Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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505 [484]

Actes. and Mon. of the church. K. Edward. 3. Calys wonne. The French K. taken prisoner

MarginaliaThe towne of Calice wonne.in the town of Calys, seyng the kyng to be retired (vpon whose helpe they trusted, being also in great penury and famine for lacke of victuals, and otherwise in much misery vehemently distressed) surrendered the towne to the kynges handes: who like a mercifull prince onely deteynyng certeine of the chiefe, the rest with the whole commons he let go with bag & bagges, diminishing no part of their goods, shewīg therin more princely fauor to thē, thē they did of late in quene Maries days vnto our mē, in recouering the sayd towne of Calys agayne.

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MarginaliaTruce concluded betwene Englande and Fraunce.After the winning thus of Calys as hath been premised, kyng Edward remainyng in the sayd towne a certeine space, was in consultation concernyng hys viage & procedyng farther into Fraunce. But by meanes of the foresayd Cardinals, truce for a certeine tyme was takē, and instrumentes made (so prouided) that certeine noble mē as well for þe Frēch king as for the king of England, should come to the pope ther to debate vpon the articles. Vnto þe which K. Edward, for peace sake was not greatly disagreyng. Whiche was. an. 1347. Ex Rob. Aues.

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MarginaliaAn. 1348
A vehement pestilence in England.
The next yeare folowyng whiche was. an. 1348. fell a sore plage, whiche they call the first generall pestilence in the realme of England. This plage (as they say) first springyng from the East, and so spredyng Westward, did so mightely preuaile here in this lande, begynnyng first at Dorcester and the coūtreis there about: that euery day lyghtly xx. some dayes xl. some lx. and mo dead courses were brought & layd together in one pitte. This begynning the first day of August: by the first of Nouēber it came to Lōdon. Where as the vehemēt rage therof was so hoate, and did increase so much: that from the first day of February, til about the begynnyng of May in a churchyard then newly made by Smithfield, MarginaliaNow called the charter house church yard.aboue CC. dead corses euery day were buryed, besides them whiche in other churchyardes of the citie were layd also. At length by the grace of Christ, ceasyng there, it proceded from thence to the Northpartes. Where also the next yere after. an. 1349. it swaged.

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MarginaliaAn. 1350
Calice almost lost by treason
After this, in the next yeare insuing, anno. 1350. the towne of Calis was by treason of the keeper of the castle, almost betrayed and wonne from the English men. MarginaliaThe death of the Frēch kingWythin the compasse of whych yeare, dyed Phillip the French kyng. After whome king Iohn hys sonne succeded in the crowne. MarginaliaAn. 1351.Who the next yeare after vnder false pretence of friendship, caused the Constable of Fraunce Earle of Ewe to be beheaded: who being taken prysoner before in warre by Englishmen, and long deteyned in pryson in England, was licensed by kyng Edwarde to visit hys country of Fraunce. MarginaliaThe towne of Gwynes takenIn the same yeare the towne of Gwynes was taken by English mē, while the kepers of the holde were negligent and a slepe.

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MarginaliaAn. 1352
Victory of syr Roger Bentole
The yeare next folowyng, the Marshall of Fraunce with a great armey was put to flight, by Syr Roger Bentele knyght and capitaine in Britanie, hauyng but onely 600. souldiers with hym. In this battaile were takē ix. knightes, esquiers & gentlemen. 140. The Frēch men and Britanes, by this victory were excedyngly discouraged, and their pride cut done.

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MarginaliaFyrst Duke of Lancaster,In the yere after, was Hēry first made duke of Lācaster, whiche before was Earle of Derby and Lancaster. Also diuers good ordinaunces were appointed in the parlament at Westminster. Whiche after by auarice, & parciall fauour of the head men, were agayne vndone.

MarginaliaAn. 1354Concorde and agrement about the yeare. 1354. begā to come wel forward, & instruments were drawen vpon the same, betwene the ii. kynges. MarginaliaPope Innocent the sixt.But that the matter beyng brought vp to pope Innocēt 6. partly by the quarelyng of the Frēch men, partly by the wynkyng of the pope, whiche euer helde with the French side, the conditions were repealed, which were these: That to the king of Englande, all the dukedome of Aquitanie with other landes there, should be to hym restored, wtout homage to the Frēch kyng. And þt kyng Edward agayn should surrēder to him all his right & title, which he had in Frāce: wherupon rose the occasiō of great warre and tumulte: whiche folowed after betwene the ii. realmes.

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MarginaliaChro. Adami Murimouth canonici D. Pauli de gestis Edward. 1.
1355.
Yt folowed after this, þe yeare of our lord. 1355. þt king Edward hearyng of the death of Philip þe French king, and that kyng Ihon his sonne, had graunted the dukedome of Aquitanie to Charles his eldest sonne and Dolphin of Viēna sent ouer prince Edward with the Earle of Warwike, of Salisbury, of Oxford, and with them a sufficiēt nūber of able souldiours, into Aquitania. Wher he beyng willingly receaued of diuers, þe rest he subdued: partly by force of sword, partly receaued, submitting thē selues to his protection. MarginaliaThe thyrde viage of K. Edward into Fraunce.Not long after this in the same yeare, word beyng brought to kyng Edward that Ihon the French kyng was ready to meete him at S. Oiners there to geue him battaile, gathered his power and set ouer to Calys with his ii. sonnes Leonelle Erle of Wilton: & Ihon of Gaunt, Earle of Richmond: and with Hēry duke of Lācaster. &c. MarginaliaThe French king refuseth to ioin in battayle with king Edward.Who being come to S. Oiuers, the Frēch kyng with a mighty armie of his franclyngs hearing of his commyng, the nerer he approched to thē the further retired they backe: wastyng & destroyng behynd them, to the entent that the Englishe armie in pursuing thē should finde no vitals. By reason wherof, king Edward folowyng hym by the space of ix. or x. dayes vnto Haden (when neither he could finde his enemie to fight, nor victuals or forage for his armie) he returned vnto Calys: Where warre agayne beyng offered in the name of the kyng vpon vnstable conditions, and yet the same not performed, kyng Edward seyng the shrinking of his enemie, frō Calys crossed the seas into England: where he recouered agayne the towne of Barwicke, whiche the Scots before by subtile traine had gotten. MarginaliaFifty shyllynges for euerye sacke of wool caryed out of England.At which time was graūted vnto the king in parlamēt 50. s. for euery sacke or packe of wull that should bee caried ouer, for the space of vi. yeares together. By the whiche graunt, the kyng might despend euery day by estmatiō aboue a C. markes sterlyng. MarginaliaThe custōe of wool for vi yeares 15000. poūdes sterling to kyng Edward.And for as much as euery yere C. M. sackes of wull were thought to be exported out of the realme: þe sōme thereof for vi. yeres space was estemed to moūt to xv. hundred thousand pound sterling.

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Marginalia1356.The same yeare, when kyng Edward had recouered Barwicke, & subdued Scotland: prince Edward being in Gascome, made toward the French kyng. Who notwithstandyng by the way all þe bridges were cast down, and great resistāce made: yet the victorious prince makyng way with his sworde, after much slaughter of the Frenche men, and manye prisoners taken: at lengthe ioynyng wt the French K. at Poyters, scarse with ii. M. gaue the ouerthrow to þe French Kyng with vij. M. mē of armes and mo. MarginaliaThe French king taken prisoner by prince Edward.In whiche conflict the French kyng him selfe, and Philip his sonne with L. Iames of Bourbon, þe Archb. of Senon. xi. earles. 22. Lordes were taken. Of other warriers & mē of armes aboue 2000. Some affirm in this conflict were slayne. 2. Dukes, of Lordes & noble men 24. of mē of armes 2000. of other souldiers aboue viij. M. The cōmon report is, that mo French men wer there take prisoners, then was the number of thē whiche toke them. This noble victory gottē by the grace of God, brought no litle admiration to all men.

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Yt were to long, and litle perteyning to the purpose of this history to comprehend in order all the doynges of this kyng, with the circumstances of his victories, of the bryngyng in of the French kyng into Englād, of his abode there, of the raunsom leuied on him and of Dauid the Scottish kyng, of whiche the one was rated at three millions of Scutes, MarginaliaEuery Scute valuing vi. shillings viii. pencethe other at C. thousande markes to be payd in x. yeares, howe the staple was after translated to Calys, with suche lyke, I referre them that would see more, to the Chronicle of Rob. Auesb. of S. Albans, of Ioh. Froysard. Adam Mirymouth, who discourse all this at large. 

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Anti-papal writers

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

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