Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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2299 [2259]

Queene Mary. Englishe Martyrs in Spaine. Confessours scourged for Religion.

Marginalia1558.hearyng the Inquisitour cast out a word, that it should be needefull for hym to talke with the prisoner, and beyng thereupon more then halfe persuaded, that at the length they ment good fayth, did so, and repayred thether about the euenyng. MarginaliaIohn Fronton imprisoned by þe Spanish Inquisitors for asking hys owne goods.Immediatly vppon hys commyng, the Iayler was forthwith charged with hym, to shut hym vp close in such a certaine prison, where they appoynted hym.

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The partie hopyng at the first that he had bene called for about some other matter, and seyng him selfe contrary to hys expectation, cast into a darke dungeon, perceaued at the length that the world went with hym farre otherwise then he supposed it would haue done. But within two or three dayes after, he was brought forth into the Court, where he began to demaunde his goods: and because it was a deuise that well serued their turne, without any more circumstāce they bad him say his Aue Maria. The partie began & said it after this maner: Aue Maria gratia plena dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus, & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
John Fronton saying the 'Ave Maria'
Foxe text Latin


Aue Maria gratia plena Dominus tecum, benedicta tua in mulieribus, & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen.
Sancta Maria mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)


Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord be with you, blessed are you among women, and blessed be Jesus, the fruit of your womb. Amen.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.

MarginaliaIohn Fronton iudged an hereticke for not adding to Aue Maria, more then the Scripture hath.The same was written word by word as he spake it: and without any more talke of claiming his goodes because it was booteles, they cōmaund hym to prison agayne, and enter an action agaynst hym as an hereticke, forasmuch as he dyd not say hys Aue Maria after the Romish fashion, but ended it very suspiciously, for he should haue added moreouer: Sancta Maria mater dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus, 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
John Fronton saying the 'Ave Maria'
Foxe text Latin


Aue Maria gratia plena Dominus tecum, benedicta tua in mulieribus, & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen.
Sancta Maria mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)


Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord be with you, blessed are you among women, and blessed be Jesus, the fruit of your womb. Amen.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.

by abbreuiatyng wherof, it was euident enough (sayd they) that he dyd not allow the mediation of Saintes.

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MarginaliaA quarell picked against the English Marchāt, to spoyle him of hys goods.Thus they picked a quarell to detaine him in prison a longer season, and afferwardes brought him forth into their Stage disguised after their maner: where sentence was geuē that he should lose all the goodes which he sued for, though they were not his own, and besides this, suffer a yeares imprisonment.

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The Martyrdome of an other Englishman in Spayne.

MarginaliaAn other English man burnt in Spaine. 

Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of this Englishman, Baker, Burgate, Burges and Hoker first appeared in the 1563 edition and were unchanged in subsequent editions.

AT what tyme this blessed Martyr of Christ suffered, which was the yeare of our Lord, 1560. December. 22. there suffered also an other Englishman, with other 13. one of thē beyng a Nunne, an other a Frier, both constant in the Lord. MarginaliaRead afore pag. 1062.Of which 13. read before, pag. 1062.

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Iohn Baker and William Burgate, Martyrs.

MarginaliaI. Baker, William Burgate, Martyrs in Spaine.IOhn Baker and William Burgate, both Englishmen, in Cales, in the countrey of Spayne, were apprehended, and in the Citie of Siuill burned the second day of Nouember.

Marke Burges, and William Hoker, Martyrs.

MarginaliaMarke Burges burnt in Lushborne.MArke Burges an Englishman, Master of an English Shyp called the Minion, was burned in Lushborne, a Citie in Portingall. an. 1560.

MarginaliaW. Hoker stoned to death in Siuill.William Hoker a young man, about the age of 16. yeares, being an Englishmā, was stoned to death of certaine yoūg men there in the City of Siuill, for the confession of hys fayth. an. 1560.

But of these and such other Actes and matters past in Spayne, because they fell not within the compasse of Queenes Maryes reigne, but since her tyme, an other place shall serue hereafter (þe Lord willing) to entreate more at large of the same, when we come to the yeares and reigne of the Queene that now is, where we haue more conueniently to inferre not onely of these matters of the Martyrs (wherof somewhat also hath bene touched before, pag. 1062. but also of the whole Inqui-

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sition of Spayne, and Plackard of Flaunders, with the tragicall tumultes and troubles happenyng within the last memorie of these our latter dayes, accordyng as it shall please the mercy of the Lord to enable our endeuour with grace and space to the accomplishment therof.

A chapter or treatise concernyng such as were scourged and whipped by the Papistes in the true cause of Christes Gospell. 
Commentary  *  Close
Scourged Protestants

All of these accounts first appeared in the 1563 edition although they were scattered throughout the end of the volume. In the 1570 edition, Foxe brought these accounts together, and rearranged them. He made no substantive change to their contents, however, and they remained unchanged in subsequent editions. Some of these accounts, such as Thomas Greene's and Stephen Cotton's, are autobiographical; others were sent to Foxe by sympathetic informants.

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MarginaliaA chapter concerning such as were scourged for religion.ANd thus through the merciful assistance and fauourable ayde of Christ our Sauiour, thou hast as in a general Register (good Reader) the story collected, if not of all, yet of the most part, or at least, not many I trust omitted, of such good saints and Martyrs as haue lost their lyues, and giuen their bloud, or died in prison for þe testimony of Christes true doctrine and Sacramentes, from the time of the cruell Statute MarginaliaOf this Statute, read before pag. 624. first giuen out by K. Henr. 4. Ex officio. pag. 624. vnto this present tyme, and especially vnder the reigne of Q. Mary. Now after thys bloudy slaughter of Gods good Saintes and seruauntes thus ended and discoursed, let vs procede (by the good pleasure of the Lord) somewhat likewise to entreat of such as for the same cause of Religion haue bene, although not put to death,  

Commentary  *  Close

The preceding passages were added in the 1570 edition and are a response to the criticisms of Nicholas Harpsfield and other catholic polemicists that Foxe glorified as martyrs those who had not suffered a violent death.

yet whipped and scourged by the aduersaries of Gods word, first begynnyng with Richard Wilmot, and Thomas Farefaxe, who about the tyme of Anne Ascue, were pitifully rent and tormēted with scourges and stripes for their faithfull standyng to Christ and to his truth, as by the story and examinatiō both of the sayd Richard Wilmot, and of Thomas Farefaxe now followyng, may appeare.

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¶ The scourging of Richard Wilmot, and Thomas Fayrefaxe.

MarginaliaThe scourging of Richard Wilmot, and Tho. Fayrefaxe.AFter the first recantation of Doct. Crome for his Sermon which he made the fift Sonday in Lent at S. Thomas Acons, beyng the Mercers Chappell, his Sermon was on the Epistle of the same day, written in the x. chap. to þe Hebrues, MarginaliaD. Cromes Sermon. wherin he proued very learnedly by the same place of Scripture and others, that Christ was the onely and sufficient sacrifice vnto God the father, for the sinnes of the whole world, and that there was no more sacrifice to be offered for sinne by the Priestes, for as much as Christ had offered his body on the crosse, and shed his bloud for the sinnes of the people, and that once for all. For the which Sermon he was apprehended of Boner, and brought before Steuen Gardiner and other of the Counsell, where he promised to recant his doctrine at Paules crosse, the second Sonday after Easter. MarginaliaD. Cromes recantation.And accordingly, he was there and preached, Boner with all his Doctours sittyng before hym: but he so preached & handled his matter, that he rather verified his former saying, then denyed any part of that which he before had preached. For the which the Protestantes praysed God, and hartely reioyced.

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But Byshop Boner with his champions, were not therewith pleased, but yet notwithstandyng they had hym home with them, and so handled hym amongest that woluishe generation, MarginaliaD Crome caused to recant the second time.that they made hym come to the crosse agayne the next Sōday. And because the Magistrates should now heare hym, and be witnesses of this recantation, which was most blasphemous, to deny Christes sacrifice to be sufficient for penitent sinners, and to say that þe sacrifice of the Masse was good, godly, and a holy sacrifice, propitiatorie and auaileable both for the quicke and the dead: because (I say) that they would haue the nobles to heare this blasphemous

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