Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 45. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 46. John Aleworth 47. Martyrdom of James Abbes 48. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 49. Richard Hooke 50. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 51. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 52. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 53. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 54. Martyrdom of William Haile 55. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 56. William Andrew 57. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 58. Samuel's Letters 59. William Allen 60. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 61. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 62. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 63. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 64. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 65. Cornelius Bungey 66. John and William Glover 67. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 68. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 69. Ridley's Letters 70. Life of Hugh Latimer 71. Latimer's Letters 72. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed73. More Letters of Ridley 74. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 75. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 76. William Wiseman 77. James Gore 78. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 79. Philpot's Letters 80. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 81. Letters of Thomas Wittle 82. Life of Bartlett Green 83. Letters of Bartlett Green 84. Thomas Browne 85. John Tudson 86. John Went 87. Isobel Foster 88. Joan Lashford 89. Five Canterbury Martyrs 90. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 91. Letters of Cranmer 92. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 93. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 94. William Tyms, et al 95. Letters of Tyms 96. The Norfolk Supplication 97. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 98. John Hullier 99. Hullier's Letters 100. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 101. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 102. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 103. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 104. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 105. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 106. Gregory Crow 107. William Slech 108. Avington Read, et al 109. Wood and Miles 110. Adherall and Clement 111. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 112. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow113. Persecution in Lichfield 114. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 115. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 116. Examinations of John Fortune117. John Careless 118. Letters of John Careless 119. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 120. Agnes Wardall 121. Peter Moone and his wife 122. Guernsey Martyrdoms 123. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 124. Martyrdom of Thomas More125. Examination of John Jackson126. Examination of John Newman 127. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 128. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 129. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 130. John Horne and a woman 131. William Dangerfield 132. Northampton Shoemaker 133. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 134. More Persecution at Lichfield
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2166 [2127]

Queene Mary. Persecution in Garnesey. Katherine, Guillemine, and Perrotine, Martyrs.

Marginalia1556. Iuly.and to make him one among the elect that shalbe saued.

The morow they both remayned and kept house with no small grief of consciēce waytyng and lookyng with feare, whē to be sent for to the Bishop, rather thē offeryng their diligence to kepe the Byshops appointment, but God so wrought that when the tyme drew neare that they feared callyng forth, MarginaliaGods prouidence in sending away the Byshop.the bels ronge for the byshops departure out of the towne. 

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Bishop Hopton seems to have left Ipswich in considerable haste. Was he troubled by the resistance he encountered during his visitation?

For the which they were not onely glad, but also many a good hart in Ipswiche reioysed and gaue thankes to God. God for hys mercy graunt that our sinne neuer deserue to prouoke Gods ire, that the lyke dayes come agayne. And if it so do, God make them, with all other weakelynges, strong and worthy souldiours to incoūter with the ghostly enemies, the world, the flesh, and the deuill. And boldly to stand to the confession of CHRIST, and of his Gospell, saying with the Apostles: Whether it be right in the sight of God, that we should obey you more then God, iudge ye. MarginaliaTestified and recorded by Peter Moone.

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A tragicall, lamentable, and pitifull hystory, full of most cruell and tyrannicall murder, done by the pretensed Catholiques, vpon thre women and an Infant: to wytte, the mother, her ij. daughters, and the child, in the Isle of Garnesey, for Christes true Religion, the yere of our Lord. 1556. Iuly. 18. 
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The Guernsey Martyrs

Almost from the moment it was printed, the veracity of Foxe's account of this horrible episode was challenged. The reader seeking to understand both this episode, and the context in which it occurred, can do no better than consult D. M. Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 1996), esp. pp. 55-83.

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Foxe's basic account of this tragedy first appeared in the 1563 edition. It was based on the petition of Mathieu Cauches (the brother of Catherine Cauches) made to the privy council asking for the punishment of those who burned his sister and his nieces (see Cal. of State Papers Domestic Add. VI, p. 484). Someone on the privy council, probably William Cecil, supplied Foxe with a copy of this document.

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In 1567, the catholic polemicist Thomas Harding printed a brief but stinging attack on Foxe's account of the incident, which accused Foxe of lying and the three women who were executed as being immoral criminals who received a deserved punishment (Thomas Harding, The Reiondre to Mr Jewels replie against the sacrifice of the Masse [Louvain: 1567], STC 12761, fos. 184r-185v).

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In the 1570 edition, Foxe responded to this, first by adding additional documentation, which confirmed the accuracy of his first account. (It also enabled him to add the names of the martyred women and of Jacques Amy). Most of this documentation sprang from the successful efforts of Thomas Effart, a Guernsey jurat (one of twelve people who, under the baliff, formed Guernsey's royal court, which administered the internal affairs of the island) to secure a pardon for JacquesAmy and the other officials responsible for the burnings, and from the pardon itself. In response to Harding's claims that Massy was unmarried and her son illegitimate, Foxe obtained testimony from a Huguenot minister living in London who had conducted Massy's marriage. (This, by the way, is a good example of the ways in which catholic attacks on the first edition spurred Foxe on to greater research). Foxe then added a direct rebuttal of Harding's arguments.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of iij. women with a young Infant, burnt in the Isle of Garnesey. MarginaliaIuly. 18.AMong all & singular hystories touched in this booke before, as there be many pitifull, diuers lamentable, some horrible and tragical: so is there none almost either in cruelty to be compared 

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This is a rare example of the language of a passage being less restrained in the 1570 edition than in the 1563 edition; this is another result of Foxe responding to Harding.

or so farre of from all compassion and sense of humanitie, as this mercyles fact of the Papistes, done in the Isle of Garnesey, vpon three wemen and an infant, whose names be these, as folow.

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Katherine Cawches, the mother.
Guillemine Gilbert, the daughter.
Perrotine Massey, the other daughter.
An Infant, the sonne of Perrotine.

But before I come to the purpose of this story, it shalbe necessary, for the better explaning of the matter, to begyn first with the circumstances, whereupon the first originall & occasion dyd rise of this tragicall cruelty. The case was this.

The xxvij. day of May, an. 1556. in the Isle of Garnsey, which is a mēber of Englād, in a town there called S. Peters Port, was a noughty womā named Vincēt Gosset, who beyng euill disposed, went (the day aforesayd) to the house of one Nicolas le Conronney, dwellyng in the towne of the sayd S. Peters Porte, about x. of the clocke at night, and there takyng the key of the house (lying vnder the doore) entred into a chamber toward the streete, where she espyeng a cuppe of siluer within a cuphord, tooke it away, and so conueyed her selfe out of the house agayne. MarginaliaThe first occasion of the trouble of these women.Who immediatly after this fact done, (whether by counsell or by what occasiō els, I haue not to say) brought the sayd cup to one Perrotine Massey, an honest woman, dwellyng in the sayd towne, desiryng her to lend her. vj. d. vpon the same.

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Perrotine seyng the cup or goblet, and suspecting (as truth was) the same to be stollen, aunswered that she would not take it: yet neuertheles hauyng knowledge of the owner thereof, tooke it, to restore it agayne to whom it dyd appertayne, and to the ende she should not cary it to an other, gaue her then presently vj. d. Where moreouer is to be noted, that Thomas Effart sayth and testifieth, 

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This passage, added in 1570, is a good example of Foxe finding information which cleared the three executed women in Effart's attempt to secure a pardon for the officials who condemned them. In the 1563 edition, Foxe merely said that Conronney suspected Gosset; he did not say that Massy informed on Gosset to Conronney.

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that knowledge was giuen by the sayd Perrotine to Conronney touchyng the stealyng of his peece, who eftsoones vpon the myssing therof attached þe said Vincent Gosset of the trespasse. Who being apprehended & examined vpon þe same, immediatly confessed the fact, desiryng to haue one sent with her (which was Collas de Loutre) with vj. d. to fette agayne the goblet, where it was: And so did.

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The next day folowyng, the kynges officers beyng informed of the premisses by one MarginaliaNicho. Cary Constable, accuser.Nicolas Carye of the sayd towne Constable, assembled the Iustices there, to inquire and examine further, as well vpon that fact of Vincent Gosset, as vppon other griefes and thynges there amisse. So that after declaration made by the officers and the Constable before the Iustice, for that the sayd Constable did reporte to haue found certeine vessell of peuter in the house of the foresayd Perrotine Massey (who then dwelt with her mother Katherine Cawches, and her sister Guillemyne Guilbert) the which vessell dyd beare no marke, and especially for that there was a peuter dishe, wherof the name was scraped out, their bodyes vpon the same were attached, MarginaliaKatherine with her two daughters, imprisoned in the Castle.and put in prison, and their moueable goodes taken by Inuentory. Within a fewe dayes after these thinges done and past, these three sely 

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I.e., innocent.

women abydyng thus induraunce in the Castle, made their supplication to the Iustices to haue iustice ministred vnto them, videlicet: If they had offended the law, then to let them haue the law: if not, besechyng to graunt thē the benefite of subiectes. &c. Which supplication put vp, thereupon were they appointed to come to their aūswere the v. day of Iune, in the yeare aforesayd. Vpō which day, after straight examinyng of the matter, and the honest aunsweryng of the cause by the sayd good women, MarginaliaKatherin with her two daughters, stand to the iudgement of their neighbours.at the last they submitted thē to the report of their neighbours, that they were no theeues, nor euil disposed persones, but liued truly and honestly, as became Christiā women to do, the false and vntrue reporte of their accusers notwithstandyng.

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So the cause beyng thus debated, after the inquirie made by the kynges officers, MarginaliaThe three women quit of theft and dishonestie.they were found by their sayd neighbours not giltie of that they were charged with, but had liued alwayes as honest women among them: sauyng only that to the cōmaundementes of holy Church, they had not bene obedient. &c. Vppon this triall, and verdite of the neighbours, it was in fine adiudged, first that the sayd Vincent Gosset, beyng atteinted of felony and condemned for the same should be whipped, and after her eare being nayled to the Pillory should so be banished out of the Isle without further punishment. MarginaliaNew trouble agaynst the three women, for not cōming to the church.And as touchyng the other three women, the mother with her two daughters, for their not comming to the Church, they were returned prisoners agayne into the Castle the first of Iuly. And thus farre concernyng the true discourse of this matter, with all the circumstances and appurtenance of the same in euery poynt as the case stode, accordyng to the faithfull tenour & testimony of the Garnesey men written with their own handes both in the French & English toūg. 

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Foxe added this passage in 1570; it was a response to Harding's attack and was intended to remind his readers and his critics that this account was based on documentary sources.

Wherein you see what false surmised matter was pretended agaynst these women, and nothing proued, and how by the attestation of their neighbours they were fully clered of that fact, and should by the temporall Court haue bene dismissed, had not the spirituall Clergy men pykyng matter of Religion agaynst them, exercised such extremitie in persecuting these miserable prisoners, that in no case they could escape their bloudy handes, till at length they had brought thē (as you shall heare) to their finall end. For after þe time of this declaration aboue mētioned made by the neighbours, wherby they were purged of all other thinges, and beyng then knowen of their not commyng to the Church, the Bailiffes Lieutenaunt & the Iustice, thinkyng the matter not to perteine to thē, but to the Clergy, forthwith wrote their letters or mandate vnder their signes, to þe Deane, whose name was MarginaliaIaques Amye Deane of Garnesey, persecutor.Iaques Amye, & Curates of the sayd Isle: The contentes wherof here foloweth.

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¶ A Letter sent from the Bailiffes Lieutenaunt, and Iurates of Saint Peters Porte, to the Deane and Curates of the Isle of Garnesey.

MAster Deane, and Iustices in your Court and iurisdiction, after all amiable recommēdations, pleaseth you to know that we are informed by the deposi-

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