Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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374 [363]

K. Henry 3. Peace betwen the king and the nobles. Warre betwen the pope and Romās.

MarginaliaRichard Earle Marshall fraudulētly circumuented and slayne in Ireland.risco, was circūuented by the Irishmen in warre, and there taken and wounded, was by them through the meanes of his Surgean slayne.

MarginaliaCatini slayne about Almain, iudged of the Papistes for heretickes.Great slaughter the same tyme was of them which were called Catini, about þe partes of Almaine. These Catini were estemed of Pope Gregorie and the Papistes to be heretickes. But what their opinions were I finde it not expressed. In Pariens.

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MarginaliaAlbigēses slayne in Spayne by the Popes setting on.In like sorte the Albingenses afore mentioned, recounted also of the Popes flocke to be heretickes, with their Byshops, and a great number and company of them, were slayne by the cōmaundement of Pope Gregorie at the same tyme in a certaine plaine in Spayne. Ex Mat. Pariens. fol. 87.

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How the Archbishop of Canterbury with other two Bishops, were sent into Walles for intreatie of peace, ye heard before. At whose returne agayne after þe tyme of Easter, the kyng goyng toward Glocester to meete them by the way, as he was in his iourney at Woodstocke, came messēgers from Ireland, declaryng to the kyng the death of Richard Earle Marschall, and the order therof, through the forged letters of Winchester and other, MarginaliaThe kyng lamenteth the death of Richard Earle Marshall. whereat the kyng made great lamentation and mournyng, to the great admiratiō of all them that were by, saying and complainyng, that he left not hys like in all the Realme agayne.

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After this the kyng procedyng in his iorney came to Gloucester. Where the Archbishop with the other Bishops comming to the kyng, declared to him the forme and condition of peace which they had concluded with Leoline, which was this: If the kyng would be reconciled before with the other nobles with whom he was confederate, such as the kyng had banished out of hys Realme: to the end that the cōcorde might be the more firme betwene them. Thus (said they) was Leoline cōtented, although with much a do and great difficultie, to receaue the league of peace, saying and protestyng thus vnto them, MarginaliaThe saying of Leoline kyng of Wales.
The almose of K. Henry more feared thē his puisaunce.
that he feared more the kyngs almose, then all the puisaunce both of him and of all his Clergie within England.

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MarginaliaPeace concluded betwene the kyng and the nobles.This done the kyng there remainyng with the Byshops, directeth his letters to all the exiles and banished Lordes and to all his nobles, that they should repayre to him about the begynnyng of Iune, at Gloucester, promising to them his full fauour and reconcilement to them and to their heyres, and that they should suspect no fraud therin, they should haue their safe conduct by the Archbishop and Byshops.

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Wherupon through the mediation of the sayd Archbishop and the Bishops, first commeth to the kyng Hubert Earle of Kent, offering him selfe to the kynges good will and fauour. MarginaliaHubert Earle of Kent restored agayne to þe kings fauour.Whom the kyng with cherefull countenaunce receaued and embraced, restoryng hym not onely to his fauour, but also to his houshold and counsaile, with his liuinges and possessiōs from which he had bene diseised before. MarginaliaHubert geueth thankes to God.Then Hubert liftyng vp his eyes to heauen, gaue prayse and glory to God, by whose gratious prouidence he so meruelously beyng preserued frō so great distresses and tribulations, was agayne so happely reconciled to the kyng, and his faithfull frendes. After him in like sort came in Gilbert Basset a noble man, Richard Suard: also Gilbert the brother of Richard Marschall that was slayne. Which Gilbert recouered agayne his whole inheritaunce as well in England as in Ireland, doyng his homage to the kyng and his seruice due for the same. To whō also was graunted the office of the highe Marschall Court, belongyng before to his brother Richard.

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MarginaliaFalsehode and murder commeth out.In the same counsaile or communication continuyng then at Gloucester, the sayd Edmund Archbyshop of Canterbury, bryngyng the forged letters, wherin was betrayed the life of Richard Earle Marschall, sealed with the kynges seale, and sent to the great men of Ireland, read the same openly in the presence of the kyng and all the nobles. At the hearyng wherof, the Marginaliakynges many tymes abused by wicked coūsaile.kyng greatly sorowyng and weepyng, confessed there in truth that beyng forced by the Bishop of Winchester and Peter de Riuallis, commaunded his seale to be set to certain letters presented vnto him, but the tenour therof he sayd and sware hee neuer heard. Wherunto the Archb. aunsweryng agayn, desired þe kyng to search well his conscience, and said, that all they which were procurers or of knowledge of those letters, were giltie of the death of the Earle Marschall, no lesse then if they had murdered him with theyr owne handes.

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MarginaliaThe Byshop of Winchester called to hys aunswere.Then the kyng callyng a counsaile, sent his letters for the Bishop of Winchester, for Peter Riuall, Stephen Segraue, and Robert Passelew to appeare and yelde account for his treasures to them committed and for his seale by them abused. But the Bishop and Riuall kepyng them selues in the sanctuarie of the Mynster Church of Wynchester, neither durst nor would appeare. Stephen Segraue who succeded after Hubert the Iustice, & was of the Clergie before, after became a layman, and now hidyng him selfe in S. Maryes Church in the Abbay of Leycester, was turned to a Clerke agayne. Robert Passelew couertly hidde hym selfe in a certaine celler of the new temple, so secretly that none could tel where he was, but thought he was gone to Rome. At lēgth through the foresayd Edmund Archbishop of Canterbury, meanes was made, that a dilatorie day was graunted by the kyng, for them to aunswere. MarginaliaPeter Riual. Stephen Segraue, Robert Passelew called to their aūswere.At which day first appeared Peter de Riuallis, then Stephen Segraue, After him Robert Passelew, ech of them seuerally one after an other shewed them selues, but not able to aunswere for them selues, lyke traytours were reproued, and like villanes were sent away. Ex Mat. Pariens. fol. 91.

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¶ Variance betwene Pope Gregory 9. and the Romanes. 
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Gregory IX

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

MarginaliaVariance betwene the pope and Citisens of Rome.WHile peace thus betwene the kyng and the nobles was reconciled in England, dissension & variance the same tyme and yeare began in Rome, betwene the Pope and the Citizens of Rome. MarginaliaThe causes of variance betwene the pope and Citie of Rome.The cause was, for that the Citizens claimed by old custome and law, MarginaliaThe allegation of the Romās.that the Byshop of Rome might not excommunicate any Citizen of the Citie, nor suspend the sayd Citie with any interdiction for any maner excesse.

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MarginaliaThe Popes aunswere.To this the Pope aunswered agayn, Quòd minor Deo est, sed quolibet homine maior (to vse the very wordes of myne author) Ergo, Maior quolibet ciue, næ etiam rege, vel Imperatore. &c. MarginaliaThe pope lesse then God: but greater then man.that is, that he is lesse then God, but greater then any man. Ergo, greater then any Citezen, yea also greater then Kyng, or Emperour. And for somuch as hee is their spirituall father, he both ought and lawfully may chastice his children when they offend, as beyng subiected to him in the faith of Christ, and reduce them into the way agayne, when they stray out of course.

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MarginaliaThe 2. allegation of the Romans.Moreouer, the Citizens alledge agayn for them selues, that the Potestates of the Citie and Senatours do receaue of the Church of Rome MarginaliaThe Pope bound to pay to Rome yearely tribute.yearely tribute, which the Bishops of Rome were bound to pay vnto them, both by new and also auncient law. Of the which yearely tribute, theyhaue bene euer in possession before this present tyme of this Pope Gregory 9.

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MarginaliaThe Pope replyeth.Hereunto the Pope aunswered and sayd, that although the Church of Rome in tyme of persecution, for their defence and cause of peace was wont to respect the head rulers of the Citie with gentle rewardes, yet that ought not now to be take for a custome: For that custome onely ought to stand, which consisteth not vpon examples, but vpon right and reason.

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MarginaliaThe 3. cause and allegation of the Romās.Farther and besides, the Citizens sayd, that they at the commaundement of the Senatour would appropriate their coūtrey with new and larger limites, and infranches the same beyng enlarged with new fines and borders.

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