Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
Critical Apparatus for this Page
None
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
2351 [2311]

The terrible end of persecutours. The death of Hen. 2. French King.

then I here will vtter.

MarginaliaGods mighty power against his enemies.But notwithstandyng all these crackes and threatnyngs of the kyng (to see what the Lord can do in makyng hygh kynges to stoupe) euen the same day when the kyng was in hys most rage agaynst these good men, almighty God, takyng the cause in hand to fight for his Church, so turned the matter, that he made the great enemy of hys, both with hys mouth and with his hand to worke hys owne destruction: with hys mouth in cōmaundyng, with hys hand in gyuyng him the Lance into his hād, which the same day gaue him his deathes wounde, as by the sequele hereof in readyng ye may vnderstand.

[Back to Top]
¶ The stroke of Gods hand vpon Hen. 2. French King.

MarginaliaHenry 2. the French King stricken meruelously by the hand of God.KYng Henry beyng in the Parlament house, which was kept at the Frier Augustines at Paris, because the Pallace was in preparyng agaynst the Mariage of his daughter and hys sister, and hauyng heard the opinion in Religion of Anne du Bourg Counsellour in the law, a man eloquent and learned, he caused the said Anne du Bourg and Loys du Faur Counsellours, to be takē prisoners by the Constable of Fraunce, who apprehended them and deliuered them into the handes of the Coūty of Mongommery, the which caried them to prison. Agaynst whom the kyng beyng wrathful and angry, among other talke, sayd to the sayd Anne du Bourg: These eyes of myne shal see thee burnt, & so on the. 19. of Iune, Commission was geuen to the iudges to make his proces. Duryng this meane while, great feastes and banquets were preparyng in the Court for ioy and gladnes of the Mariage that should be of the kyngs daughter and sister, agaynst the last day of Iune saue one. MarginaliaHenry 2. the French King sore set against the poore protestantsSo when the day and tyme aboue prefixed was come, the kyng employed all the mornyng in examinyng as well the Presidentes, as Counsellours of the sayd Parlement, agaynst the prisoners and other their companions that were charged with the same doctrine: which beyng done, they went to dyner. The kyng after he had dyned, for that he was one of the defendātes at the Tourney, which was solemnely made in S. Antonyes Streete neare to the prison where the foresayd prisoners were committed, he entred into the lystes, and there in iustyng, as the maner is, had broken many staues right valiantly as could be, runnyng as wel agaynst County of Montgommery as other moe. Whereupon he was hyghly commended of the lookers on. MarginaliaHenry 2. the French King in his triūph iusteth against Montgōmery.And because he had done so valiantly, and was thought now to haue done enough, he was desired to cease with prayse. But he beyng the more inflamed with hearing of his prayse, would needes runne an other course with Montgommery: who then refusing to runne agaynst the kyng, and kneelyng vpon hys knees for pardon not to runne, the kyng beyng egerly set, commaunded hym vppon hys allegeance to runne, and (as some affirme) dyd also hym selfe put the staffe in his hand, vnto whose handes he had committed the foresayd prisoners a litle before. MarginaliaMontgōmery against his will commaunded to iuste against the King.Montgommery thus beyng enforced whether he would or no, to runne agaynst the kyng, addressed hym selfe after the best wise to obey the kynges commaundement. Wherupon he and the kyng met together so stoutly that in breakyng their speares, the kyng was stricken with the counterblow so right in one of his eyes, by reason þt þe visour of hys helmet sodenly fell downe at the same instant, that the shyuers entred into his head: MarginaliaHenry 2. the French King stricken and killed in his owne iusting.so that the braynes was perished, and thereupon so festered that no remedy could be found, although Phisicians and Surgians were sent for from all places in the Realme, as also frō Brabant by kyng Phillip, but nothyng auayled, so that þe xj. day after, that is the x. of Iuly. 1559. he ended hys lyfe in great dolour, hauyng raigned. 12. yeares, three monethes and 10. dayes.

[Back to Top]

Some report that among other wordes he sayd that he feared he was stricken for casting þe poore Christians wrōgfully in prison: but þe Cardinal of Loraine stādyng

by (as he was alwayes at hand) MarginaliaThe deuelish persuasion of Card. Lorayne at the death of the French King.sayd vnto hym that it was the enemy that tempted hym, and that he should be stedfast in the fayth. By this meanes the hall which was prepared for a place of ioy and gladnes, dyd now serue for a chappell to keepe the corps, beyng dressed with blacke mournyng cloth, and night and day there was nothyng heard but mournyng and lamentyng for the space of xl. dayes.

[Back to Top]

About two yeares after this, which was the yeare of our Lord. 1561. there was certeine Gentlemen put to death at Amboise, for takyng armes agaynst the house of Guise. MarginaliaCertaine gentlemen executed at Amboyse for stāding against the house of Guyse.Touchyng which Gentlemen this is to bee noted that as one of them should be brought to the place of execution, where þe other lay dead before hym, he thrust his handes into the bloud of 2. of his cōpanions which were there beheaded, and then lifting them vp to heauen, cryed with a loude voyce: Lord behold the bloud of thy children: thou wilt in tyme and place reuenge it.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Lordes punishment vpon the Chauncelour Oliuier for his sentence geuen against certaine Gentlemen Protestantes.Not long after the same the Chauncellour Oliuier, who was condemner of them, at the instigation & pursuite of the Cardinall of Lorraine, through great remorse of conscience fell sicke, and in a frenesie castyng out sighes vncessantly, and afflictyng him selfe after a fearefull and straunge fashion for his vnrighteous sentence and more then barbarous crueltie, shriked vpon a sodden with an horrible cry & sayd: O Cardinal, thou wilt make vs al to be damned, and within a very few dayes after he dyed.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe death of Frances 2. French King, after he began to withstand the course of the Gospell.Fraunces the secōd of that name, kyng of Fraunce, at the persuasion of the Cardinall of Lorraine and of certeine others, caused an assembly of the Estates of the Realme in the towne of Orleans, among other things to mainteyne the Papall sea, to the ouerthrow of those which would lyue after the sinceritie of the Gospell: MarginaliaHow the Lord worketh for his Gospell.but beyng fallen sicke shortly after in the foresayde place of a feauer, through an impostume in his left eare, he dyed the 4. of December. 1561. hauyng raigned but one yeare and about 5. monethes.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe wordes of King Frances at his death.It was sayd of this kyng Fraunces (as the authour aboue mencioned reporteth) that when he was drawyng towardes his end the Cardinall of Lorraine made him to say and pronounce these wordes which folow: Lord forgeue me my trespasses, and impute not vnto me the faultes which my ministers haue done vnder my name and authoritie.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe death of Charles the Emperour.Vnto these afore recited histories of kyng Henry & king Fraunces his sonne, might also be added, þe death of the Emperour Charles the fift. Who in like maner beyng an enemy, and a great terrour to the Gospell, was cut of likewise for doyng any more hurt to the Church, much about the same tyme, an. 1558. which was but three monethes before the death of Queene Mary, and x. monethes before the death of the said Henry þe second. Touching the death of which Charles, and Henry, and Fraunces, this Epitaph following was writiten in Latin verses, and printed in the French story booke, aboue alledged.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAn Epitaphe vpon Charles Emperour, Henry 2. the French King, and Frances his sonne.Consiliis Christum oppugnans & fraudibus, ingens
Regum ille terror Carolus,
Ipsis ridiculus pueris, furiosus & excors,
Totus repente corruit.
Tuq̀ Henrice, malis dum consultoribus vtens,
Sitis piorum sanguinem,
Ipse tuo vecors inopina cæde peremptus,
Terram imbuisti sanguine.
Henrici deinceps sectans vestigia patris
Franciscus infœlix puer,
Clamantem Christum surda dum negligit aure,
Aure putrefacta corruit.
Versuti, fatui, surdi, hæc spectacula Reges,
Vos sapere vel mori iubent.

[Back to Top]

Not long after Anne du Bourges death, the President Minard, who was a sore persecutor, and the con-

demner
GGGGG.j.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield