Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
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2338 [2298]

Quene Mary. A treatise of Gods seuere iudgement against Persecutors.

MarginaliaAn. 1558.tholicke Clergy? why did they not preuayle with God, if their Religion were so godly as they pretēd? If their Masses Ex opere operato 

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Foxe text narrative
Foxe text Latin

ex opere operato

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

be able to fetch Christ from heauen, and to reach downe to Purgatory, how chaunced then they could not reach to the Queenes chamber, to helpe her in her trauaile, if she had bene with child in dede? if not, how then came it to passe, that al the Catholicke Church of England did so erre, and was so depely deceaued?

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MarginaliaQ. Mary left desolate of K. Phillip her husband.Queene Mary, after these manifold plagues and correctiōs, which might sufficiently admonish her of Gods disfauour prouoked agaynst her, would not yet cease her persecution, but still continued more and more to reuenge her Catholicke zeale vpon the Lordes faithfull people, settyng fire to their poore bodyes by dosens & halfedosens together. Wherupon Gods wrathfull indignation increasing more and more agaynst her ceased not to touch her more nere with priuate misfortunes and calamities. For after that he had takē from her the fruite of children (which chiefly and aboue all thinges she desired) then he bereft her of that, which of all earthly thinges should haue bene her chiefe stay of honour, and staffe of her comfort, that is, withdrew frō her the affection and company of her owne husband, by whose Mariage she had promised before to her selfe whole heapes of such ioy and felicitie: but now the omnipotent gouernour of all thinges so turned the wheele of her own spinnyng agaynst her, that her high buildinges of such ioyes and felicities, came all to a Castlecomedown, her hopes being cōfounded, her purposes disappointed, and she now brought to desolation: who seemed neither to haue þe fauour of God, nor the hartes of her subiectes, not yet the loue of her husband: MarginaliaThe ill lucke of Queene Mary with her husband. who neither had fruite by him while she had him, neither could now enioy him whom she had maried, neither yet was in libertie to mary any other whom she might enioy. Marke here (Christian reader) the wofull aduersitie of this Queene, and learne withall, what the Lord can do whē mans wilfulnes will needes resiste him and will not be ruled.

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MarginaliaThe finall end and death of Q. Marie.At last, when all these fayre admonitions would take no place with the Queene, nor moue her to reuoke her bloudy lawes, nor to stay the tyranny of her Priestes, nor yet to spare her owne subiectes, but that the poore seruauntes of God were drawen dayly by heapes most pitifully as sheepe to the slaughter, it so pleased the heauenly Maiesty of almightie God, when no other remedy would serue, by death to cut her of, which in her life so litle regarded the life of others: giuyng her throne, which she abused to the destruction of Christes Church and people, to an other who more temperatly and quietly could guide the same, MarginaliaQ. Mary reigned v. yeares and v. monethes.after she had reigned here the space of v. yeares and v. monethes. MarginaliaThe shortnes of Queene Maries reigne noted.The shortnes of which yeares and reigne, vnneth we finde in any other story of Kyng or Queene since the conquest or before (beyng come to their owne gouernement) saue onely in kyng Richard the thyrd.

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MarginaliaAn admonitiō to all Christen rulers.And thus much here, as in the closing vp of this story, I thought to insinuate, touching the vnlucky and ruefull reigne of Queene Mary: not for any detractatiō to her place and state Royall, wherunto she was called of the Lord, but to this onely intent and effect, that for somuch as she would nedes set her selfe so confidently to worke and striue agaynst the Lorde and his procedynges, all readers and rulers not onely may see how the Lord did worke agaynst her therfore, but also by her may be aduertised & learne what a perillous thing it is for men or women in authoritie, vpon blinde zeale and opinion, to styrre vp persecution in Christes Church, to the effusion of Christian bloud, lest it proue in the end with them (as it did here) that while they thinke to persecute heretickes, they stumble at the same stone as did the Iewes in persecutyng Christ and his true members to death, to their own confusion and destruction.

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The seuere punishment of Gods mighty hand, vpon Priestes and Prelates, with such other, as haue bene persecutors of his people and the members of hys true Church

MarginaliaA treatise of Gods seuere punishment agaynst cruell persecutors, and enemies to his word. 

Commentary  *  Close

An early version of this section appeared in the 1563 edition; it was more fully developed in the 1570 edition. A few anecdotes were added in the 1576 edition, and additional material was added which was sent to Foxe by John Louth, the archdeacon of Nottingham. This material was supplied to Foxe by individual informants, often acting from self-interested motives of their own.

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LEauyng now Queene Mary, beyng dead and gone, I come to thē which vnder her were the chiefe ministers and doers in this persecutiō, the Byshops (I meane) and Priestes of the Clergy, to whō Queene Mary gaue all the execution of her power, 
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Note that while Foxe blames Mary for her adherance to catholicism and her general policies, he blames the persecution on the clergy.

as did Queene Alexandra to the Phariseis after þe tyme of þe Machabees. Of whom Iosephus thus writeth: MarginaliaIosephus De antiquit. li. 13.Ipsa solum nomen regium ferebat, cæterum omnem regni potestatem Pharisæi possidebant. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Josephus
Foxe text Latin

Ipsa solum nomen regium ferebat, caeterum omnem regni potestatem Pharisaei possidebant.

Foxe text translation

She onely reteined to her selfe the name and title of the kyngdome, but all her power she gaue to the Phariseis to possess &c.

Actual text of Josephus, De antiquit. 13.16. 2 (= XIII. 409)

τὸ μὲν οὖν ὄνομα τῆς βασιλείας εἶχεν αὐτη, τὴν δὲ δύναμιν οἱ Φαρισαῖοι

[Thexαὐτη was Queen Alexandra, widow of Alexander Jannaeus, a Jewish king, who had just died in 79 BC]

That is: She onely reteined to her selfe the name and title of the kyngdome, but all her power she gaue to þe Phariseis to possess &c. Touchyng which Prelates and Priestes, here is to be noted in like sort the wonderfull and miraculous prouidēce of almighty God, which as he abridged the reigne of their Queene, so he suffered them not to escape vnuisited: MarginaliaThe death of Ste. Gardiner.first begynnyng with Steuen Gardiner the Archpersecutour of Christes Church, whom he tooke away about the middest of the Queenes reigne. Of whose poysoned lyfe and stincking end, for so much as sufficient hath bene touched before pag. 1952. I shall not neede here to make any new rehearsall therof.

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MarginaliaGods punishment vpō Doct. Morgan B. of S. Dauies.After him dropped other away also, some before the death of Q. Mary, and some after, as Morgan B. of S. Dauids, who sitting vpon þe cōdemnation of the blessed Martyr Byshop Farrar, and vniustly vsurpyng his rowme, not long after was stricken by Gods hand after such a straunge sort, that his meate would not go downe, but ryse and pycke vp againe, sometyme at his mouth, sometyme blowen out of his nose most horribly to behold, & so he continued till his death. MarginaliaA note of wronge gotten goods.Where note moreouer that when Maister Leyton 

Commentary  *  Close

The conclusion of this story may be fanciful, but Griffith Leyson's seizure of Ferrar's cattle actually occurred (see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar [London: 1997], pp. 346-47).

beyng then Sheriffe at Byshops Farrars burnyng, had fet away the cattell of the sayd Byshop, from his seruauntes house called Matthew Harbottell, into his own custody, the cattell commyng into the Sheriffes ground, diuers of them would neuer eate meate but lay bellowyng and roaryng, and so dyed.

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MarginaliaIustice Morgan stricken with madnes.This foresayd Byshop Morgan aboue mentioned, bringeth me also in remembraūce of Iustice Morgan, who sat vpon the death of the Lady Iane, and not long after the same, fell mad and was bereft of his wyttes, and so dyed, hauing euer in his mouth, Lady Iane, Lady Iane. &c.

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MarginaliaDoctor Dunning a cruell Chauncellor, strickē with sodeine death.Before þe death of Q. Mary, dyed D. Dunnyng the bloudy & wretched Chauncellour of Norwich, who, after he had most rigorously condemned & murthered so many simple and faithfull Saintes of the Lord, continued not long him selfe, but in the middle of hys rage in Queene Maryes dayes dyed in Lincolneshyre beyng sodeinly taken (as some say) sitting in his chayre.

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MarginaliaThe sodein death of Berry a wicked Cōmissary in Northfolke.The like sodein death fell also vpon Berry Commissary in Northfolke, who (as is before shewed in the story of Thomas Hudson) foure dayes after Queene Maries death, when he had made a great feast, and had one of his concubines there, commyng home from the Church after Euensong, where he had ministred Baptisme the same tyme, betwene the Churchyard and his house, sodeinly fell downe to the ground with a heauy grone, and neuer styrred after, neither shewed any one token of repentaunce.

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MarginaliaGods stroke vpō Doctor Thornton Bishop or Suffragan of Douer.What a stroke of Gods hand was brought vpon the cruell persecutour of the holy and harmles Saintes of the Lord, Byshop Thornton, Suffragan of Douer, who after he had exercised his cruell tyranny vppon so many godly men at Canterbury, at length commyng vpon a Saterday from the Chapter house at Canterbury to Borne, & there vpon Sonday followyng, loo-

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kyng
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