Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
963 [963]

K. Henry. 8. The progenie of king Henry. 7. Dissension among fryers.

ditious tumulte of Perkyn Werbecke, MarginaliaPerkin Werbecke which fained himselfe to be K. Edwardes sonne. with his retinue. an. 1494. also of MarginaliaBlackheath field.Blackheath field by þe blacke Smith. an. 1496. I might also haue recited the glorious commendation of Georgius Lilius in his Latine Chronicle testifiyng of king Henry. 7. howe he sent iij. solemne Oratours to pope Iulius 2. to yelde his obedience vnto the sea of Rome. an. 1506. and lykewise how Pope Alexander 9. Pius 3. and Iulius 2. sent to the sayd kyng Henry 7. three sondry famous Ambassadours with iij. swoordes, and iij. cappes of maintenaunce, electyng and admittyng hym to be the chief defendour of the fayth. The commendation of whiche fact, how glorious it is in the eyes of Georgius Lilius, and Fabiā, that I leaue to them. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe undoubtedly learned of Lily's account of this episode from Bale,who characteristically asserted that Lily 'gloriatur Henricum septimum hanc adorasseBabylonicam bestiam ac monstram Sodomiticum' (Catalogus, p. 645). Bale does notcite Fabyan. The account of the three orators being sent to the Pope is from George Lily, Chronicon (Frankfurt, 1560), fo. 66v. The account of embassies sent by the popes to Henry VII is from Robert Fabyan, The Chronicle of Fabian (London, 1559),STC 10663, p. 535.

[Back to Top]
This I suppose, that when kyng Henry sent to Pope Iulius his iij. oratours with obedience, if hee had sent hym three thousand harquebuziers to furnishe his field agaynst the Frenche kyng fightyng at Rauenna, he had pleased Pope Iulius much better. If Georgius Lilius had bene disposed to illustrate his story with notes, this had bene more worthy the notyng, MarginaliaEx Masseo lib. 20.howe Ludouike 12. Frenche kyng callyng his Parlament, moued this question agaynst Pope Iulius: whether a Pope might inuade any prince by warrelyke force, without cause, and whether the prince myght withdraw his obedience from that Pope or not? and it was concluded in the same Parlament with the kyng, agaynst the Pope. 
Commentary  *  Close

Although Foxe cites Christian Massaeus as his source, he is drawingon Bale, Catalogus, p. 643, which gives the same citation from Massaeus.

Also it was concluded the same tyme (whiche was in the reigne of this king Henry 7. that the Marginalia* Pragmatica sanctio, was a practising or a determination of a certain parlement in Frāce against the bishop of Rome, in defence of certaine matters of religion concluded in the Councel of Basill.* Pragmaticall sanction 
Commentary  *  Close

The Pragmatic Sanction of Bourges upheld the autonomous authority of the church of France and disallowed papal nominations to vacant benefices. Thesanction was issued in 1438, not, as Foxe claims, in the reign of Henry VII (1485-1509).

should be receaued in ful force and effect, through all the realme of Fraunce.

[Back to Top]

And forsomuch as we are fallen in to þe mention of Georgius Lilius, this in hym is to be found not vnworthye notyng, howe after the burnyng of Thomas Noryce, aboue mentioned, pag. 218. at the Citie of Norwiche, MarginaliaA note of Gods plagues folowing the burning of his people.the same yeare folowed such a fire in Norwiche, that the whole Citie, wel nere, was therewith consumed. 

Commentary  *  Close

Bale (Catalogus, p. 644) notes that Lily mentions the fire inNorwich and Bale concludes that it was providential revenge for the execution ofNoris. Lily, who recorded the fire (George Lily, Chronicon [Frankfurt, 1560], fo. 67r) said nothing about Noris. On Noris see John Bale, Scriptorum Illustrium maioris Brytanniae…Catalogus (Basel, 1557), p. 644. Bale has an additional detail not in Foxe: Noris was from Brockforth, Suffolk.

[Back to Top]
Ex Geor. Lilio. Like as also after the burnyng of the foresayd good aged father in Smithfield, the same yeare (whiche was. 1500) we read in the Chronicle of Fabian a great plague to fall vppon the Citie of London, to the greate destruction of the inhabitantes therof. Wherin agayne is to bee noted (as is aforesayde) that accordyng to þe state of the Churche, the dispostition of the common wealthe commonly is guyded, either to be with aduersitie afflicted or elles in prosperitie to flourishe. 
Commentary  *  Close

In the continuation of Fabyan's chronicle, the entry for a devastatingplague in London, immediately follows the entry recording the burning of an 'oldeheretick' in 1500. The chronicler did not associate the two incidents (Robert Fabyan, The Chronicle of Fabian [London, 1559], STC 10663, p. 532). On the heretic burnedin 1500 see The Great Chronicle of London, ed. A. H. Thomas andI. D. Thornley [London, 1938], p. 294 and Fabyan’s Chronicle, ed. H. Ellis [London,1911], p. 687.

[Back to Top]
But after these notes of kyng Henry 7. now to the story of kyng Henry 8.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe children & ofspring of K. Henry. 7.This kyng Henry 7. finishyng his course in the yeare abouesayd, which was. 1509. had by Elisabeth his wife aboue named, iiij. men children, and of wemen children as many. Of whome, iij. onely suruiued: to wytte prince Henry, Lady Margaret, and Lady Mary. Of whō kyng Henry the viij. after his father succeded. MarginaliaLady Margaret maried to K. Iames 4. of Scotland.Lady Margaret was maryed to Iames the iiij. kyng of Scottes. MarginaliaLady Margaret maried to the K. of Castile.Lady Mary was affied to Charles kyng of Castile.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaPrince Arthur maryed to Lady Catherin daughter to the Spanish kyng.Not lōg before the death of king Henry, Prince Arthur his elder sonne had espoused Lady Catherine, daughter to Ferdinandus, beyng of the age of xv. yeares, and she about the age of xvij. MarginaliaThe death of prince Arthur.and shortly after his mariage, within v. monethes, departed at Ludlow, and was buryed at Worceter. After whose decease the succession of þe crown fell next to kyng Henry the viij. beyng of the age of xviij. yeares, who entred his reigne the yeare of our Lorde. 1509. MarginaliaK. Henry marieth Lady Catherin hys brothers wyfe.and shortly after maryed with the foresayd Catherine, his late brother prince Arthurs wife, to the ende that her dowrie beyng great, should not bee transported out of the land. MarginaliaBlynd dispensations of the pope.In the which his mariage beyng more politique, then Scripture lyke, he was dispensed with by Pope Iulius, at the request of Ferdinandus her father. The reigne of this kyng continued with great noblenes and fame, the space of 38. yeares. Duryng whose tyme and reigne was great alteration of thynges, as well to þe ciuill state of the realme, as especially to the state ecclesiastical, and matters of the Churche apperteyning. For by hym was exiled and abolished out of the realme the vsurped power of the Bysh. of Rome, Idolatrie & superstition somewhat repressed, Images and pilgrimages defaced, abbays and monasteries pulled downe, sectes of Religiō rooted out, scriptures reduced to þe knowledge of the vulgare tongue, and the state of the Churche and Religion redressed. Concernyng all which thyngs, in the proces of this volume here folowing, we wil endeuour (Christ willyng) particularly & in order to discourse: after that first we shal comprehende a few matters, which within the beginning of his reigne are to be noted & collected. Where, leauyng of to write of Empson and Dudley, who in the tyme of kyng Henry the vij. beyng great doers in executyng the penall lawes ouer the people at that tyme, and purchasyng thereby more malice then landes, wyth that whiche they had gotten, were shortlye after the entryng of this kyng beheaded, the one a knighte, the other an Esquyre: leauing also to intermedel with his warres, triumphes and other temporall affayres, 

Commentary  *  Close

It is rather remarkable that Foxe mentions Empson and Dudley at all.Edmund Dudley was the grandfather of Robert Dudley, the earl of Leicester, who wasa sponsor of the Acts and Monuments. Foxe probably included this brief mention of them as a warning to evil counsellors. This warning would almost certainly have been more strident if it were not for Edmund Dudley's good fortune in descendants.

[Back to Top]
we meane in this volume principally to bestow our trauaile in declaration of matters concernyng most chiefly the state of the Churche & of Religion, as well in this Churche of England, as also of the whole Churche of Rome.

[Back to Top]

Wherin first commeth to our handes a turbulent tragedie and a fierce contētion, 

Commentary  *  Close
Dissension among mendicant orders

This section of the Acts and Monuments consists of three separatestrands. The first, and largest, is on account of the late medieval debates over the Immaculate Conception, which Foxe casts as a doctrinal schism between theFranciscans and the Dominicans. (Foxe's purpose in this was twofold: to discredit the mendicant orders and also to turn the charge of doctrinal disunity, frequently employed by the Catholics against the Protestants, back upon the Catholics). The second strand is a brief account of a notorious case of fraud that led to the execu-tion of four Dominicans in Berne in 1509; again, Foxe's objective was to discreditthe mendicant orders. He also used the episode to denounce the 'superstition' ofthe Church before Luther (he also used the debate over the Immaculate Conception and the Jetzer affair to denounce this 'superstition'). Finally, Foxe has a caustic summary of the bellicose career of Julius II.

[Back to Top]

Foxe's sources for this section are interesting and reveal something of bothhis wide reading in incunabula and his continuing contacts with the Continent. Foxe'saccount of the debates over the Immaculate Conception as taken entirely from Jodocus Clichtoveus's De puritate conceptionis beatae Mariae virginis (Paris, 1513).This work, by a highly respected Sorbonne theologian, sought to defend the immaculist position against Dominican attacks. (For a discussion of De puritatesee J-P Massaut, Critique et tradition à la vielle de la Réforme en France [Paris,1974], pp. 37-45). Foxe cites Peucer's edition of Carion's chronicle, Sebastion Munster's Cosmographia and Bale's Catalogus as sources for his account of thescandal at Berne. Undoubtedly Foxe read their brief accounts of the episode, buthe bases his account on - directly or indirectly - on Johann Stumpf's chronicleand possibly on Thomas Murner's scathing account of the affair. For Julius II, Foxe, as was often the case, turned to Bale.

[Back to Top]

Thomas S. Freeman
University of Sheffield

whiche long before had troubled the Church, and now this present yeare. 1509. was renewed a fresh betwene ij. certeine orders of beggyng Friers, to witte, the Dominicke Friers, and the Fraunciscanes, about the conception of the Virgine Mary, the mother of Christ.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaFranciscane Friers.The Fraunciscanes were they, whiche did hold of S. Fraunces, and folowed the rule of his Testament commonly called Gray Friers, or Minorites. Their opinion was this: that the Virgine Mary preuented by þe grace of þe holy Gost was so sanctified, that she was neuer subiect one moment in her conception, to Originall sinne. MarginaliaDominicke Friers.The Dominicke Friers were they, which holdyng of Dominicke, wer commōly called Blacke Friers, or preachyng Friers. Their opinion was, that the Virgin Mary was conceaued, as all other children of Adam be: so that this priuilege only belōgeth to Christ, to be cōceaued without Originall sinne: notwithstandyng the sayd blessed Virgine was sanctified in her mothers wombe, and purged from her Originall sinne, so as was Iohn Baptist, Ieremie, or anye other priuileged person. MarginaliaA troblous dissension in the church for the conception of the Vyrgin Mary.This friuolous question kindlyng and gendryng betweene these twoo sectes of Friers, brast out in suche a flame of partes and sides taking, that it occupied the heades & wittes, scholes, and vniuersities almost through the whole Church, 

Commentary  *  Close

Notice how Foxe exaggerates what was admittedly an intense debateinto a virtual schism which threatened to engulf Christendom.

some holdyng one parte with Scotus, some þe other parte with Thom. Aquine. MarginaliaWhether the virgyn Mary was conceaued wythout orygynall synne.The Minorites holdyng with Scotus their maister, disputed and concluded, that she was conceaued without all spotte or note of Original sinne, and therupō caused the feast and seruice of the conception of S. Mary the Virgine to be celebrate and solemnised in þe Church. Contrary the Dominicke Friers takyng syde with Aquinas, preached that it was heresie to affirme that the blessed Virgine was conceaued without þe gylte of Originall sinne: and that they whiche did celebrate the feast of her Conception, or sayd any Masses thereof, did sinne greuously and mortally.

[Back to Top]

In the meane tyme, as this phantasie waxed hoate in the Church, þe one side preachyng against the other, came Pope Sixtus the iiij. an. 1476. who ioynyng side with the Minorites or Franciscanes, firste sent forthe his decree 

Commentary  *  Close

All of the material on Sixtus IV's decree comes from Jodocus Clichtoveus, De puritate conceptionis beatae Mariae virginis (Paris, 1513), fos.22v-23v.

by the authoritie Apostolike, MarginaliaA new found faast of the conception of the Virgyn Marywillyng, ordeynyng, and cōmaundyng all men to solemnise this new founde feast of the Conception in holy Churche for euermore: offeryng to all men and wemen, whiche deuoutly frequenting the church, would heare Masse and seruice, from þe first euensong of the sayd feast, to the octaues of the same, as many dayes of Pardon, as Pope Vrbane the iiij. and Pope Martine the v. did graunt for hearyng the seruice of Corpus Christi day. &c. and this decree was geuen and dated at Rome. an. 1476.

[Back to Top]

Moreouer the same Pope, to the entent that þe deuotiō of þe people, might be the more encouraged to the celebration of this Conception, he added a clause more to the

Aue
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield