Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1998 [1959]

Queene Mary. Contradictions, Absurdities, Errours, Mutabilitie in Ste. Gardiner.

Marginalia1555. October.To these notes and places of Doct. Ridley, let vs also adioyne other 12. places or Articles of the lyke affinitie, taken out of hys booke called the examination of the proud hunter noted in the latter end of D. Turners second course. 

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I.e., the second part of William Turner, The rescuinge of the romish fox.

By these articles it may appeare how this Byshop swarueth no lesse from the sound truth of CHRISTES Gospel, then he dyd in the other both from hym selfe, and also from other hys felow brethren of hys own Catholicke mother Church of Rome. The Articles in summe are these.

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MarginaliaAlledged out of the booke of Doctour Turner intituled: The Rescuer of the Romishe Foxe.¶ Twelue new found Articles of Steuen Gardiners Crede taught in his booke called the examination of the hunter. 
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William Turner, The rescuynge of the romish fox other wyse called theexamination of the hunter (London: 1545), STC 24355. Foxe prints a digest of statements attributed to Gardiner from throughout the second part of this book.

1. THe ceremonies and traditions which the Byshop of Rome hath ordeyned, and are now allowed in England, are the pale of the Church of England. fol. 7.

2. The Popes ceremonies & traditions, are good and politicke lawes, wherby God hath enclosed the kynges subiectes vnder his Maiestie alone. ibidem.

MarginaliaOne vsurper well compared with an other.3. As kyng Richard an euill man made a good politicke law for the body and common wealth of England: so cā the Pope an euill man make good lawes and holesome doctrine for mans soule and CHRISTES Church. fol. 23.

4. * Marginalia* Note here blasphemous Winchest. preferring the wordes spoken by man before Christes doctrine. What soeuer is good spoken and vsed by man, is much more of God then CHRISTES doctrine is his fathers doctrine. fol. 33

5. He that sayth that the law of the Gospell ought only to be holden in CHRISTES Church & is sufficiēt alone for it, speaketh so farre out of reason that he is not worthy to be reasoned withall. fol. 37.

6. They that hold that the crosse of siluer or gold ought not to be worshipped with kyssyng of it and bowyng & kneelyng to it, are enemyes of CHRISTES true Crosse, and take away the meanes that might set out the glory of CHRISTES Crosse. fol. 49.

7. Neither Paul nor the Crosse can be worshipped with godly honor. fol. 61.

8. As CHRIST vsed clay for an instrument to heale the blind mans eyes withall, MarginaliaChrist neuer made clay to be an instrument for saluation of mans soule. and hath saued diuerse by faith and made it an instrumēt of saluation, and as God hath ordeined Timothe to be an instrument of saluation both to hym selfe and for other, so may the Pope ordeine holy water to be an instrument of saluation both of body and soule to all them that are sprinkled with it. fol. 64.

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MarginaliaEuen like both.9. No man can commit Idolatry with his body alone and in onely kissyng of an Image or Idole, and in onely kneelyng to it can no Idolatrie be committed. fol. 52.

10. For as much as God vnderstandeth them that syng in Latin, though they vnderstand not them selues theyr prayer is acceptable before God. fol. 76.

11. As a father may forbyd certaine of his children to mary, so may a kyng in his kyngdome forbyd certaine of hys subiectes to mary, that is to say, all the Priestes of his Realme. fol. 83.

MarginaliaThe B. of Winchest. Master of ceremonies.12. He that would take away the Popes ceremonyes out of the Church, should driue away all godlynes and semelines, all religious and deuout behauiour out of the Church. fol. 95.

Here hast thou (good Reader) this stout Prelate of Winch. with all hys properties, doinges, and qualities as in a certaine Anatomie proportioned out vnto thee, wherby thou mayst boldly iudge (and nothyng erre in thy iudgement) what is to be esteemed of hym by hys fruites: as who neither was true Protestant nor right Papiste: neither constant in hys error, nor yet stedfast in þe truth: neither frend to the Pope, and yet a perfect enemy to CHRIST: false in kyng Henryes tyme, a dissembler in kyng Edwardes tyme, double periured, and a murderer in Queene Maryes tyme, mutable and inconstant in all tymes. And finally, MarginaliaThe B. of Winchest. Falsely pretendeth the fauour of K. Henry towards hym.where in hys letters to the Lord Protectour 

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Edward Seymour, duke of Somerset, who was Lord Protector during the first part of Edward VI's reign.

and others, vsually he vaunteth so much of his late soueraigne Lord kyng Henry the viij. and of the great reputation that he was in with him, read I besech you, and behold in the depositions of the Lord Paget in the old booke,  
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I.e., the 1563 edition.

pag. 806. col. 1. and also in the depositions of the Earle of Bedford pag. 824. and there ye shal see that the kyng before his death, both excepting him out of hys Pardons and quite strikyng him out of his last will and Testament, so detested and abhorred him, as he dyd no English mā

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more. And where as the Lord Paget being sent in message from the kyng to the Byshop by other wordes thē the kynges mynde and will was, of his owne dexteritie gaue to him good and gracious wordes, which in deede the king neither knew nor yet were sent by him: the B. persuadyng him selfe otherwise of the kynges fauour towardes him then it was in deede, was therin farre deceaued, and brought into a fooles Paradise: wherof read both in the old booke before, pag. 806. 824 and also in this present volume. pag. 1478.

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To describe and paynt out the MarginaliaWinchester vnstable in religion.vnstable mutablilitie of this Byshop aforesayd, albeit here neede no more to be added besides that whiche is already declared: yet notwithstandyng, seyng the matter is not long, it shall not be out of the way to annexe withall vnto the premisses a peece of Drianders letter MarginaliaRead in the former edition pag. 802. written to one Crispine Phisition in Oxford, sent frō Antwerpe, concernyng the doynges and behauiour of this Byshop of Wynchester, whose story we haue now in hand. The copy of which Drianders letter written to the sayd Crispine his frend, beginneth thus.  

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In the 1563 edition, this letter was printed in Book IX (pp. 802-03) and it was moved to Book XI in the 1570 edition. For a complete discussion of this letter see Ignacio J. Garcia Pinilla and Jonathan L. Nelson, 'Una carta de Franciso de Enzinas (Dryander) en el martyrologio de John Foxe', Bibliothéque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 61 (1999), pp. 515-28.

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¶ Doctissimo viro, Edmundo Crispino amico integerrimo, Oxoniæ 
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Francis Driander
Foxe text Latin

Doctissimo, viro, Edmundo Crispino amico integerrimo, Oxoniae. Ante meam ex Lutetia profectionem, dedi literas ad te per Anglum illum, communem amicum nostrum. &c.

[Wade]/Foxe text translation

[To a most learned man, my very close friend, Edmund Crispin, at Oxford.] Before my departure from the City of Paris, I wrote vnto you by our frend the Englishman. &c.

[For the complete Latin letter, see Book IX (not yet available).

Cf. Cattley-Pratt, VI, p. 139]

ANte meam ex Lutetia profectionem, dedi literas ad te per Anglum illum, communem amicum nostrum. &c. 

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Francis Driander
Foxe text Latin

Doctissimo, viro, Edmundo Crispino amico integerrimo, Oxoniae. Ante meam ex Lutetia profectionem, dedi literas ad te per Anglum illum, communem amicum nostrum. &c.

[Wade]/Foxe text translation

[To a most learned man, my very close friend, Edmund Crispin, at Oxford.] Before my departure from the City of Paris, I wrote vnto you by our frend the Englishman. &c.

[For the complete Latin letter, see Book IX (not yet available).

Cf. Cattley-Pratt, VI, p. 139]

¶ The English wherof, as much as to the present purpose appertaineth, here foloweth translated.

MarginaliaA letter of Driander to one Crispine, reporting the doinges of the Bishop of Winchester at Louane.BEfore my departure from the City of Paris, I wrote vnto you by our frend the Englishman. &c.

Now you shalbe contented onely with the narration of your Bishop of Winchester, who (as apparteined to þe Ambassadour of so noble a Prince) came to Louane with a great brauery, and was there receiued at one Ieremyes house nd most honourably enterteined: where the faculty of Diuines for honor sake presēted him wyne in the name of the whole Vniuersitie. But our famous Doctours & learned Masters, for that they would more deepely search and vnderstand the learnyng and excellēcy of the Prelate, perused and scanned a certain Oration made by hym & now extāt, intituled De vera obediētia, in the which hys Oration he dyd impugne the supremacie of the B. of Rome, & preferred his Lordes & kinges authoritie before þe holy Apostolicke Sea, as they terme it: which beyng read & considered by thē, they did not only repēt thē for giuing him such honor, but also recāted that which they had done: & did not so much honor him afore, but now they were as earnest & as spitefull against him. Richard Lathomus, interpreter of termes, with þe fauorers of that fraternitie, and other champions of the fallyng church, disputed with him concernyng the Popes supremacy. MarginaliaB. Gardiner defendeth his booke De vera obedientia at Louane.The Byshop stoutly defended his sayd Oration. The Diuines contrary stiffly mainteined their opiniō, & diuers times opēly with exclamatiōs called the sayd Bishop an excōmunicate person, & a Scismaticke, MarginaliaWinchester compted for an excommunicate and a schismaticke, at Louaue. to no litle reproch and infamy of the English nation. The Byshop not long after, mindyng to say Masse in S. Peters church, they did deny vnto him, as to an excōmunicate person, þe ornamentes and vestimentes meete for the same, where with he beyng highly offended, sodaynly hastened hys iorney from thence. The Deane the next day after made an eloquent Oration, wherein he openly disgraced and diffamed hym. You haue heard now a true story, for our Doctour was a beholder of the whole tragedy. &c.

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And this now beyng sufficient for Gardiners story to leaue hym to hys iudge, and to let hym go, we will returne & proceede (by the grace and leaue of the Lord) as the course of these doulfull dayes shall lead vs, to prosecute the residue of CHRISTES Martyrs, as now in order foloweth.

MarginaliaNouēb. 30. M. Webbe. George Roper, Gregory Parke, Martyrs. The burnyng of Iohn Web gentleman, George Roper, and Gregory Parke, at Caunterbury, as foloweth. 
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The Martyrdoms of Webb, Roper and Park

There is a note in the Rerum that Webb, Roper and George 'Pictor' wereburned at Canterbury in October 1555 (Rerum, p. 538). Foxe printed the account of the trial in the 1563 edition; this was clearly derived from oral sources, not from official records. In the 1570 edition, Foxe added the story of Roper leaping on his way to the stake; this was also derived from oral sources. There were no further changes to this account in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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NExt after the death and constant Martyrdome of the two most worthy champions and standerd-

bea-
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