Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
2329 [2289]

Queene Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Q. Maries time.

Marginalia1558.uer she were in. Whereat the Lady beyng agast, went to shew her grace their wordes: but they hastely followyng her, came rushyng as soone as she into her graces chamber vnbydden. MarginaliaThe vnmanerlines of the Knightes.At whose so sodaine commyng into her bed chamber, her grace beyng not a litle amased, sayd vnto them: Is the hast such, that it might not haue pleased you to come to morow in the mornyng?

[Back to Top]

They made aunswere, that they were right sory to see her in that case. And I (quoth she) am not glad to see you here at this tyme of the night. Whereunto they aūswered, that they came from the Queene to do their message and duety, which was to this effect, that the Queenes pleasure was, that she should be at London the vij. day of that present moneth. Wherunto she said: Certes, no creature more glad then I to come to her Maiestie, beyng right sory that I am not in case at this time to waite on her, as you your selues doe see and can well testifie. In deede we see it true (quoth they) that you do say: for which we are very sory. MarginaliaA straite Cōmission from the Queene, to bring þe Lady Elizabeth either quicke or dead.Albeit we let you to vnderstand that our Commission is such, and so straineth vs, that we must needes bryng you with vs either quicke or dead. Whereat she beyng amased, sorowfully sayd that their Commission was very sore: but yet notwithstandyng she hoped it to be otherwise, & not so strait. Yes verely sayd they. Wherupon they callyng for two Phisitions, Doct. Owen and Doct. Wendye, demaunded of them whether she might be remoued from thence with life or no. Whose aunswere and iudgement was, that there was no impediment to their iudgement to the contrary, but that she might trauell without daunger of life.

[Back to Top]

In conclusion, they willed her to prepare against the morning at nine of the clocke to go with them, declaring that they had brought wyth them the Queenes litter for her. MarginaliaThe gentlenes of Q. Mary to send her horselitter to bring her sister to trouble.After much talke, the messengers declaring how there was no prolonging of tymes and dayes, so departed to their chamber, beyng intetayned and cheared as appertayned to their worships.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaLady Elizabeth taketh her iourney toward the Queene.On the next morrow at the tyme prescribed, they had her forth as she was, very faint and feble, and in such case that she was ready to swound iij. or iiij. tymes betwene them. What should I speake here that can not well be expressed, what an heauy house there was to behold the vnreuerēt and doulefull dealing of these men, but especially the carefull feare and captiuitie of their innocent Lady and mistres?

[Back to Top]

Now to proceede in her iourney from Asheridge all sicke in þe litter, she came to Redborne, where she was garded all night: Frō thence to Saint Albons to Syr Rafe Rowlettes house, where she taryed that night, both feble in body and comfortles in mynde. From that place they passed to Master Doddes house at Mimmes, where also they remayned that night, and so from thence she came to Highgate: where she beyng very sicke, taryed that night and the next day. During which tyme of her abode there, came many Purseuantes and messengers from the court: but for what purpose, I can not tell.

[Back to Top]

From that place she was conueyed to the court: where by the way came to meete her many Gētlemen, to accompany her highnes, which were very sory to see her in that case. But especially a great multitude of people there were standyng by the way, who then flocking about her litter, lamented and bewayled greatly her estate. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth brought vp to London.Now, when she came to the court, her grace was there straight wayes shut vp, and kept as close prisoner a fortnight, which was till Palmesonday, seyng neyther King nor Queene, nor Lord, nor frend all that tyme, but onely then the Lord Chamberlaine, Syr Iohn Gage, and the Vicechamberlayne, which were attendant vnto the doores. About which tyme Syr William Sentlow was called before the Counsell. To whose charge was layde that he knew of Wyates rebellion. MarginaliaSyr Will. Sentlow committed to the Tower.Which he stoutly denyed, prote-

[Back to Top]

sting that he was a true mā both to God & his Prince, defying all traytours and rebels: but beyng straitly examined, he was in conclusion cōmitted to þe Tower.

The Friday before Palme sonday, the Byshop of Winchester, with xix. other of the Counsell (who shall be here nameles) came vnto her grace from the Queenes maiestie, MarginaliaLady Elizab. charged with Syr Thomas Wyats conspiracie.and burdened her wyth Wyates conspiracy: which she vtterly denyed, affirming that she was altogether giltles therein. They beyng not contented wyth thys, MarginaliaLady Elizab. charged with the busines of Syr Peter Carew.charged her grace wyth busines made by Syr Peter Carew, and the rest of the gentlemen of the West countrey: which also she vtterly denying, cleared her innocency therein.

[Back to Top]

In conclusion, after long debating of matters, they declared vnto her, that it was the Queenes will and pleasure, MarginaliaLady Elizab. threatned to go to the Tower.that she should go vnto the Tower, whyle the matter were further tryed and examined.

Whereat she beyng agast, sayd that she trusted the Queenes maiesty would be more gracious Lady vnto her, & that her highnes would not otherwise conceiue of her, but that she was a true woman: MarginaliaLady Elizab. purgeth her selfe to the Lordes.declaring furthermore to the Lordes, that she was innocent in all those matters wherein they had burdened her, and desired them therfore to be a further meane to þe Queene her sister, that she beyng a true woman in thought, word, and deede towardes her maiesty, might not be committed to so notorious and doulefull a place, protesting that she would request no mercy at her hand, if she should be proued to haue consented vnto any such kynde of matter as they layde vnto her charge: and therefore in fine desired their Lordships to thinke of her what she was, and that she might not so extremely be delt withall for her truth.

[Back to Top]

Whereunto the Lordes aunswered agayne, that there was no remedy, for that the Queenes maiesty was fully determined that she should go vnto þe tower. Wherewith þe Lordes departed with their caps hanging ouer their eyes. But not long after, within the space of an hower or litle more, came iiij. of the foresayd Lordes of the Counsaile, which were the Lord Treasurer, the Byshop of Winchester, the Lorde Stuarde, the Earle of Sussex, with the Garde, who warding the next chamber to her, MarginaliaLady Elizabethes seruauntes remoued frō her.secluded all her gentlemen and yeomen, Ladyes and gentlewomen, sauing that for one gentleman Vsher, three gentlewomen, and two Groomes of her chamber, were appointed in their roomes three other men of the Queenes, and three wayting women, to geue attendaunce vpon her, MarginaliaThe Queenes men, and wayting women, attendant vpō Lady Elizabeth.that none should haue accesse to her grace. At which tyme there were an hundreth of Northern souldiours in white coates, watching and warding about the gardens all that night, a great fire beyng made in the middest of the hall, and two certayne Lordes watching there also wyth their band and company.

[Back to Top]

Vpon Saterday following, two Lordes of þe Counsell (the one was the Earle of Sussex, the other shall be nameles) 

Commentary  *  Close

This was William Paulet, the Marquis of Winchester (see J. G. Nichols (ed.), The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of Queeen Mary, Camden Society, Original Series 48 [1850], p. 70). William Paulet was still alive when Foxe printed this narrative.

came and certified her grace that forthwith she must go vnto the Tower, the Barge beyng prepared for her, and the tyde now ready, which taryeth for no body. In heauy mode her grace requested the Lordes that she myght tary an other tyde, trusting that the next would be better & more comfortable. MarginaliaThe hard dealing of a certain Lord with the Lady Elizabeth.But one of the Lordes replyed, that neyther tyde nor time was to be delayed. And when her grace requested him that she might be suffered to write to the Queenes maiesty, he aunswered, that he durst not permit that, adding that in hys iudgement it would rather hurt thē profite her grace in so doyng.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Earle of Sussex gentle to the Lady Elizabeth.But the other Lord, more courteous and fauorable (whom was the Earle of Sussex) kneelyng downe, told her grace, that she should haue libertie to write, and as he was a true man he would deliuer it to the Queenes highnes, and bryng an aunswere of the same, what soeuer came therof. MarginaliaLady Elizab. writeth to the Queene, but it would not serue.Wherupō she wrote: albeit she could in no case be suffered to speake with the Queene, to her

[Back to Top]
great
AAAAA.ij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield