Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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394 [373]

K. Henry. 3. Friderick. 2. Pope Jnnocentius. 3.of the church.
¶ The tragicall history of Fridericke. 2. Emperour. 
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Frederick II

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

For so much as the story of Fridericke the emperour is incident in the same tyme of this K. Henry 3. and containeth matter much worthy of memorie, considering the vtilitie therof: after the tractatiō of our english stories, I could not but also insert the whole narration of thys tragical history of the said Fridericke, which I haue caused faithfully and amplye to be collected and translated out of the latine booke of Nic. Cisnerus. containyng as followeth.

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MarginaliaWhat house Friderick came of.FRiderike the second, came out of the auncient house of þe Beblines or Gibellines: which Gibellines came of þe most famous stock of the french kyngs & emperors.

MarginaliaWhat father and mother.He had Friderike Barbarossa to his graundfather, whose sonne Henricus the 6. emperour after hym was: and of Constantia, the daughter (or as some wryte the neece) of Roger the first, kyng of Sicile: he begatte thys Friderike the second.

MarginaliaThe tyme & maner of hys byrth.This Constantia was 50. yeares of age before she was conceiued wyth him: whom the Emperour Henry 6. to auoyde all doubte and surmise that of her conception and chylding might be thought, and to the peril of the empire ensue: caused his regall tente to be pitched abrode in a place where euery mā might resort. And whē the tyme of his queenes trauell approched, Constantia (in the presence of diuers ladies, matrones, and other gētle women of the empyre, a great number) was brought a bedde and deliuered of this Friderike: the vij. day before the Calendes of Ianuary, in the yere of christes incarnation, 1193. who by inheritaunce was kyng of Naples, Apulia, Calabria, and Sicilia.

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Henricus his father obtayned shortly after he was borne, of the princes electors: that by their othe to him geuen, they would chuse hys sonne Friderike for their emperour after his decease, and so dyd, & immediatly called hym Cesar, beyng yet but in hys cradle.

This Henry when he dyed (which was shortly after the birth of Friderike) committed the protection of hym to Constantia his wyfe, to Philip his brother chiefe gouernour of Hetruria, and to the bishop of Rome, then Innocentius the third.

MarginaliaWhat patrones he had.Constantia, not long after the death of Henrye her husband being sickly and growing into age, and therby not so well able to gouerne the troblous and vnquiete state of the Empire: resigned, and wylled by her testamente, the safetye bothe of her sonne Friderike and also of his dominions, to the protection & gouernment of Innocēt the 3. thinkyng therby safely to haue prouided, &c.

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MarginaliaThe cōspiracies of pope Innocent against Friderike duryng hys minoritie.This pope Innocent, assone as he had þe protectiō of þe yong emperour and his Segniories: became in stead of a patrone and protectour, to hym and to hys dominions both an enemy and conspiratour. The examples are many: One is, he perswaded Sibil the late wyfe of Tancredus (whom Henry put from the kyngdome of Sicile) to recouer þe same agayn, & that she shuld therunto require Phillip the Frenche kings ayde: Wherupon, one Waltherus beyng of the noble house of the earles of Brenno which in þe prouince of Barrencecis had great lyuing, & maryeng with Ateria the eldest daughter of Trancredus once king of Sicile as is sayd: now by the instigation, counsel, and ayde of the French king with the pope (wel hopyng to recouer the kingdom) entred and inuaded wt greate power Campania, and Apulia. At which time also, the same worthy protectour Innocentius the thyrd, sent his legates wyth letters of excōmunication against all those that would not admit and take the sayd Waltherus for their kyng. MarginaliaThe second conspiracie.

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An other was, that where the princes Electours and other nobles as before is sayd had promised by their oth to Hēricus, þt they would make Friderick his sōne Emperour after his dissease (whom þe pope saw to put their indeuour therunto & to bryng to passe) absolued thē all frō the othe which they had takē & geuen for the election of Friderick the emperour, as one not cōtent he should obtayne the same: And further, he raysed slaunders and MarginaliaThe thyrd conspiracie.defamatiōs against Philip, whom þe electours had chosen to gouerne the empire during the minority of Friderike hys nephew. He wrote his epistle (which is yet extante) to the duke Barthold of Zaringia to be emperor: Who, for that he gaue place to Philip, he went aboute to procure, that Otho the son of Henry Leo shoulde be made Emperour, and that the princes and lordes electours of Germany, would crowne him forth with after þe maner of Aquisgraue. MarginaliaThe fourth conspiracie.He depriued al such bishops as he knew to fauour Phillip as emperour, in the defēce of his nephewes ryght. But Phillip, whose cause was better, his skyll in martiall affayres greater, and in power and strength mightier: after diuers and great conflictes to the maruelous disturbāce and vastation of the whole empyre, by gods helpe he put to the worse. Al which calamities and mischiefes Conradus Lichtenanus at that tyme liuing, in his Annales most pitifully complayneth of: and accuseth the bishop of Rome and his adherentes to be the chiefe autors & deuisours of this great & lamentable mischief: as such, þt for to make thēselues rich by þe spoyle therof, sought by all meanes and desyred þe same.

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MarginaliaThe fyfth conspiracie.Not long after a peace was concluded betwene Philip and Otho, and Philip reconsiled agayne to the pope: MarginaliaPhilip slaine.He was within a while after betwene Otho and hym, murdred in his chamber & slayne. And thē was Otho agayn brought to the imperiall seate, and new elected for emperour, wyth the counsel and consent of thys Innocent the thyrd: MarginaliaVariance betwene Otho and the pope.and so cōtinued till that a great variance & discord chaunced to rise betwene the sayd Otho & the pope. Wherupon, Innocentius sought by all meanes, how against hym in likewise, he might worke mischief and bryng him to his eande. The occasiō of this sodain chaunge & alteracion my author maketh no mention of, but that Otho (now being of great power) inuaded and destroyed these dominions of Friderike, as Flamminia, Picenum, Vmbria, Hetruria, but chiefly Campania, and Apulia, for that those properly pertained to the inheritaunce of Friderike.

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Thus you see, how first by the counsel and consent of Pope Innocentius & by his instigation, besyde his secret conspiracies: this good Friderike and his dominions were hurte and indamaged. Then agayne, through hys default what damage he sustayned by Otho, who by hym and hys meanes was made so strōg as he was: notwythstandyng, the great truste he was put in for the protection both of Friderick and his dominions.

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MarginaliaWhat learning & knowledge he was of.At thys tyme, Friderike was come to the age of xx. yeres: who in hys youth by þe prouision of Constantia his mother, was so wel instructed in letters, & in other artes & vertues so imbued: that at these yeres there appeared and dyd shyne in hym, excellent giftes both of wisdome and knowledge.

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MarginaliaWhat vertues indued he was with.He was excellentlye well seene in thee latine and greeke tongue: although at that tyme learnyng began to decay and barbarousnes to increase. He had also the Germaine tongue, the Italian tounge, and the Sarasen toung. He daily exercised & put in practise those vertues which nature had planted in hym, as piety, wysedome, iustice, and fortitude: in so much, that wel he myght be compared and accompted, amongest the worthiest and most renowmed Emperours his predecessours.

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MarginaliaFrid. suspected for hys graundfathers sake.Fazellus (the historisian of Sicilia in this time) writeth, that Fridericus was again after this had in great honour and estimation with Innocentius: but yet notwithstandyng, he had no sure confidence in him for þt he had the suspected name of Friderike his graundfather often in remembrance, and for that occasion was much desirous to haue hym far from Italy.

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MarginaliaThe coronatiō of Fridericke.When Friderike had gathered hys power, he purposed to set vpō Otho his enemy: of which thyng Otho hearyng (as he was painefull in trauell) came out of Italy wyth hys army into Germany, thinkyng to haue

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