Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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2068 [2029]

Queene Mary. Thomas Browne. Iohn Tudson. Iohn Went. Martyrs.

Marginalia1556. Ianuary.steppes. But God is to be praysed, that although we read of fewe or none among that sort that dyed as hee did: MarginaliaA commendation of Lawyers.yet good wittes do spring vp dayly of the same profession, to such towardnes and Godly zeale, that some hope already appeareth, shortly to come to passe, þt this godly Phenix shal not flye alone. These foresayd notes and gatherings of his out of the Doctours, were takē from hym by Boner, being found about hym, which was to hym no litle griefe. He among the rest was first apprehended, but last of them condemned, which was the. xv. day of Ianuary, and afterward burned wyth the other Martyrs, the. 27. of the same moneth. 

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The date of the execution of Whittle, Green and the others has been disputed. The normally reliable London diarist Henry Machyn states that it took place on 22 January (The Diary of Henry Machyn, ed. J. G. Nichols, Camden Society, original 42 [1848], p. 99). The chronicler Charles Wriothesley supports Foxe in stating that Whittle and the others were executed on 27 January. The dates of two of Green's letters further confirm the date of 27 January as that of his execution.

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MarginaliaEx Regist.

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3. Thomas Browne, Martyr. 
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Thomas Brown

Brown's death was merely listed in the Rerum (p. 634). This account of Brown and his martyrdom was first printed in the 1563 edition and substantially unchanged in subsequent editions. It is based entirely on official records, now lost, of Brown's trial.

MarginaliaTho. Browne, Martyr. MarginaliaIanuary. 27.THomas Browne, borne in the parysh of Histon within the dioces of Ely, came afterward to London, where he dwelled in the parish of S. Brides in Fleetestreet, a maryed man, of the age of. 37. yeares: who because hee came not to hys parish church, was presented by the Constable of the parish to Boner. MarginaliaThomas Browne presented by the Constable of Saint Brides. As touching whose articles, wher upon hee was examined by the sayd Boner, wyth hys answers also annexed to þe same, mention goeth before, as in the generall processe of hym & of the rest, may appeare. This Thomas Browne beyng had to Fulham, wyth the other there to be examined, was required vpon Thursday, being the. xxvj. day of Septēber, to come into the Chappell to heare Masse, which he refusing to do went into the warren, and there kneeled among the trees. MarginaliaBrowne kneleeth among the trees at the masse time. For this he was greatly charged of the bishop, as for an haynous matter, because he sayd it was done in despite and contempt of their Masse: which seemed to the bishop and hys Chaplaines no small offence. At length beyng producted to hys last examination before the sayd bishop the. xv. day of Ianuary, there to heare þe sentēce diffinitiue against him, first he was requyred wyth many faire wordes and glosing promises to reuoke hys doctrine, to whom the foresayd bishop speaking these wordes, said: MarginaliaB. Boners wordes to Thomas Browne.Browne, ye haue bene before me many times and oft, and I haue trauailed with thee to wyn thee from thine errours: yet thou and such lyke haue and do report, that I go about to seke thy blood. &c.

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MarginaliaB. Boner charged to be a bloodsucker.To whom the sayd Thomas Browne aunswered agayne: yea my Lord (sayd he) in deede ye be a bloudsucker, and I would I had as much bloud, as is water in the Sea, for you to sucke.

Boner then proceeding to the articles, when hee had red them vnto hym agayne, as hee had done diuers times before, asked him whether hee was content and wylling to relinquish those hys heresies and erronious opinions (as hee called them) and returne agayne vnto the vnity of the catholicke fayth. Wherunto he made answer again, saying: MarginaliaThe answere of Thomas Browne to Bishop Boner.If they were heresies, he would forsake them. They be heresies (quoth the Bishop.) How wyll ye proue it, sayd Browne? for I wyll not go from myne aunswers, except you can proue them to be heresies, which ye shall neuer do. For that which you call heresie, is no heresie. With that Boner not able, or els not disposed to supply the part of a sufficient teacher, in prouing that which the other had denyed by good authority and doctrine of the scripture, went about with words and promise of pardon, to allure him to renoūce those his heresies, as he called them, & to returne vnto the vnitie of his mother the Catholicke church. &c.

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To whom the sayd Thomas inferred agayne, as foloweth: Proue it (sayd he) to be heresie, that I do hold and mayntayne, and I wyll turne to you. But you cōdemne me, because I wyll not confesse and beleue the bread in the sacrament of the aultar (as you cal it) to be the body of CHRIST, and therefore ye spyll myne and such like innocents bloud, being the Queenes true subiectes, for the which you shall aunswer, and that shortly.

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After this being spoken, Boner as he had done to the other before, MarginaliaSentence red against Thomas Browne.red in writing the sentence diffinitiue against him. The copy & forme of which sentence wherwith the Papists were wont to condemne all the innocēt saintes of CHRIST, is aboue expressed, pag. 1661. And so this done, he was cōmitted vnto the Shieriffes to bee had away, and burned the. xxvij. day of the sayd moneth of Ianuary, 

Commentary  *  Close

The date of the execution of Whittle, Green and the others has been disputed. The normally reliable London diarist Henry Machyn states that it took place on 22 January (The Diary of Henry Machyn, ed. J. G. Nichols, Camden Society, original 42 [1848], p. 99). The chronicler Charles Wriothesley supports Foxe in stating that Whittle and the others were executed on 27 January. The dates of two of Green's letters further confirm the date of 27 January as that of his execution.

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cōstantly abiding, with the other, the Popes tormentes for the true confession of hys Christian fayth.

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4. Iohn Tudson, Martyr. 
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John Tudson

Tudson's death was merely listed in the Rerum (p. 634). This account of his martyrdom was first printed in 1563 and remained substantially unchanged. It was based entirely on official records, now lost, of his trial.

THe same day and tyme, MarginaliaIohn Tudson, Martyr. MarginaliaIanuary. 27. when the foresayd Tho. Browne with his felowes was condemned (as is aboue rehearsed) beyng the xv. day of Ianuary, was also producted Ioh. Tudson with the rest of the sayd company, vnto the lyke condemnation. This Iohn Tudson was borne in Ipswich in the County of Suffolke, after that apprentise in London dwelling with one George Goodyere of the parish of Saint Mary Botulph, within the dioces of London, who being complayned of to Sir Richard Cholmley and Doct. Story was by them sent vnto Boner Bishop of London, and was diuers times before him in examination.

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The MarginaliaOf these Articles read before pag. 2015.Articles and interrogatories ministred vnto hym, as vnto the rest, before are specified, with his aunsweres also to the same annexed. &c. After this he was brought vnto the open Consistory: where the said blessed and true seruaunt of the Lord Iohn Tudson, appearing before the sayd Bishop and his complices, was moued with sondry persausions (as their maner is) to go from his opinion (which they named heresy) and to persist in the vnity of the Church which they were of. MarginaliaThe constant persisting of Ioh. Tudson.But he cōstantly persisting in that which he had receiued by the Preachers in king Edwardes time, refused so to doe, saying there was no heresy in his aunswers. For I (sayd he) defye all heresy. The Bishop yet still vsed his olde accustomed persuasions to remoue hym, promising moreouer all his offenses and errours, (as he called them) to be forgeuen hym, if he would returne. &c. Then sayd Tudson: Tell me wherein I haue offended, and I will returne. Then sayd the Byshop: In your aunswers. No, sayd Tudson againe, I haue not therein offended: and ye, my Lord pretend charity, but nothing therof appeareth in your workes. Thus after a few words the Byshop did lykewyse promulgate against hym sentence of condemnation MarginaliaSentence red agaynst Ioh. Tudson.which beyng red, the Godly and constant Martyr was committed to the secular power, and so with much pacience finished this lyfe with the other aboue named, the xxvij. day of Ianuary. 

Commentary  *  Close

The date of the execution of Whittle, Green and the others has been disputed. The normally reliable London diarist Henry Machyn states that it took place on 22 January (The Diary of Henry Machyn, ed. J. G. Nichols, Camden Society, original 42 [1848], p. 99). The chronicler Charles Wriothesley supports Foxe in stating that Whittle and the others were executed on 27 January. The dates of two of Green's letters further confirm the date of 27 January as that of his execution.

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5. John Went, Martyr. 
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John Went

Went's death was merely listed in the Rerum (p. 634). This account was first printed in the 1563 edition and it remained substantially unchanged through subsequent editions. It was based entirely on official records of Went's trial.

MarginaliaIohn Went. Martyr. MarginaliaIanuary. 27.IOhn Went borne in Langham in Essex, within the Dioces of Lōdon, of the age of. 27. and a Shereman by occupation, first was examined (as partly is touched before) by Doct. Story vpon the Sacrament of his Popish altar, and because the poore man did not accord with him throughly in the reall presence of the body & bloud of CHRIST, the sayd Story did send hym vp to Boner B. of London. Who likewise after diuers examinations vpō the Articles aforesayd in the Cōsistory, attempted the lyke maner of persausiōs with him, as he did with the other to recant and returne. To whom in few wordes the sayd Went aunswered agayne, he would not, but that by the leaue of God, he would stand firme and constāt in that he had sayd. And when the Byshop yet notwithstandyng did still vrge and call vpon hym with wordes and fayre gloses, to geue ouer him selfe to their opiniō,

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