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1102 [1101]

K. Henry. 8. The aunsweres of Iohn Lambert to the Byshops Articles.

ly see, that he would haue all men, none except, to mary, wātyng the gifte of continencie. This (quod he) I say to the vnmaried and widowes: expedient it were for them to remayne as I do: but if they cannot liue continent, let them contract mariage, for better it is to mary then to burn. MarginaliaMariage necessary for all men, whosoeuer lacke continencie of hart. This proueth well that all priestes wanting continency of hart, had nede to mary for to auoid burnyng lust, vnles they be inobedient to the mynd of Christ, that spake in Paule, in obseruyng the traditions of men.

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In the beginnyng also of the same Chapter, he sayth: It is good that a man should not deale with a woman. Notwithstanding for auoyding fornication (quod he) let euery man haue his wyfe, and euery woman haue her husband. MarginaliaQuisque, Quæque, not quidem quædam. He sayth here: Quisque & quæque, euery man & euery womam: and not quidam nec quædam, some man nor some woman. He excepteth neither priest ne nunne, but euery both mā & womā is bound for auoyding of burnyng and fornication to mary, not hauyng the gift geuen of chastitie.

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The same also confirmeth your own law. dist. 29. where it is written thus: Si quis discernit præsbyterum coniugatum, tanquam occasione nuptiarum, quòd offerre non debeat, anathema sit. MarginaliaDist. xxix. If any man do hold that a priest being maried, in that respect that he is maried, ought not to minister in hys function: be he accursed. And in the 31. dist. Si quis vituperat nuptias, & dormientem cum viro suo fidelem, ac religiosam detestatur, aut culpabilē æstimat, velut quæ regnum Dei introire non possit, anathema sit. MarginaliaMariage left free by the Popes law.
Dist. xxxi.
If any man shall finde fault with matrimony, and detest a faythfull and deuout woman lying with her husband, and thynke her culpable, as one that could not therfore, enter in to the kingdom of God: be he accursed. And euery where els, such lyke are to be seene.

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MarginaliaPaphnutius. Moreouer, in historia tripartita, it is written, that a noble Martyr of Christ called Paphnutius, in Nicene Councell, when all other bishops were purposed to haue enacted there that priestes should liue vnmaried, this holy man resisted thē so mightily both with reasons, and also with authority of scripture, MarginaliaMariage permitted free by the Councell of Nice. that then theyr purpose altered, & theyr first deuise could not passe. And one authority I remember was this, which he borowed of Paul in the second epistle to Timoth. Your deuise (quod he) may haue a semblance of holines: but in dede it shall be the destruction and vndoyng of the same.

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MarginaliaLes illustrations de gaullet. Moreouer, in one of the principall histories of Fraunce called, Les illustrations de gaulles. Whosoeuer please, may there read it as it standeth, within 6. leaues afore the end of the same: how the author with depe sorrow lamenteth the ordinance that decreed first, priests to lyue vnmaried, shewing, and that amply, the miseries that haue ensued in Frāce therby, imputyng it vnto Calix the pope: of whom he maketh a doleful mention in Meter, wherof the first I yet remember, and it is thus: O sancte Calixte, totus mundus odit te. &c. O holy Calixte, al the world hateth thee. Which followeth in writyng to all that lust to behold therein. MarginaliaRead afore, pag. 199. But what nede I to make longer treatise hereof, for so much as you do daily both heare and see, what foule abhomination ariseth in euery corner, MarginaliaMen will be wiser then God. of this pitious law made of men that would presume to be wyser then God, thinkyng (as we euer do) that eyther he would not, or els for lacke of wisdome he could not shew vs a sufficient law or way, to direct our lyfe and conuersation, to come to the ioy and restyng place of hym promised, and so of vs longed and looked for. Wherby we both be farre vnreasonable in so deemyng of him after our vnwyse wit, and he much dishonoured. The which I besech hym to helpe. Amen.

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MarginaliaAuuswere to the 5. article. ¶ Vnto the v. where ye do aske, whether I beleue that whatsoeuer is done of man, whether it be good or ill, commeth of necessity: that is (as you construe) to wit, whether man hath free wyll, so that he may deserue ioy or payne? I say (as I sayd at the beginnyng) that vnto the first part of your riddle, I neyther can, ne wyl geue any diffinitiue aunswer, forsomuch as it surmounteth my capacitie, trustyng that God shall sende hereafter, other that shall be of better learnyng and wit then I for to endite it. As cōcernyng the second part, where as you do interpret, that is to say, MarginaliaFree will to deserue ioy or payne. whether man haue free wyll or no, so that he may deserue ioy or payne: as for our deseruyng specially of ioy, I thinke it very slender or none, euen when we do the very commaundementes and law of God, and that am I taught by our sauiour, in s. Luke where he sayth thus: Which of you (quod he) hauyng a seruant that hath eared your land, or fed your beasts, wil say vnto him, whē he cōeth home out of the field, go thy way quickly, & sit down to thy meat: & rather wil not say vnto him, make redy my supper, seruing me therat vntil I haue made an end therof, and afterward take thy selfe meat and drinke. Thinke you that he is boūd to thāke his seruaunt which thus shall doe hys commaundement? I trow (sayth he) nay. Euen so you (sayth he) when you haue done al things to you commaunded, say yet you be vnprofitable seruāts, & haue done that which you wer boūd to do. MarginaliaMerites not to be esteemed. In which wordes you may clearly see, that he would not haue vs greatly esteme our merites, when wee haue done that is commaunded by God, but rather reckenyng our selues to be but seruantes vnprofitable to God, for somuch as he hath no nede of our well doyng, for his owne auauncement, but onely that he loueth to see vs doe well for our owne behoufe: and moreouer, that when we haue done hys byddyng, we ought not so to magnifie, neither our selfe, ne our owne free wyll, but laud hym with a meeke hart, thorowe whose benefite we haue done (if at any tyme we doe it) hys lykyng and pleasure: not regardyng our merite, but hys grace and benefite, wherby onely is done all that in anye wise is to him acceptable. MarginaliaObseruing of Godes workes worketh in vs no merite: Ergo much lesse the obseruing of mens traditions. And thus if we ought not to attende our merites in doyng the commaundement of God, much lesse shoulde we looke for merite, for obseruyng our owne inuentions, or traditions of them, vnto whiche there is no benefite in all Scripture which Paul calleth þe word of truth and of fayth, promised.

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But here may be obiected against me, that the rewarde is promised in many places to them that do obserue the preceptes of God. That I affirme to be very soth. Notwithstandyng such rewarde shal neuer be atteyned of vs, except by the grace and benefite of hym, which worketh all things in all creatures. And this affirmeth well S. Augustin, S. Ambrose, Fulgentius, with other, as you may see euery where in their workes, MarginaliaVnio dissidentium. and specially in the treatise called Vnio dissidentium, where he entreateth de gratia & meritis MarginaliaReward how it is promised to workes. And of S, Augustine I remember. ij. or. iij. right notable sentences, concernyng the same. One is in the 9. booke of his Confessions, in this fourme: Væ etiam laudabili vitæ hominum, si remota misericordia discutias eam. Quia verè non exquiris delicta, vehementer fiducialiter speramus aliquem locum aput te inuenire indulgentiæ. Quisquis autem tibi enumerat vera merita sua, quid tibi enumerat nisi munera tua? O si cognoscerent se omnes, & qui gloriatur in Domino gloriaretur: MarginaliaAugust. libr. Confession. 9. Woe bee to the lyfe of men, be they neuer so holy, if thou shalt examine them, settyng thy mercy asyde. Because thou doest not exactly examine the faultes of men, therfore we haue a vehement hope & trust to finde some place of mercy with thee. And who soeuer recounteth vnto the hys merytes, what other thyng doth he recounte, but thy benefites? O would God al men would see & know them selues and that hee whiche glorieth, would glorie in the Lord. Agayne, in the fyrst booke hee sayeth thus vnto God: Nunquid inops es & gaudes lucris? Nunqud auarus & vsuras exigis? Superogatur tibi vt debeas? & quis habet quicquam non tuum? Reddis debita nulli debens, donas debita nihil perdens. MarginaliaConfes. lib. 1. Doth any man gyue that he oweth not vnto the, that thou shouldest be in his debte? and hath any man ought that is not thine? Thou rendrest debte, and yet owest to no man. Thou forgyuest debte, and yet loseste nothyng. And therfore his vsuall prayer was this: Domine da quod iubes, et iube quod vis. Lord geue that thou commaundest, and commaund what thou wilt.

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Also in the booke called, Manuale Augustini, or De contemplatione Christi, he sayth in this wyse: Tota spes mea est in morte Domini. Mors eius meritum meum, refugium meum, salus, vita, & resurrectio mea. Meritum meum miseratio Domini. Non sum meriti inops quamdiu ille miserationum Dominus nō defuerit. Et si misericordiæ Domini multæ multus ego sum in meritis. All my hope is in the Lordes death. His death is my merite, my refuge, my helth, and my resurrecion. My merite is the mercy of the lord. I am not without merite, so long as the lord of mercy shall continue. And if the mercies of the Lord be great and rich, then am I also great and rich in merites.

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MarginaliaGood workes how they be Gods and how they be ours. And to conclude, they be Christes owne merites and good workes (as saith S. Ambrose wel nigh euery where) that he worketh in vs, which he doth reward and crowne, and not ours, if one should loke narowly vpon the thyng, & speake properly. Howbeit, they yet neuerthelesse are oures by hym, for so much as hys mercifull bountie imputeth hys goods to be ours. So that in this, I wote not how other do meane, which lust to sel their merites vnto theyr neighbors, that happely haue skarce enough for themselues: but I do wholy deme & beleue, accordyng as the scripture with these holy doctors, and such other, do teach, wishyng that men euer for good doyng, (should not so much (as the cōmon people doth) regard their merite or reward, for that is not the thyng that engendreth the loue of god in vs, MarginaliaTo walke with god after a seruile fashion is to worke for merite but rather maketh men to honour God in a seruile fashion, and for þe loue of themselues, in doyng workes for loue of reward, or for dread of payne, more then because it so pleaseth God, & lyketh him: where as if we regarded first (yea & altogether) that it is our duety to do wel (which is the keping of hys cōmaundements) and that so we should content his pleasure,

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reward
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