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1050 [1049]

K. Henry. 8. The Mariage of Queene Anne. The Christening of Lady Elizabeth.

ned, as the vnlearned: her lyfe beyng also directed accordyng to the same, as her weekely almes did manifestly declare: MarginaliaThe great almes of Queene Anne. Who besides the ordinary of a C. crownes, and other apparell that she gaue wekely a yeare before she was crowned, both to men and wemen, gaue also wonderfull much priuy almes to widowes and other poore housholders continually till she was apprehended, and she euer gaue three or fower pound at a tyme to the poore people, to buy them Kine with all, and sent her Subamner to the townes about where she lay, that the parishoners should make a bill of all the poore housholders in their parish and some townes receiued vij. viij. or x. pound to buy kyne with all, according as the number of the poore in the townes were. She also mainteyned many learned men in Cambridge. Likewise did the Erle of Wiltshire her father, and the lord Rochford her brother, and by them these men were brought in fauour with the king: of whom some are yet aliue and can testifie the same, which would to God they were now as great professours of the Gospell of Christ, as then they appeared to be, MarginaliaHeath. Thirlby. L Paget. which were Doct. Heath, and D. Thirlby: with whom was ioyned MarginaliaL. Paget a mainteyner of D. Barnes. the lord Paget, who at that present was an earnest Protestāt, and gaue vnto one Raynold West, Luthers bookes, and other bookes of the Germaines, as Franciscus Lambertus, de Sectis 

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This refers to a book of François Lambert of Avignon entitled Commentarii in Regulam Minoritarum, et contra universas perditionis Sectas (of 1525).

, and at that tyme he read Melancthons Rhetorike 
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This refers to Philip Melanchthon's treatise of 1521, entitled Institutiones Rhetoricae.

openly in Trinitie hall in Cambridge, and was with his master Gardiner 
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Foxe is making a reference to the fact that Stephen Gardiner had been for quite some time master of Trinity Hall (1525-51, 1553-5).

a mainteyner of D. Barnes 
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Robert Barnes and William Paget both held Lutheran ideas, so it is very unlikely that Gardiner maintained Barnes in any serious capacity outside the latter's early academic career.

and all the Protestants that were then in Cambridge, and holpe many religious persons out of their cowles.

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MarginaliaThe praise of Queene Anne. It hath ben reported vnto vs by diuers credible persons which were about this Queene, and [illegible text] acquainted with her doyngs concernyng her liberall and bountifull distribution to the poore, how her grace caried euer about her a certayne litle purse, out of the which she was wont daily to scatter abroad some almes to the needy, thinkyng no day well spent, wherein some man had not fared the better by some benefite at her handes. And this I write by the relation of certayne noble personages which were chiefe & principall of her wayting maydes about her, especially the Dnches of Richmond by name.

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Also concerning the order of her ladies and gentlewomē about her, one that was her silke woman, MarginaliaThe name of this [illegible text] Wilkinson. a Gentlewoman not now alyue, but of great credite and also of fame for her [illegible text] doyngs, did credibly reporte, MarginaliaThe good order of the Court in Queene Annes tyme. that in all her tyme she neuer saw better order amongst the ladies and gentlewomē of the Court, then was in this good Queenes dayes, who kept her maydes and suche as were about her so occupied in sowyng and workyng of shyrtes and smockes for the poore, that neither was there sene any idlenes then amongst them, nor any leisure to follow such passetymes as daily are sene now a dayes to raigne in princes courtes.

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MarginaliaThe king diuorced from Ladye Catherine & frō the Pope both at one tyme. Thus the kyng being diuorced from the lady Dowager hys brothers wyfe, maried this gracious Lady, makyng a prosperous and happy chaunge for vs, beyng diuorced from the foresayd Princesse and also from the Pope both at one tyme. Notwithstandyng as good and godly purposes are neuer without some incommoditie or trouble followyng, so it happened in this diuorcement that the sayd Princesse procuring from Rome the Popes curse, caused both þe king and the realme to be interdited: 

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An interdict is the suspension of all church activities. Foxe may be exaggerating here. England had been placed under interdict in the reign of John (1208), but Clement only threatened this action (which proved moot in due course anyway). [See, T C Price Zimmermann, 'A Note on Clement VII and the Divorce of Henry VIII', in The English Historical Review 82:324 (July 1967), pp.548-52].

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wherof more is hereafter to be spoken.

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MarginaliaAn. 1533.
Queene Anne crowned.
In the meane tyme Queene Anne, shortly after her Mariage beyng great with chylde, the next yeare followyng which was. 1533. after the first diuorcement publikely proclaymed, was crowned with 

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Anne was crowned queen on 1 June 1533.

high solemnitie at Westminster: MarginaliaQueene Elizabeth borne. and not long after her Coronation, the vij. day of September she was brought a bedde, and deliuered of a fayre Ladye, for whose good deliueraunce Te Deum was song in all places, and great preparation made for the christenyng. 
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The account is basically taken out of Hall's Chronicle [for which, see Edward Hall, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancastre & York, 2 vols., ed. by H Ellis (London, 1809), ii, p.805].

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The Mayor and hys brethren with xl. of the chiefe Citizens were commaunded to be present with all the Nobles and Gentlemen. The kynges Pallace and all the wals betwene that and the Friers, was hanged with Arras, and the Friers Churche. Also the Fonte was of siluer, and stood in the midst of the Churche three steppes hygh, which was couered with a fine cloth, and dyuers Gentlemē wyth aprons and towels about their neckes, gaue attendaunce about it. Ouer the Fonte hong a fayre Canapy of crimisone satten fringed with Golde. About it was a rayle couered with Saie. Betwene the Quire and the body of the church was a close place with a panne of fire to make the childe ready in. These thinges thus ordered, the childe was brought into the Hall, and then euery man set forward. First the citizens ij. and ij. Then the Gentlemen, Esquiers and Chapleins. Next after folowed the Aldermen and the Mayor alone. Next the Mayor followed the kyngs Councell. Then the kynges Chappell. Then Barons Byshops and Erles. Then came the Earle of Essex, bearyng the couered Ba sons gilt. After hym the Marques of Exeter with the taper of Virgin waxe. Next hym, the Marques Dorset bearyng the Salt. Behynde hym the Lady Mary of Northfolke bearyng the Chrisome which was very rich of Perle and stone. The olde Duches of Morthfolke bare the chylde in a mantle of purple Veluet, with a long trayne furred with Ermine. The Duke of Northfolke with hys Marshall rod went on the right hand of the sayd Duchesse, and the Duke of Suffolke on the left hand. Before them went the Officers of armes. The Countesse of Kent bare the long trayne of the childes mantell. Betwene the Countesse and the chyld, went the Erle of Wilshire on the right hand, and the Erle of Darby on the left hand, supportyng the sayd trayne. In the middest ouer the chylde was borne a Canapy by the lord Rochford the Lord Hussey, the lord William Haward, and the lord Thomas Haward the elder. In this order they came vnto the Church dore where the Byshop of London mette it, wyth dyuers Abbottes and Byshops, and began the obseruaunces of the Sacrament. MarginaliaCranmer godfather to Queene Elizabeth. The Archbishop of Caunterbury was Godfather, and the olde Duchesse of Northfolke, and the olde Marchionesse of Dorset wydowes, were Godmothers, and the childe was named Elizabeth.

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After all thynges were done at the Churche doore, the child was brought to þe Fonte and Christened. This done, Garter the chief kyng of Armes cryed aloud: God of his infinite goodnes send prosperous lyfe and long, to the hygh and mighty Princesse of England, ELIZABETH. Then the Trumpettes blewe, and the child was brought vp to þe aultare, and immediatly confirmed by the Archbyshop the Marchionesse of Exceter beyng Godmother. Then the Archbyshop of Canterbury gaue to the Princesse a standyng cuppe of Gold. The Duchesse of Northfolke gaue to her a standyng cuppe of Gold, fretted with Pearle. The Marchionesse of Dorset, three gilt boles pounced, with a couer. The Marchionesse of Exeter, three standyng boles gilt and grauen with a couer. And so after a solemne banket ended with Ipocras wafers and such lyke in great plenty, they returned in lyke order agayne vnto the Courte, with the Princesse, and so departed.

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At the Mariage of this noble Lady, as there was no small ioy vnto all good and godly men, and no lesse hope of prosperous successe to Gods true Religion, so in lyke maner on the contrary part, the Papistes wanted not their malicious and secrete attemptes, as by the false hypocrisie and fained holynes of a false fayned hypocrite this yeare beyng espyed and found out, may sufficientlye appeare what their deuilishe deuises & purposes were. For certeine Mōks, Friers, and other euill disposed persons, of a deuilishe intent, had put into the heades of many of the kynges subiectes, that they had reuelation of God and his Saintes, þt he was highly displeased with kyng Henry, for the diuorcement of the Lady Katherine, MarginaliaThe maide of Kent with her false fained hipocrisie apprehended. and surmised amongest other thinges, that God had reueled to a Nunne, named Elizabeth Barton, 

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Elizabeth Barton is the subject of at least one good biography and a recent article by Richard Rex. [See, Alan Neame, The Holy Maid of Kent: The Life of Elizabeth Barton 1506-1534 (London, 1971) and Richard Rex, 'The execution of the Holy Maid of Kent', in Historical Research 64:155 (October, 1991), pp.216-20.]

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whom they called the holy mayde of Kent, that in case the kyng proceded in the sayd diuorce, he should not be kyng of this realme, one moneth after, and in the reputation of God, not one day nor houre. This Elizabeth Barton by false dissimulation practised and shewed to the people, merueilous alteration of her visage and other partes of her body, as if she had bene rapt or in a traunce, & in those fayned traunces by false hipocrisie (as though shee had bene inspired of God) she spake many wordes in rebukyng of sinne, and reprouyng the Gospell which shee called herisie, and among them vttered diuers thinges to the great reproch of the kyng and Queene & to the establishing of Idolatrie, Pilgrimage, and the derogation of Gods glory: whiche her naughtines beyng spyed out by the great labour and diligence of the Archbyshop of Caunterbury, the Lorde Cromwell, and Maister Hugh Latimer 
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At this time he was the rector of West Kington, Wiltshire (1531) and soon to be bishop of Worcester (from 12 August 1535).

, shee was condemned and put to death with certeine of her affinitie & Councell in the moneth of Aprill. an. 1533. MarginaliaElizabeth Bartō wyth her cōspiratores The names of whiche conspiratours with her, were these: Edward Bockyng, Monke of Canterbury. Richard Master, Person of Aldingtō. Iohn Deryng, Monke of Canterbury. Hugh Riche, Frier Warden of the Gray Friers of Canterbury. Richard Risby. Henry Gold, bachelor of Diuinitie, and Person of Aldermary. Fisher Byshop of Rochester. Iohn Adeson Priest, his Chaplein Thomas Laurence, þe Byshops Register of Canterbury. Edwarde Thwates. 
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Edward Thwaites' treatise A marvellous work (an account of the nun's miracles and prophecies) was printed at the Robert Redmen press of London (1527). The treatise was referred to 'as very popular' by Cranmer in a letter of 1533 [for which see, Diane Watt, Secretaries of God: Women Prophets in Late Medieval and Early Modern England (Cambridge, 2001), p.58; Miscellaneous Writings and Letters of Thomas Cranmer, 2 vols. ed. by J E Cox (Cambridge, 1846), ii, p.273]. Other men on the list include Thomas Abel (the author of Invicta veritas).

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Thomas Abell. Of the which persons the said Elizabeth Berton, Henry Gold, Richard Master, Edward Bockyng, Iohn Deryng, Hugh Riche, Richard Risby, were attainted of treason by Acte of Parliament, and put to execution. 
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20 April 1534.

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The residue, as Fisher Byshop of Rochester, Thomas Gold, Thomas Laurence, Edward Thwates, Iohn Adeson, Thomas Abell, beyng conuicte and atteynted of

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