Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. William Living68. The Miraculously Preserved69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. John Davis80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth99. The Unprosperous Queen Mary100. Punishments of Persecutors101. Foreign Examples102. A Letter to Henry II of France103. The Death of Henry II and others104. Admonition to the Reader
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2352 [2312]

The terrible end of persecutors. An admonition to all persecutors.

dēner of the sayd Anne du Bourg, MarginaliaThe sodayne death of President Minard.as he returned from the Palace or Counsell chamber to his owne house, beyng vpon his mule, euen hard by his house was slayne with a dagge, but who was the doer therof or for what cause he was slayne, for all the inquisition and diligent search that could be made, it was neuer knowen.

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MarginaliaThe punishment of God vpon þe King of Nauarre, after he had reuolted from the Gospell to Popery.Amongest many other examples worthy to be noted, let vs also consider the end of the king of Nauarre, brother to the worthy Prince of Condy, who after he had susteined a certeine tyme, the cause of the Gospell, at length beyng allured by the flatteryng wordes of the Duke of Guise and the Cardinall of Lorraine his brother, and vpon hope to haue his landes restored agayn which the kyng of Spayne reteined from hym, was contented to alter his Religion and to ioyne side with the Papistes, and so beyng in Campe with the Duke of Guise at the siege of Roane, was there shot in with a pellet. After which wound receaued, beyng brought to a towne three myles from the campe called Preaux, he did vehemently repent and lament his backslydyng frō the Gospell, promising to God most earnestly, that if he might escape that hurt, he would bryng to passe that þe Gospell should be preached freely through all Fraūce: Notwithstandyng within v. or vj. dayes after he dyed.

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MarginaliaThe Duke of Guyse slayne before Orleance The Constable before Paris. The Marshal of S. Andrew before Dreux.Neither did the Duke of Guise him selfe, the great archenemy of God and his Gospell, cōtinue in lyfe long after that, but both he with the whole Triumuirat of Fraunce, that is, three the greatest Captaines of Popery, were cut of for doyng any more hurt, to wit þe Duke of Guise before Orleance, the Cōstable before Paris, the Marshall of S. Andrew before Dreux.

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¶ Admonition to the Reader.

IT hath bene a long persuasion gendered in the heades of many men these many yeares, that to ground a mans fayth vpon Gods word alone, and not vppon the sea and Church of Rome, folowyng all the ordinaunces and constitutions of the same, was damnable heresie, and to persecute such men to death, was hygh seruice done to God. Wherupon hath rysen so great persecutions, slaughters, and murthers, with such effusion of Christen bloud through all partes of Christendome, by the space of these 70. yeares, as hath not before bene seene. And of these men Christ him self full wel doth warne vs long before, truly prophesying of such tymes to come when they that sley his Ministers and seruauntes, should thinke them selues to do good seruice vnto God. MarginaliaIohn. 16.Iohn. 16. Now, what wicked seruice and how detestable before God this is, which they falsely persuade them selues to be godly, what more euident demonstrations can we require, then these so many, so manifest, and so terrible examples of Gods wrath pouryng downe from heauen vpon these persecutours, whereof part wee haue already set forth: for to comprehend all (which in number are infinite) it is vnpossible.

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Wherfore, although there be many which will neither heare, see, nor vnderstand what is for their proft: yet let all moderate and well disposed natures take warnyng in tyme. Marginaliaiij. Argumēts against þe Papistes.Gods word. Bloud of Martirs. Gods punishment.And if the plaine word of God will not suffice them, nor the bloud of so many Martyrs wil moue them to embrace the truth and forsake errour, yet let the desperate deathes and horrible punishmentes of their owne Papistes persuade them how perillous is the end of this damnable doctrine of Papistry. MarginaliaThe plagues of God, set against pretensed antiquitie.For if these Papistes whiche make so much of their paynted antiquitie, do thinke their procedings to be so catholicke, and seruice so acceptable to God, let them ioyne this withall, and tell vs, how commeth then their procedinges to be so accursed of God, and theyr end so miserably plagued, as by these examples aboue specified is here notoriously to be seene? Agayne,

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if the doctrine of them be such heresie whom they haue hetherto persecuted for heretickes vnto death, how then is almighty God become a mainteyner of heretickes, who hath reuenged their bloud so greuously vpon their enemyes and persecuters?

MarginaliaHenry. 2. þe French King, and King Frāces his sonne, stricken, the one in þe eyes, þe other with an imposteme in the eare.The puttyng out of the French kynges eyes, which promised before with his eyes to see one of Gods true seruauntes burned, who seeth not with his eyes to be the stroke of Gods hand vpon him? Then his sonne Fraunces after him, not regardyng his fathers stripe, would needes yet procede in burnyng the same man: and did not the same God whiche put out his fathers eyes, giue him such a blow on þe eare, þt it cost him hys life? MarginaliaSteuen Gardiner.if the platforme of Steuen Gardiner had bene a thyng so necessary for the Church, and so gratfull vnto God, why thē did it not prosper with hym, nor he with it: but both he and his platforme lay in the dust, and none left behynd hym to buyld vpon it? After the tyme of Steuen Gardiner, and at the Councell of Trent, what cōspiracies and policies were deuised? what practises and traynes were layd through the secrete confederacie of Princes and Prelates, for the vtter subuersion of the Gospell & all Gospellers, which if God had seene to haue bene for his glory, why then came they to no effect? yea how or by whom were they disclosed and foreprised, but by the Lord him selfe, which would not haue them come forward?

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MarginaliaQueene Mary.The vehement zeale of Queene Mary, which was lyke to haue set vp the Pope here agayne in England for euer, if it had so much pleased the Lord God as it pleased her selfe: or if it had bene so Godly as it was bloudy, no doubt but Gods blessing would haue gone withall. But when was the Realme of England more barren of all Gods blessynges? what Prince euer reigned here more shorter tyme, or lesse to his owne hartes ease them did Queene Mary?

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MarginaliaConstable of France.The Constable of Fraunce when he conuēted with God, that if he had victory at S. Quintyns, he would set vpon Geneua, thought (no doubt) that he had made a great good bargaine with God: Much like to Iulian the Emperour, who goyng agaynst the Persiās, made his vowe that if he sped well, he would offer the bloud of Christians. But what did God? came not both theyr vowes to like effect?

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The examples of such as reuolted from þe Gospell to Papistry, be not many: but as few as they were, scarse can any be found whiche began to turne to the Pope, but the Lord began to turne from thē, & to leaue them to theyr ghostly enemy: MarginaliaFranciscus de Spera. MarginaliaKing of Nauarre. Henry Smyth. D. Shaxton. MarginaliaThe end of Gardiner. Iohn de Roma. Twyford. Baylyfe of Crowland. Suffragan of Douer. D. Dunning D. Geffray. Berry. Poncher Archb. Crescentius Card. Rokwod. Latomus. Guarlacus. Eccius. Thornton. Pauyer. Longe. Bomelius, al professors of Popery.As wee haue heard of Franciscus Spiera a lawyer in Italy, of the kyng of Nauarre in Fraunce, of Hēry Smith, and Doct. Shaxton in England, with other in other countreys mo, of whō some dyed in great sorrow of conscience, some in miserable doubt of their saluation, some stricken by Gods hand, some driuen to hang or drowne them selues.

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The stinkyng death of Steuen Gardiner, of Iohn de Roma, of Tywford, of the Balyfe of Crowland: The suddeine death of the Suffragane of Douer, of Doct. Dunnyng, of Doct. Geffray, of Berry the promoter: The miserable and wretched ende of Poncher Archbyshop of Towers, of Cardinall Crescentius, Castellanus: The desperate decease of Rockwoode, of Latomus, of Guarlacus: The earthly endyng of Henry Beauford Cardinall of Winchester, of Eccius, of Thornton called Dicke of Douer: The wilful and self murder, of Pauyer, of Richard Longe, of Bomelius, besides infinite other: The dreadfull takyng away and murren of so many persecutyng Byshops, so many bloudy Promoters, and malicious aduersaries, in such a short tyme together with Queene Mary, & that without any mans hand, but onely by the secret workyng of Gods iust iudgement: what els be all these (I say) but playn visible Arguments, testimonies, and demonstrations euen from heauen agaynst the Pope, his murderyng Religion, and his bloudy doctrine? For who can

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deny
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