Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
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2347 [2307]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon Persecutors and contemners of his Gospell.

Marginalia1558.Popishe Coūcell, by the prouident hand of the almightie, dispatched and brought to nought. Ex Sleidano. Lib. 23.

This Councell of Trident beyng then dissolued by the death of this Cardinall, was afterward notwithstandyng recollected agayne about the yere of our Lord. 1562. agaynst the erroneous procedynges of which Councell, other writers there be þt say enough. So much as perteineth onely to story, MarginaliaTwo aduouterous Bishops of Trident Councell, iustly slaine in adultery.I thought hereunto to adde concernyng two filthy aduoulterous Byshops to the sayd Councell belongyng, of whom the one hauntyng to an honest mans wife, was slayne by the iust stroke of God, with a bore speare. The other Byshop, whose haunt was to creepe though a wyndow, in the same wyndow was subtelly taken & hanged in a grinne, layd for him of purpose, and so conueyed, that in the mornyng he was seene openly in þe streete hangyng out of the wyndow, to the wonderment of all that passed by. Ex protestatione Concionatorū Germa. aduersus conuentum Trident. &c.

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MarginaliaD. Eckius the Popes stoute chāpion.Amongest all the religious orders of Papistes, who was a stouter defender of the Popes side, or a more vehement impugner of M. Luther then Iohn Eckius, who, if his cause, wherin he so trauailed had bene godly, had deserued (no doubt) great fauour and condigne retribution at the hands of the Lord. Now for somuch as we cā not better iudge of him then by his end, let vs consider the maner of his departyng hence, and compare the same with the end of M. Luther.

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MarginaliaThe end of Martin Luther compared to þe end of Eckius.In the which M. Luther, beyng such an aduersarie, as he was, to the Pope, and hauyng no lesse then all the world vppon him at once, first this is to be noted, that after all these trauailes, the Lord gaue hym to departe both in great age, and in his owne natiue countrey where he was borne. Secondly, he blessed hym with such a quiet death, without any violent hand of any aduersary, that it was counted rather a sleepe then a death. Thirdly, as the death of his body was mylde, so his spirite and mynde continued no lesse godly vnto the end, continually inuocating and callyng vppon the name of the Lord, and so commending hys spirite to hym with feruent prayer, he made a blessed & an heauēly endyng. Fourthly, ouer and besides these blessings, almighty God did also adde vnto him such an honorable buryall, as to many great Princes vnneth happeneth the like. And this briefly concernyng the end of Martin Luther, as ye may read before more at large, pag. 994.

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Now let vs cōsider & conferre with this, the death of Iohn Eckius, & the maner therof, which we find in the English trāslation of þe history of Ioh. Carion. fol. 250. in these wordes expressed. MarginaliaThe maner of Iohn Eckius death.This yeare (sayth he) dyed at Ingoldstat Doct. Eckius a faithfull seruaunt and champion of the Pope, and a defender of the abominable Papacy. But as his life was full of all vngodlynes, vncleannes, and blasphemy, so was hys end miserable, hard, and pitifull, in so much that his last wordes (as it is noted of many credible persons) were these.: MarginaliaEckius last wordes.In case the foure thousand guildens were ready, þe matter were dispatched, &c. (dreamyng MarginaliaEckius dieth dreaming of his guildens. MarginaliaEx Appēdice Histor. Ioan. Carionis. belyke of some Cardinalshyp that he should haue bought). Some say, that the Pope had graunted hym a certein Deanery, which he should haue redemed from the Court of Rome with there foresayd sūme. Now what a heauenly end this was of M. Eckius, I leaue it to the readers iudgement.

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MarginaliaGods iudgement vppon one Ioh. Vander Warfe Shoulted of Antwarpe, a persecutor.In the Citie of Antwarpe was (as they terme hym there) a Shoulted, that is to say, the next officer to the Margraue, one named Iohn Vander Warfe, a bastard sonne of a stocke or kyndred called Warfe, of good estimation amongest the chiefest in Antwarpe. Who as he was of nature cruell, so was he of iudgement peruerse & corrupt, & a sore persecutor of Christes flocke, with gredines seekyng and sheeding innocent bloud, and had drowned diuers good men and women

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in the water: for the which he was much commended of the bloudy generation. Of some he was called a bloudhound or bloudy dogge. Of other he was called Shildpad: MarginaliaShildpad a kinde of shelfish fashioned like a tode, with a hard and a broad shell vpon hys backe. that is to say, Sheltode: for that he beyng a short grundy and of litle stature, did ryde commonly with a great broad hat, as a churle of the countrey.

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Thys man after he was wery of his office (wherin he had continued aboue xx. yeares) he gaue it ouer: and because he was now growen rich and wealthy, he entended to passe the residue of his lyfe in pleasure and quietnes.

Duryng which tyme, about the second yeare after he had left hys office, he came to Antwarpe to the feast called MarginaliaOur Ladies drūken feast.our Ladyes Oumegang, to make mery: which feast is vsually kept the Sonday folowing the Assumption of our Lady. The same day in the after noone about foure of the clocke, he beyng well loden with wyne, rode homewardes in his wagon, with his wife and a Gentlewoman waytyng on her, and hys foole. As soone as the wagon was come without the gate of the Citie called Croneborgh gate, vpon the wodden Bridge (beyng at that time made for a shift, with railes or barres on both sides, for more safetie of the passengers, halfe a mans height and more) the horses stode stil and would by no meanes go forward, what so euer the guider of the wagon could do.

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Thē he in a drunken rage cryed out to him þt guided the wagon, saying: Ride on, in a thousād deuils name: ryde on. Wherat the poore man aūswered that he could not make the horses to go forward. By and by, while they were yet thus talkyng, sodeinly rose, as it were a mighty hurlewynd, with a terrible noyse (the wether being very fayre and no wynd styrryng before) and tost the wagon ouer the barre into the Towne ditch, the ropes wherat the horses had bene tyed, beyng broken asunder in such sort as if they had bene cut with a sharpe knife, the wagon also beyng cast vpsidedowne, with the foreend therof turned toward the towne agayne, and he drowned in the myre: and when he was taken vp it was found that his necke also was broken. His wife was takē vp alyue, but dyed also within three dayes after. But the Gentlewoman and the foole by Gods mighty prouidence were preserued and had no harme, The foole hearyng the people say that hys master was dead, sayd: and was not I dead, was not I dead too? Thys was done. an. 1553. Witnes hereof not onely the Printer of the same story in Dutch, dwelling then in Antwarpe, whose name was MarginaliaFraunces Fraet the Printer and witness here of, a good man and Martyr.Fraunces Fraet, a good man, & afterward for hatred put to death of the Papistes, but also diuers Dutchmen here now in England, and a great nūber of English Marchantes which then were at Antwarpe and yet are aliue.

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MarginaliaBartholomeus Chaßaneus plagued.Of the sodeine death of Bartholomeus Chassaneus or Cassanus persecutor, read before, pag. 1075.

MarginaliaMinerius plagued of God.Of Minerius the bloudy persecutor or rather tormētor of Christes Saintes, how he dyed with bledyng in his lower partes, ye heard before, pag. 1086.

MarginaliaA Iudge with iij. persecutors, plagued by Gods iudgement.And what should I speake of the Iudge which accompanyed the sayd Minerius in his persecution, who a litle after, as he returned homeward, was drowned, and three moe of the same company kylled one an other vpon a strife that fell amongest them. pag. 1086.

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MarginaliaThe terrible vengeance of God vppon Ioh. de Roma a terrible persecutor. Read before pag. 1075.Ioannes de Roma a cruell Monke, whom rather we may call a helhound then a persecutour, what hellish tormentes he had deuised for the poore Christians of Angrongne, the contentes of the story before doth expresse, pag. 1075. Agayne, with what like tormentes afterward, & that doublefold, the Lord payd hym home agayne, who in his rottyng and stinking death, neither could find any enemy to kill hym, nor any frend to bury him, who neither could abyde his owne stinkyng carion, nor any mā els to come nere him. Hereof read also in the same page and place aboue specified.

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