Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
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Quene Mary. Examples of Gods punishment vpon Persecutors, & contemners of his Gospell.

MarginaliaAn. 1558.should haue great cheare oftentimes, both at hys owne house and at tauernes: and not long before hys death he was so beastly drunken in a tauerne ouer agaynst hys doore, that he fell downe in the tauerne yarde, and could not arise alone, but lay groueling, till he was holpen vp & so caryed home. MarginaliaLandesdale a feaster of the rich, and vnmercifull to the poore.Thys father of drunkardes, as he was a great feaster of the riche and wealthy of Hackney and others, so his poore neighbours and poore tenauntes fared litle the better for him: except it were with some broken meate, which after hys feastes, hys wife would cary and send vnto them, or some almes geuen at hys doore. Besides all thys, he did much iniurie to his poore neighbours in oppressing the commons neare about hym, which was a speciall reliefe vnto thē, so that hys cattell eate vp all without pitie or mercy.

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MarginaliaPoore Lazarus lying by the rich mans doore.There chaunced after thys about two yeares before he dyed, a poore man, being sicke of the bloudy flixe, for very weaknes, to lye downe in a ditch of the sayd Landesdales, not a stones cast from hys house, where he had a litle straw brought hym. Notwithstanding the sayd Landesdale had backe houses and barnes enow to haue layd hym in, but would not shew hym so much pitie. And thus poore Lazarus there lay night and day, about vj. dayes ere he dyed.

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Certaine good neighbours hearing of this, procured thinges necessary for hys reliefe, but he was so farre spent, that he could not be recouered: who lay broyling in the hoate Sunne with a horrible smell most pitifully to beholde.

Thys poore man a litle before he dyed, desired to be remoued to an other ditch into the shadow. Wherupon one of the neighbours comming to Landesdales wife for a bundell of straw for hym to lie vppon, MarginaliaYet the rich glutton was better, for he suffered Lazarus to lie at hys gates.she required to haue hym remoued to Newington side, because (she sayd) if he should die it would be very farre to cary hym to the Church.

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Besides thys, there was a mariage in thys Landesdales house, and the gestes that came to the mariage gaue the poore man money as they came and went by hym, but Landesdale disdayned to contribute any reliefe vnto hym, notwithstanding that he had promised to Master Searles, one of þe Queenes Garde (who had more pitie of him) to minister to hym things necessary.

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MarginaliaThe death of poore Lazarus in the ditch.To be short, the next day poore Lazarus departed thys life, and was buryed in Hackney Churchyard: Vppon whom Landesdale did not bestow so much as a winding sheete or any thyng els towardes hys buriall. And thus much concerning the end of poore Lazarus. Now let vs heare what became of þe rich glutton.

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About two yeares after thys, the sayd Landesdale being full of drinke (as hys custome was) came ryding in great hast from London on S. Andrewes daye in the euening, an. 1568. and (as is reported by those that saw him) reeling to & fro like a drunkard, with his hatte in hys hand, and cōming by a ditch side, there tumbled headlong into the ditch. MarginaliaThe end of thys vnmercifull Epicure in the ditch.Some say that þe horse fell vpō hym, but that is not like. This is true, the horse more sober then the master, came home, leauing hys master behinde hym. Whether he brake hys necke with the fall, or was drowned (for the water was scarsly a foote deepe) it is vncertaine: but certeine it is, that he was there found dead. Thus he being found dead in the ditch, the Crowner (as the maner is) satte vpon hym: and how the matter was handled for sauing his goods, the Lorde knoweth: but in the end so it fell out, that the goodes were saued and the poore horse indited for hys masters death.

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The neighbours hearing of the death of thys man, and considering the maner thereof, sayd it was iustly fallen vppon hym, that as he suffered the poore man to lye and die in the ditch neare vnto hym, so hys end was to die in a ditch likewise. And thus has thou in thys story (Christen brother and reader) MarginaliaThe image of the rich glutton, and poore Lazarus.the true image of the rich glutton and poore Lazarus, set out before thine eyes, whereby we haue all to learne, what

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happeneth in the end to such voluptuous Epicures and Atheistes, which being voyde of all sense of religion and feare of God, yeld them selues ouer to all prophanitie of life, neyther regarding any honestie at home, nor shewing any mercy to their needy neighbour abroad. Christ our Sauiour sayth: MarginaliaMath. v.Bleßed be the mercifull, for they shall obtaine mercy: but iudgement without mercy shall be executed on them which haue shewed no mercy. &c. And S. Iohn sayth: Marginaliaj. Ioh. iij.He that seeth his brother haue neede, and shutteth vp his compassion from him, how dwelleth the loue of God in him? &c. Againe, Esay against such prophane drunkardes & quaffers thus crieth out: MarginaliaEsay.Woe be vnto them that rise vp early to followe drunkennes, and to them that so continue vntill night, till they be set on fire with wine. In those companies are Harpes and Lutes, Tabyres and Pipes, and wine: but they regard not the workes of the Lorde, and consider not the operation of hys handes. &c. Woe be vnto them that are strong to spue out wine, and expert to set vp drunkennes. &c.

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The punishmētes of thē that be dead, be wholesome documentes to men that be alyue. And therfore as the story aboue exemplified may serue to warne all Courtiers and yeomen of the Gard: so by this that foloweth, MarginaliaA warning to gentlemen.I would wishe all Gentlemen to take good heede and admonition betyme, to leaue their outragious swearing and blaspheming of the Lord their God.

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MarginaliaA fearefull example of Gods punishment vpō a gentleman a great swearer, in Cornwall.In the tyme of reigne of K. Edward, there was in Cornewall a certeine lustie young Gentleman, which dyd ryde in company with other moe Gentlemen, together with their seruauntes, being about the number of xx. horsemen. Amongest whom this lusty yonker entryng into talke, begā to sweare, most horribly blasphemyng the name of God, with other rybauldry wordes besides. Vnto whom one of the company (who is yet alyue, and wytnes hereof) not able to abyde the hearyng of such blasphemous abomination, in gentle wordes speakyng to hym, sayd he should geue aūswere and accompt for euery idle word.

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MarginaliaGentle exhortation neglected.The Gentleman takyng snuffe therat: why (sayd he) takest thou thought for me? take thought for thy winding sheete. Well (quoth þe other) amend, for death giueth no warnyng: for as soone commeth a lambes skyn to the market as an old sheepes. Gods woundes (sayth he) care not thou for me, ragyng still after this maner worse and worse in wordes, till at length passing on their iorney, they came rydyng ouer a great bridge, standyng ouer a peece of an arme of the Sea. Vpon the which bridge this Gentleman swearer spurred his horse in such sorte, as he sprange cleane ouer with the man on his backe. MarginaliaThe terrible end of a swearer.Who as he was goyng, cryed, saying: horse and man, and all to the deuill. This terrible story happenyng in a Towne in Cornewall, I would haue bene afrayd amongest these storyes here to recite, were it not that he which was thē reprehender of his swearyng, & witnes of his death, is yet aliue, and now a Minister named Heynes. Besides this, also Bishop Ridley then Bishop of London, preached and vttered euen the same fact and example at Paules Crosse. The name of the Gentleman I could by no meanes obteyne of the partie and wytnes aforesayd, for dread of those (as he saith) which yet remaine of his affinitie and kyndered in the sayd countrey.

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Hauing now sufficiently admonished first the Courtiers, then the gentlemen, now thirdly for a briefe admonition to þe Lawyers we will here insert þe straunge end and death of one Henry Smith student of the law.

MarginaliaThe miserable end of Henry Smith a Lawyer of the midle Temple, after he was peruerted frō the Gospell.This Henry Smith hauyng a godly Gentleman to hys father, & an auncient protestant dwellyng in Camden in Glocester shyre, was by him vertuously brought vp in the knowledge of Gods word, and sincere Religion: wherin he shewed him self in the beginning, such an earnest professour, that he was called of þe Papistes, Pratling Smith. After these good beginnings it folow-

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