Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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2196 [2156]

Quene Mary. Persecutiō in Lond. XXij. prisoners. The maner of their bringing vp to Lōdon.
MarginaliaAn. 1557. March. The apprehension of 22. prisoners sent vp together for Gods worde to London, from Colchester. 
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22 Prisoners from Colchester

Much of this account - Kingston's letter to Bonner, the indenture on the delivery of the prisoners and the formal confession of the prisoners - was printed in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition, Foxe added Bonner's letter to Pole, an informal confession of some of the prisoners and the petition of the prisoners. Foxe's sources for the 1563 edition are clearly London diocesan records; for the 1570 edition, he has apparently drawn from the Canterbury records.

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Foxe credits Pole with saving the prisoners, but there are other possible readings of these documents. What is clear is that the Colchester magistrates and Bonner's commissioners had arrested these prisoners and sent them to Bonner in London. Their arrival in the capital created a commotion which greatly worried Bonner. His solution was to have the prisoners taken to Fulham and tried there, but he sought to obtain Pole's permission for this. In the event, the prisoners were released upon making a deliberately vague submission of belief in the eucharist.

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AFter thys bloudy proclamation or commission thus geuē out at London, which was February. 8. the 3. and 4. yeares of the Kyng and Queenes raigne, these new Inquisitours, especially some of them, began to ruffle and to take vppon them not a litle: so that all quarters were ful of persecution, and prisones almost full of prisoners, namely in the dioces of Canterbury, wherof (by the leaue of Christ) we will say more anone.

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MarginaliaPersecution about Colchester.In the meane tyme, about the towne of Colchester the wind of persecutiō began fiercely to ryse: insomuch that xxiij. together men and women were apprehended at one clap, of the which xxiij. one escaped. MarginaliaXXij. for Gods worde apprehended.The other xxij. were driuen vp lyke a flocke of christen lambes, to London, with ij. or iij. leaders with them at most, ready to geue theyr skins to be pluckt of for þe Gospels sake. Notwithstanding the Byshops, afrayd belyke of the nūber, to put so many at once to death, sought meanes to deliuer them, and so they dyd, drawing out a very easy submission for them, or rather suffring thē to draw it out thē selues: notwithstanding diuers of thē afterward were taken agayne and suffered, as hereafter ye shall heare (God willyng) declared. Such as met them by the way comming vp, saw them in the fieldes scattering in such sort as that they might haue easily escaped away. MarginaliaThe aray and order of these xxij. prisoners comming vp to London.And when they entred into the townes, theyr keepers called them agayne into aray, to goe two and two together, hauyng a band or a line going betwene them, they holding the same in theyr handes, hauyng an other corde euery one about hys arme, as though they were tyed. And so were these. 14. men, and 8. women caryed vp to London, the people by the way praying to God for them to geue them strength. At the entring into London, they were pinioned and so came into the city, as the picture here shortly after following wt their names also subscribed, doth describe. But first let vs declare concerning theyr taking and theyr attachers, conteyned in the Commissaryes letter written to Boner: then, the indenture made betwene the Commissioners and the popish Commissary. The letter of the Commissary is thys.

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¶ The letter of the commissary, called Iohn Kingston, written to B. Boner.

AFter my dutie done in receauing and accomplishing your honorable and most louing letters, dated the 7. of August: bee it knowen vnto your Lordship, that the xxviij. of August the MarginaliaLorde of Oxforde, L. Darcy, H. Tyrrell, Ant. Browne, William Bendelowes, Edm. Tyrrell, Ric. Weston, Roger Appleton, Io. Kingstone Commissary, persecutors.Lord of Oxenforde, Lord Darcy, H. Tyrell, A. Brown, W. Bendlowes, E. Tirel, Ric. Westen, Roger Appleton published their commission to sease the landes and tenementes and goodes of the fugitiues, so that the owners should haue neither vse nor commoditie thereof, but by inuentory remayne in safe keeping, vnto the case were determined.

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And also there was likewise proclaimed the Queenes Graces warrant, for the restitution of the church goods within Colchester, and the hundreds thereabout, to the vse of Gods seruice. And then were called the parishes particularly, and the Heretikes partly committed to my examination. And that diuers persons shoulde certifye me of their ornamentes of their Churches, betwixt this and the Iustices next appearaunce, which shalbe on Mighelmasse euen next. And that parish which had presented at two seuerall tymes, to haue all ornamentes, with other thinges in good order, were exonerated for euer, to they were warned againe, and others to make their appearaunce from tyme to tyme. And those names blotted in the indenture, were indited for Treason, fugitiues, or disobedientes, and were putte forth by maister Brownes commaundement. And before the sealing, my Lord Darcy sayde vnto me a part, & maister Bendlowes, that I shoulde haue sufficient tyme to sende vnto your Lordship, yea, if nede were, the Heretikes to remayne in duraunce tyll I had an aunswere from you: yea to the

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Lorde Legates graces commissioners come into the Countrey.

And maister Browne 

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This is Robert Brown, a Colchester alderman and not Sir Anthony Browne, the Essex magistrate who frequently appears in Foxe's pages.

came into my Lord Darcies house and parlour, belong vnto maister Barnaby, before my sayde Lord and all the Iustices, and layde his hand of my shoulder with a smiling countenaunce, and desired me to make his harty commendations vnto your good Lordship, and asked me if I woulde, and I sayde yea, with a good will. Wherefore I was glad, and thought that I should not haue bene charged with so sodayne cariage. But after diner, the Iustices counselled wyth the Bailiffes, and with the Gaolers, and then after toke me vnto them, and made collatiō of the indentures, and sealed: and then maister Browne commaunded me thys after noone, being the. xxx. of August, to goe and receiue my prisoners by and by. And then I sayde, it is an vnreasonable commaundement, for that I haue attended of you here these three dayes, and this Sonday earely I haue sent home my men. Wherefore I desire you to to haue a conuenient time appointed, wherein I may know whether it wil please my Lord my maister to send his commissioners hether, or that I shall make cariage of them vnto his Lordship. Then master Brown. MarginaliaMaister Browne a hoate and hastie iustice in persecuting Gods people. We are certified that the counsel hath written vnto your maister to make speede, and to rid these prisoners out of hande: therefore go receiue your prisoners in hast. Then I. Sir I shall receiue them within these ten dayes. Then maister Browne. The limitation lyeth in vs, and not in you, wherefore get you hence.

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Syr, ye haue indited and deliuered me by this indenture, whose faith or opinions I know not, trusting that ye will graunt me a time to examine them, lest I shoulde punishe the Catholikes. Well sayd mayster Brown, for that cause ye shall haue tyme betwixt this and wednesday. And I say vnto you maister Bailiffes, if he do not receiue them at your handes on wednisday, set opē your dores and let them go.

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Then I My Lord and maisters all, I promise to discharge the towne and countrey of these heretiques within ten dayes. Then my Lord Darcy sayd: Commissary, we do and must all agree in one. Wherefore do you receiue them, on, or before wedensday.

Then I. My Lord, the last I caryed, I was goyng betwixt the Castell, and S. Katherins chappell, two howers and an halfe, and in great presse & daunger: MarginaliaWhat ado is here with the butchers to bryng the poore Lambes to þe Shambles.wherefore this may be to desire your Lordship to geue in commaundement vnto my maister Saier, Baylye here present, for to ayde me through his liberties, not onely with men and weapons, but that the townclarke may be ready there with his booke to write the names of the most busy persons, and this vpon three howers warning, all which both my Lord & maister Browne cōmaunded. And the 31. of August, William Goodwin, of Muchbyrch, husbandman, thys brynger, and Thomas Alsey of Copforde MarginaliaThomas Alsey of Copford Apparitor to Byshop Boner. your Lordships apparitour of your consistory in Colchester, couenaunted wyth me that they should hyre 2. other men at the least, whereof one should be a bowman, to come to me the next day about 2. of the clocke at after noone, so that I might recite this bargayne before maister Archdeacō, and pay þe money, that is, xlvj. shillinges viij. pence. Wherefore they shoulde then goe forth wyth me vnto Colchester, and on Wednisday before three of the clocke in the morning receiue that at my hand within the Castell, and Mote Hall, MarginaliaXXij. pore prisoners in bondes for Christ and hys worde.fourteene men, and eight women, ready bound with giues and hempe, and driue, cary, or leade and fede with meate and drinke, as Heretickes ought to be found cōtinually, vnto such tyme that the sayd William and Thomas, shall cause the sayd xxij. persons for to be deliuered vnto my Lord of Londons officers, and within the safe keeping of my sayd Lorde, and then to bring vnto me agayne the saide Giues, with a perfect token, of, or from my sayd Lorde, and then this couenaunt is voide, or els. &c.

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Maister Bendowes sayd vnto me in my Lorde of Oxenfordes Chamber at the kinges head, after I had sayde Masse before the Lordes, that on the morrow after Holy Roode day, when we shall meete at Chelmesford for the diuision of these landes, I thinke maister Archdeacon, you, and maister Smith shalbe fayne to ride with certayne of the Iury to those porcions and manours in your part of Essex, and in like case deuide our selues, to tread & view the ground with the Quest, or els I thinke the Quest will not labour the matter, and so do you say vnto maister Archdeacon.

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Alice the wife of William Walleys of Colchester, hath submitted herselfe, abiured her erroneous opinions, as-

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