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1192 [1191]

K. Henry. 8. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Martyrs.

goyng some whether this morning, for that they might wel perceiue by my foule shoes and dirty hosen, that I had trauailed with him the most part of this night. I aunswered playnly that I lay at Alborne Hall with sir Fitziames and that I had good witnes therof there. They asked me where I was at Euensong. I told them at Friswides, and that I saw first master Commissary, and thē master D. London come thether at that tyme vnto M. Deane of Frisewides, and that I saw them talking together in þe Church there. D. London and the Deane threatned me, that if I would not tell the truth where I had done him, or whether he was gone, I should surely be sent vnto the Tower of London, and there be racked, and put into little ease. But M. Commissary prayed me with gentle wordes to tell him where he was, that he might haue him agayne, & he would be my very great friend & deliuer me out of trouble straightway. I told him I could not tell where he was nor whether he was become. Thus did they occupy and tosse me almost two houres in the chappell, sometymes with threatninges and foule wordes, and then with fayre wordes and faire promises flatteryng me. Then was he that brought M. Garret vnto my chamber, brought before me and caused to declare what M. Garret sayd vnto me at hys commyng to my chamber, but I said plainly I heard him say no such thing for I thought my nay to be as good as his yea, seing it was to rid and deliuer my godly brother out of trouble and perill of his lyfe.

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At the last, when they could get nothyng of me wherby to hurt or accuse any man, or to know any thing of þt which they sought, they all 3. together brought me vp a long staires into a great chamber ouer M. Cōmissaries chamber, wherin stode a great paire of very high stockes. MarginaliaAnthonye Dalaber set in the stockes. Then M. Commissarie asked me for my purse and girdle, toke away my mony and my kniues, and then they put both my legs into the stockes, and so locked me fast in them: in which I sate, my feete being almost as high as my head, and so departed they (I thinke to their abominable masse) locking fast þe chamber dore, and leauing me alone. When all they were gone, then came vnto my remembrance the worthy forewarning and godly declaration of that most constant Martyr of god, M. Iohn Clarke, my father in Christ, who welnigh two yeares before that, whē I did earnestly desire him to graūt me to be his scholer, & that I might go with him cōtinually when & wheresoeuer he should teach or preach (þe which he did daily) said vnto me much after this sorte: MarginaliaThe exhortation of M. Clarke to Anthony Dalaber. Dalaber, you desire you wot not what, and that you are, I feare me, vnable to take vpon you. For thoughe now my preaching be swete and pleasaunt vnto you, because there is yet no persecution laid on you for it, yet the tyme will come, and that peraduenture shortly, if ye continue to liue godly therin, that God will lay on you the crosse of persecutiē to try you withall, whether you can as pure gold abide the fire, or as stubble and drosse be consumed therewith. For the holy Ghost plainly affirmeth by S. Paule 

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2 Timothy 3:12.

, quod omnes qui pie volunt viuere in Christo Iesu, persecutionem patientur. Marginalia2. Tim 3. Yea, you shall be called and iudged an heretike, you shall be abhorred of the world, your owne friendes and kinsfolke will forsake you, and also hate you, and you shall be cast into prison, and no man shall dare to helpe or comfort you, you shalbe accused and brought before the Bishops to your reproche and shame, to the great sorrow of all your faithful friendes and kinsfolke. MarginaliaThe crosse commonly followeth the Gospell. Then will ye wish ye had neuer knowen this doctrine. Then will ye curse Clarke, and wish that ye had neuer knowen him, because he hath brought you to all these troubles. Therfore rather then that ye should do this, leaue of from medling of this doctrine, and desire not to be & continue in my company.

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At which his wordes I was so grieued, that I fell downe on my knees at his feet, and with abuondance of teares and sighes euen from the bottome of my hart, I earnestly besought him, that for the tender mercy of god shewed vnto vs in our Lord Iesus Christ, he would not refuse me, but receiue me into his company, as I had desired, saying that I trusted verely, that he which had begon this in me, woulde not forsake me, but geue me grace to continue therein vnto the ende. When he heard me say so, he came to me, and tooke me vp in his armes, kissed me, the teares trickling downe from his eyes, and said vnto me: The Lord almighty graūt you so to do, and from henceforth for euer take me for your father, and I will take you for my sonne in Christ. Nowe were there at that time in Oxford, diuers Graduates and Scholers of sundry Colleges and Halles, whom God had called to the knowledge of his holy word, which all resorted vnto M. Clarkes disputations and lectures in diuinitie at all times as they might: and when they might not come cōueniently, I was by M. Clarke appointed to resorte vnto euery of them wekely, and to know what doubtes they had in any place of the scriptures, that by me frō him they might haue the true vnderstanding of the same: which exercise did me most good and profite, to the vnderstanding of the holy Scriptures, which I most desired.

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This foresaid forewarning and godly declaration (I say) of this most godly martir of God M. Clarke, cōming to my remembrance, MarginaliaDalaber armed wiht patience and constancie. caused me with depe sighes to cry vnto God from my hart to assist me with his holy spirite, that I might be able paciently and quietly to beare & suffer whatsoeuer it should please him of his fatherly loue to lay on me, to his glory and the comfort of my dearely beloued brethren, whom I thought now to be in great feare and anguish, lest I would be an accuser of them all, for vnto me they all were well known: and all their doings in that matter. But God be blessed, I was fully bēt neuer to accuse any of thē, what soeuer should happen of me. Before dinner M. Cotisforde MarginaliaD. Cotisford persecuter of Dalaber and Garret. came vp to me and requested me earnestly to tell him where maister Garret was, and if I would so do, he promised me straightwaies to deliuer me out of prison. But I told him I could not tell where he was: no more in deede I could. Then he departed to dinner, asking me if I woulde eate any meate, and I tolde him, yea right gladly. He said he would sende me some. When he was gone, his seruauntes asked me diuers questions, which I doe not now remember, and some of them spake me faire, and some threatened me, calling me hereticke, and so departed, locking the dore fast vpon me.

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Thus farre Anthony Dalaber hath prosecuted this story, who before the finishing, departed the yeare, 1562. in the Dioces of Salisbury: the residue therof as we could gather it of auncient and credible persons, so haue we added here vnto the same.

MarginaliaTho. Garret apprehended and brought to Oxford. After this, Garret was apprehended or taken by maister Cole the Proctor or his men, going Westward, at a place called Hinksey 

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Garret was in fact apprehended on 29 February 1528 at Bedminster, on the outskirts of Bristol.

a litle beyond Oxford, and so beyng brought backe agayne, was committed to Ward, that done, he was conuented before the Commissary, MarginaliaD. Lōdon, & D. Higdon persecuters of Garret. Doctour London and Doctour Higdon Deane of Friswides (now called Christes Colledge) into S. Maries Church, where they sitting in iudgement, conuicted him accordyng to their law as an hereticke (as they sayd) MarginaliaGarret and Dalaber bare fagottes in Oxford, and afterward compelled him to carie a Faggot in open Procession from Saint Maries Churche to Friswides, and Dalaber likewise with him, Garret hauing his red hoode on his shoulders like a maister of Arte. After that, they were sent to Osney, there to be kept in prison till farther order was taken.

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There were suspected beside, a great number to be infected with heresie, as they called it, for hauing suche bookes of Gods truth, as Garret sold vnto them, as M. Clarke 

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The source for this list of names is not clear, although most of them are also names which appear in Dalaber's unabridged account. Foxe's statement that 'diuers other there were, whose names I cannot remember', suggests either that he is here reproducing another document, or, possibly, that he is drawing on his own first-hand knowledge of Oxford heresy. Foxe first went up to Oxford in 1534.

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, whiche died in his chamber, and could not be suffered to receiue the Communion, beyng in prison, and saying these wordes: Crede, & manducasti. MarginaliaThe names of godly brethren at Oxford. Maister Somner, Maister Bettes, Tauerner the Musition, Radley, with other of Friswides Colledge, of Corpus Christi Colledge, as Vdall and Diet, with other of Magdalene Colledge one Eeden, with other of Glocester Colledge, and two blacke Monkes, one of S. Austines of Canterbury named Langporte, the other of S. Edmōdes bury Monke, named Ioh. Salisbury, two white Mōkes of Barnard Colledge, two Canons of S. Maries Colledge, MarginaliaRob. Ferrat Byshop of S Dauids. one of them named Robert Ferrar afterward bishop of S. Dauies, and burned in Queene Maries tyme. These two Canons, because they had no place in the Vniuersitie with the other, they went on the contrary side of the Procession bare headed, and a Bedell before them, to bee knowen from the other. Diuers other there were, whose names I cannot remember, which were forced and constrained to forsake their Colledges, and sought their frendes. Agaynst the Procession time, there was a great fire made vppon the top of Carfaxe, whereinto all such as were in the sayd Procession, either conuict or suspect of heresie, were commaunded, in token of repentaunce and renouncing of their errours, euery man to cast a booke into the fire as they passed by.

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After this, Master Garret flying from place to place 

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Which is to say, Foxe knew nothing of Garret's activities between 1528 and 1540. On these, see ODNB.

, escaped their tiranny vntill this present time, that he was agayne apprehended & burned wt D. Barnes. MarginaliaW. Hierome burned in Smithfield. With whome also W. Hierome sometyme vicar of Stepney, was likewise drawn into Smithfield, and there together with them, constantly endured martirdome in the fire.

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Now let vs adde also to these, the story of Hierome.

The lyfe and story of W. Hierome Vicar of Stepney and Martyr of Christ. 
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The source for the short account of William Jerome, which only appears in 1570 and subsequent editions, is unclear. Almost all of information here can be substantiated from three documents in the State Papers (National Archives, SP 1 / 158 fos. 50-2, 120, 124-5 (LP XV 354.1, 411.2, 414), but these do not appear to be Foxe's sources, not least because none of them refer to Dr. Wilson's role, which is otherwise unrecorded. The account appears to be based entirely on a summary of Jerome's recantation sermon, given at St. Mary Spital on 29 March 1540, the Monday of Easter week.

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MarginaliaThe story of William Hierome. THe third companion which suffered with Barnes and Garret, was Williā Hierome Vicar of Stepney. This

Hierome
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