Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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439 [418]

K. Henry. 3. Ciuile dissension betwene the king and the lordes. Actes and Mon. of the church.

MarginaliaPrince Edward also put to the worse, and fain to take the towne.some getting of booties, neither coulde scarcelye one of them known and decerne an other whither he were hys friend or enemy. But when within a whyle the barons had assembled some company, MarginaliaThe Castell of Lewes besiegedthey gaue an assault vpō the castell, thinking to haue rescued Iohn Gifferd and others whom the kinges soldiours had taken prisoners & put therin. But the soldiours within defended manfully the same, and in throwing out balles of wild fyre, as for the defence therof they had, they also fyered part of the towne. Then the Barons retired and left the castel, and purposed to haue set vpon the Abbey wher the king and Prince Edwarde his sonne was, which also was set on fire by the assaulte geuen to the Castell. But yet it was shortly recouered & quenched. Then Edward the kings sonne perceauing the bold enterprise of the Barons, prepared with couragious knightes and soldiours as were yet remayning & within the Abbey, to haue issued out, and to haue geuen a new charge vpon them. But that perceauing the Barons, sent vnto the king messengers to intreat a truce for that day, and on þe morow to talke and cōclude of a further peace betwene them. This battel was fought vpon the xix. day of May, being the yere of our Lord. 1264.

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MarginaliaA peace intreated betwene the kyng and Barones.The next day, which was Thursday, there wer sent on either side two preaching friers betwene the King & the Barons, with certain articles and demaundes of peace: so that with certayn others, these condicions wer agreed on: MarginaliaThe two princes geuen in hostage.that on the morow beyng Friday, the prince should giue him selfe in hostage for the Kyng hys father and other of his partes. And Henrye the kinges sonne of Almaine also should geue him selfe the like for his father. That those thinges which should be concluded vpon for the benefite and commoditie of the realme, and peaceable quietnes thereof might be performed: and that all such prisoners as were taken on either syde, shoulde be freely raunsommed and sent home.

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The next day which was Saterday, the king discharged all his soldiours, and other that were with hym in the Abbey, licensing them to depart whither them listed. And furthermore, by the aduise of his sonne and the barons: he gaue cōmaundement to those which he had appointed to the keeping of Tunbridge, that they shoulde make no attempt to the preiudice or hurt of the barons, but in hope of the peace which was now at the poynt to be concluded, they should also depart eueryman to their houses and habitacions. MarginaliaThe kinges souldiors in Tunbridge after they had spoyled the Lōdiners at Crowdown, kept themselues in garrison at Bristow.But they geuing no credit therunto, went with their furniture to Bristow, where they kept them selues in garrison, vntill the escaping of Edward the kinges sonne out of prison. But fyrst before that, when they heard at Tunbridge that the king was vanquished in battayle, and that the Londoners in the forward were put to flight by prince Edward (by a messenger that escaped from the same) & that also the same Londoners were at Crowdowne: they set vpon them in the euning tyde, and taking from them much spoyle, slew also many of them.

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But when Roger Mortimers part began to decrease and Simon the earles part on the other side to increase: MarginaliaEarle Simon after this victory beareth himselfe so stout, that he imprisoneth the hostages of the kinge.he bare himselfe more stouter, for that both the king and all that was his, did depend vpon the good wyll and fauour of the Earle: and led with him the kinges sonne to such holdes & castels as he thought to be most strongest. As though all were in hys handes to do as hym lyked, & kept the hostages more straytly then he was woont to do. In so much that when it was blowen abroade that the kinges sonne was kept as a prisoner, diuers counselled him that were his frendes, that he shoulde desire to disporte himselfe at the barriers, that the people might haue a sight of him: but he being narowly garded as he knew, and fearing some tumult to aryse, thought good to refuse their counsel, and so did.

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In this troublesome yeare, which was. 1264. as theLondiners with the nobles were thus occupyed in war and dissension: the malignant Iewes thynkyng to take vantage of the tyme, with priuey treason conspired agaynst the whole citie & state of the nobles. Who beyng taken with the maner, were almost all slayne that dwelt in the citie of London.

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MarginaliaThe death of pope Vrbane.
Pope Clement. 4.
Pope Clement first a maried mā and had wyfe and children.
In this yeare after the death of pope Vrbane, succeded the sayd yeare of our Lord. an. 1264. pope Clement the fourth. Whiche Clement, as affirmeth Nich. Triuet, was first a maried man, and had wife and children, and was the sollicitor and counsaylour to the French kyng. Then after the death of his wife was byshop intituled Podiensis. After that archbyshop of Narbone. And at last made Cardinall. Who beyng sent of Pope Vrbane in legacie, for reformation of peace, in his absence was elected pope by the Cardinals. MarginaliaThomas Aquine Bonauenture readers at Paris.About the tyme florished Thomas of Aquine, reader at Paris amōg the Dominicke friers, and Bonauenture, among the Francis frieres. Ex Nich Triuet.

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Marginalia1265.As this passed on, the sonnes of Simon the Earle, to witt Henry, Simon, Guido, and Henry, beyng pufft vp, and with the pride of this succes eleuated, dyd that whiche nothyng contented the earle of Glocester. 

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Battle of Evesham

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

In so much, that he chalenged Henry the eldest sonne of the earle Simon Mountfort, at the barriers, to be tryed at Northampton. But that chalenge was taken vp, least some farther inconueniēce might haue risen therof. MarginaliaDissention betwene Earle Simon and the Earle of Glocester.But þe earle of Glocester beyng moued therwith in his mind, sent vnto his father the earle, that he should deliuer him such prisonners beyng noble men, as he tooke at the battaile of Lewes. Amongst whom, the Kyng of Almayne was named first. But he by countermaund aunswered him and said: that it might content and satisfie him, for that he had saued and preserued to hym his landes, that day the battaile was faught at Lewes. And that farther more, he would not send him suche prisoners as he demaunded: But that he him selfe kept more nobler, then they, in the castell of Douer: among whom was Ihon Basset, whiche vndermined and brast down þe walles of Northamptō, at that conflict as is said before & specified.

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The earle of Glocester herewith beyng displeased, as soone as he hard this aunswere: sent incontinently to the Lord Roger Mortimer, whiche alwayes tooke the kings part, desiryng that they two might talke together, touchyng the benefite and commoditie of the Kyng. Who, doubtyng some deceit, desired sureties and pledges for his safe returne, and he would come & talke with him, & so had. MarginaliaThe earle of Glocester and Roger Mortimer cōspired against earle Symon.When they met, and had a while talked familiarly: the earle of Glocester shewed him all that he was purposed to do: and that farther he lamēted, he had so much and greatly offended the Kyng: And that he would with all his power and abilitie, make amendes for that offēce in the restitution of the King agayne to his kyngly dignitie, as much as he possible might. Therfore, they sent secretly to Robert, the brother of the earle of Glocester, which was neare about the earle Simon, and made him to consent with them therein. And to worke this thyng more circumspectly, when oportunitie serued therunto: Roger Mortimer sent vnto the kynges sonne, a horse excellyng all other in footemanship, vnto whom he myght be sure to trust, when he saw conuenient tyme therunto. After whiche things thus contriued, prince Edward desired leaue of the earle, to proue his courser against such time, he should ride at the Tilte, as they might whē they listed. MarginaliaPrince Edward escapeth from out of the custody of Erle Simon by arraine.Assone as he had gotten leaue, and that with galloping & ranging the field he had weried diuers of theyr horses: at the last, geting vp vpon the horse whiche for þe purpose was sent, & spied a seruant on horseback cōming towarde him wt two swordes. He turned about vnto his keper, whose name was Robert de Rose, and to other his play felowes that were with hym, saying: My louyng Lordes, Thus long haue I kept you company, and haue

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