partly also for that the same be expressed before in our former edition, page. 1285. MarginaliaRead in our former edition. pag. 1285. I thought good eyther to referre the Reader to the same: or els to differre him tyll the latter end of this volume, where in the Appendix God wylling, both this and other diuers omissions and treatises shall be supplyed.

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In the meane tyme it shall content the Reader for thys present to haue certayne of his letters, with a few other writinges of hys, which wee thought here to adioyne vnto the story of hys lyfe aboue described, before we come to the death and burning of hym and Master Latimer together: the order and prosecuting of which his letters here vnder begynneth.

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¶ Here followeth the Letters of the Reuerend Bishop and Martyr Nicholas Ridley. 
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The Letters of Nicholas Ridley

None of these letters appeared in the Rerum, but this may have been due to the pressure on Foxe to finish the Rerum in time for the Frankfurt book fair in September 1559. (It is worth noting that Foxe printed one of Ridley's 'farewell' letters in November 1559, but he did not print it in the Rerum). In any case, out of the ten letters of Ridley's which Foxe printed - this does not count the two 'farewell' letters - six first appeared in the 1563 edition. The remaining four letters were first printed in the Letters of the Martyrs and added to the 1570 edition. These letters were reprinted in the 1576 and 1583 editions without change.

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¶ A letter sent from B. Ridley and his prison fellowes, vnto M. Bradford, and hys prison fellowes in the Kings Bench in Southwarke. an. 1554. 
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Ridley was moved from the Tower to Oxford in March 1554; this letter was written after 8 May of that year. This letter was first printed in the 1563 edition, then in Letters of the Martyrs (pp. 58-60).

MarginaliaA letter of B. Ridley to Master Bradford, & others.WEll beloued in CHRIST our Sauiour, wee all wyth one hart wish to you, with al those that loue God in deede and truth, grace and health, and specially to our dearely beloued companions which are in CHRISTES cause, and the cause both of their brethren and of their own saluation, to put their necke wyllingly vnder the yoke of CHRISTES crosse. How ioyfull it was to vs to heare the report of D. Tailour and of his godly confession. &c. 

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This is a reference to the letter of 8 May 1554 sent by Rowland Taylor and other imprisoned protestants to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (see 1563, pp. 1001-03;1570, pp. 1640-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400 and 1583, pp. 1469-71).

I ensure you it is hard for me to expresse. Blessed be God, which was and is the geuer of that, and of all godly strength and stomacke in the tyme of aduersitie. As for the rumors that haue or do go abroad, eyther of our relenting or Massyng, MarginaliaFalse reports spred by the policie of the Papistes. wee trust that they which know God, and their dutie towardes their brethren in CHRIST, will not bee to light of credence. For it is not the sclaunderers euill toung, but a mans own euyll deede that can with God defile a man: & therefore with Gods grace, ye shall neuer haue other cause to do otherwise then ye say ye do, that is not to doubt, but þt we wil, by Gods grace, continue. &c. Like rumour as you haue heard of our comming to London, hath bene here spread of the comming of certaine learned men prisoners, hyther from London: but as yet we knowe no certaintye whether of these rumours is, or shalbe more true. Know you, that we haue you in our dayly remembraunce, and wish you and all the rest of our foresayd companions, well in CHRIST.

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It should do vs much cōfort, if we might haue knowledge of the state of the rest of our most dearely beloued, which in this troublesome time do stand in CHRISTES cause, and in the defence of the truth thereof. Somewhat we haue heard of Master Hopers matter: 

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I.e., situation.

but of the rest neuer a deale. We long to heare of father Crome, Doctor Sandys, M. Saunders, Veron, Beacon, MarginaliaThis letter semeth to be written a litle before, or about the time of the burning of Master Rogers.Rogers. 
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Edward Crome had been imprisoned in the Fleet since January 1554; he would recant and be released around February 1555. Edwin Sandys had been imprisoned since January 1553, but was released in the spring of 1554 and arrived in Antwerp in May. Laurence Saunders had been imprisoned since October 1553. Jean Veron had been imprisoned since August 1553; he would remain in prison throughout Mary's reign. Thomas Becon had been imprisoned in the Tower since August 1553, buthe was released on 24 March 1554 and fled to Stasbourg. John Rogers was placed under house arrest in July 1553 and committed to Newgate in January 1554.

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&c. We are in good health, thākes be to God, and yet the maner of our entreating  
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Treatment.

doth chaunge as sower ale doth in summer. It is reported to vs of our keepers, that the Vniuersity beareth vs heauely.  
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Oxford University paid for the maintenance of Ridley, Cranmer and Latimer. Ridley is saying that it was expensive for Oxford to pay for the upkeep of the three prisoners.

MarginaliaWhat so euer fault is done, the cause is layd vpon the poore christians.A coale chaunced to fall in the night out of the chimney, and burnt a hole in the floore, and no more harme was done, the Bailiffes seruauntes sytting by the fier. An other night there chaūced (as master Bailiffes tolde vs) a drunken fellowe to multiply

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