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1195 [1194]

K. Hen. 8. Barnes, Garret, and Hierome, Marytrs.

and that there is none other satisfaction vnto the Father, but this his death and passion only: and that no woorke of man did deserue any thyng of God, but onely his passion, as touchyng our iustification. MarginaliaAll mens workes vnperfite. For I know the best worke that euer I dyd, is vnpure and vnperfit. And with this he cast abroad his handes, and desired God to forgiue him his trespasses. For although perchaunce (sayd hee) you knowe nothyng by me, yet do I confesse that my thoughts and cogitations be innumerable: Wherfore I besech the O Lord not to enter into iudgement with me, accordyng the saying of the Prophet Dauid: Non intres in iudicium cum seruo tuo domine. i. 

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Psalm 143:2.

MarginaliaPsal. 143. Enter not into iudgement with thy seruaunt O Lord?. And in an other place: Si iniquitates obseruaueris domine quis sustinebit? 
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Psalm 130:3.

MarginaliaPsal. 130. Lorde, if thou straitely marke our iniquities, who is able to abyde thy iudgement? Wherfore I trust in no good woorke that euer I dyd, but onelye in the death of Christe. I do not doubt, but through him to inherite the kingdome of heauen. MarginaliaGood workes are to be done. Take me not here that I speake agaynst good woorkes for they are to bee done, and verely they that do them not, shall neuer come in the kingdome of God. We must do them, because they are commaūded vs of God to shewe and set forth our profession, not to deserue or merite, for that is onely the death of Christ.

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I beleue that there is a holy Church, & a companie of all them that professe Christ: and that al that haue suffered and confessed hys name, be Saintes, and that all they do prayse and laude God in heauen, more then I, or any mans tongue can expresse, and that alwayes I haue spoken reuerently, & praysed them as much as scripture willed me to doe And that our Lady (I say) was a Virgine immaculate and vndefiled and that she is þe most purest virgine that euer God created and a vessel elect of God of whom Christ should be borne. Then sayd M Shiriffe, you haue sayd well of her before. MarginaliaD. Barnes obedient to magistrates. And being afrayde that M. Shriffe hadde bene or should be agreeued with any thyng that he should say, hee sayd: Maister Shriffe, if I speake any thyng that you wil me not, do no more but becken me with your hande, and I wyll strayght waye holde my peace, for I will not be disobedient in any thyng, but wyll obey.

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MarginaliaPraying to Saintes. Then there was one that asked hym hys opiniō of praying to Saintes, Then sayd he: Now of Saintes you shall here my opinion. I haue sayd before somwhat I thinke of them, how that I beleue they are in heauen with God, and that they are worthy of al the honour that Scripture willeth them to haue. But I say thorough out all Scripture we are not commaunded to pray to any Saintes. Therfore I can not nor will not preach to you that Saintes ought to be prayed vnto: for then should I preach vnto you a doctrine of myne owne head. Notwithstandyng whether they pray for vs or no, that I referre to God. And if Saintes do pray for vs, then I trust to pray for you with in this halfe houre maister shriffe, and for euery Christian man lyuyng in the fayth of Christ and dying in the same as a saint. Wherfore if the dead may pray for the quick:, I will surely pray for you.

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Well, haue ye any thyng more to say? Then spake hee to maister Shriffe and sayd, haue ye any Articles agaynst me for the which I am condemned? And the Shriffe aunswered, no. MarginaliaNo cause shewed why D. Barnes dyed. Then sayd he, is there here any man els that knoweth wherfore I dye, or that by my preachyng hath taken any errour? Let them now speake and I will make them aunswere. And no man aunswered. Then sayd he, well I am condemned by the lawe to dye, and as I vnderstand, by an Acte of Parliament, but wherfore, I cānot tell, but belyke for herisie, for we are lyke to burne. MarginaliaD. Barnes praying for his enemies. But they þt haue bene þe occasion of it, I pray God forgeue them, as I would be forgiuen my selfe. And D. Steuen 

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This barbed word of 'forgiveness' to Gardiner appears to have laid the foundation of the claim that Gardiner was the mastermind behind the executions.

Byshop of Wynchester þt now is, if hee haue sought or wrought this my death either by worde or dede, I pray God forgiue hym as hartely, as freely, as charitably, and without faynyng, as euer Christ forgaue them that put him to death.

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And if any of the Councell, or any other haue sought or wrought it thorough malice or ignoraunce, I pray God forgiue their ignoraunce and illuminate their eyes that they may see and aske mercy for it. MarginaliaD. Barnes prayeth for the kyng. I beseche you all to pray for the kynges grace, as I haue done euer since I was in prison, and do nowe, that God may geue hym prosperitie, and that he may long raigne among you, and after hym that godly Prince Edward may so raigne, that he may finish those thynges that his father hath begon. I haue bene reported a preacher of sedition and disobedience vnto the kynges maiestie, but heare I say to you, that you all are bound by the commaundement of God to obey your Prince with all humilitie, and with all your hart, yea not so muche as in a looke to shewe your selues disobedient vnto hym, and that not onely for feare of the sword, but also for conscience sake before God. Yea and I say further, if the kyng should cōmaunde you any thyng agaynst Gods lawe, if it bee in your power to resiste hym, yet may you not do it.

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MarginaliaFiue requestes of D. Barnes to the kynge. Then spake he to the Shriffe and sayd, maister Shriffe I require you on Gods behalfe, to haue me commended vnto the kynges grace, and to shew hym that I require of his grace these fiue requestes: MarginaliaThe first request. First that where hys grace hath receiued into his handes, all the goods and substance of the Abbeys. Then the Shriffe desired hym to stoppe there. Hee aunswered, Maister Shriffe I warrant you I wil speake no harme, for I know it is well done that all such superstition be cleane taken away, and the kynges grace hath well done in takyng it away. MarginaliaThe king of England made a whole king by poore preachers. But hys grace is made a whole kyng, & obeyed in hys Realme as a kynge (whiche neyther his father nor graundfather, neither his aūceters þt raigned before him euer had) and that thorough the preachyng of vs and such other wretches as we are, whiche alwayes haue applied our whole studies, and giuen our selues for the settyng forth of the same, and this is now our reward. Well it maketh no mateer. Now hee raigneth among you: I pray God long may he liue and reigne among you. Would to god it might please his grace to bestow the sayde goods or some of them, to the comfort of his poore subiectes, which surely haue great nede of them.

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MarginaliaThe 2. request of D. Barnes to the king. The second that I desire his grace, is, that he will see that matrimonie be hadde in more reuerence then it is, and that men for euery light cause inuented, cast not of their wiues and lyue in adultery and fornication, and that those that be not maried should not abominablye lyue in whoredome, folowyng the filthy lustes of the fleshe.

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MarginaliaThe 3. request. The third, that the abominable swearers may be punished and straitly looked vpō: for the vengeance of God will come on them for their mischieuous othes. Then desired he master Pope to haue him commended to M. Edgar and to desire him for the deare bloud of Iesu Christ, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes request to M. Edgar to leaue swearing. that he woulde leaue that abhominable swearyng which he vsed, for surely except he did forsake it, he woulde come to some mischeuous ende.

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MarginaliaThe. 4. request. The fourth, that his grace woulde set forth Christs true Religion, and seyng he hath begonne, that he would go forward and make an end, for many thinges haue bene done, but much more is to do: and that it woulde please his grace to looke on Gods worde him selfe, for it hath ben obscured with many traditions inuented of our owne braynes. Now sayd he, how many petitions haue I spoken of? And þe people sayd foure. Well sayd hee: euen these foure be sufficient, which I desire you: that the kynges grace may be certified of, and say that I most humbly desire hym to loke earnestly vpon them: and that his grace take heede that hee be not deceiued with false preachers and teachers and euill Councell for Christ sayth that suche false Prophetes shall come in Lambes skynnes.

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Then desired he all men to forgeue him, and if hee hadde sayd any euill at any time vnaduisedly, whereby he had offended any man, or giuen any occasion of euill, that they woulde forgiue it him, and amende that euyll they tooke of hym, and to beare hym witnes, MarginaliaDoct. Barnes cleareth himselfe of all heresie. that he detested and abhorred all euyll opinions and doctrines agaynst the woord of God, and that he dyed in the fayth of Iesu Christe, by whō he doubted not, but to be saued. And with those wordes he desyred them all to pray for him, and then hee turned him about, and put of his clothes, makyng him ready to the fire, paciently there to take his death.

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MarginaliaThe protestation and confession of Hierome & Garret. The like 

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No independent witness to Garret and Jerome's confessions from the stake survives. They were first introduced in 1570 and retained unaltered thereafter. It is possible that one of the various manuscript versions of Barnes' Protestation also included these texts.

cōfessiō also made Hierome & Garret, professing in lyke maner their beliefe, reciting all the articles of þe Christian fayth, brieflye declaryng their myndes vpon euery article, as the tyme woulde suffer: whereby the people myght vnderstande that there was no cause nor errour in their fayth, wherfore iustly they ought to be condemned: Protestyng moreouer that they denyed nothyng that was eyther in the old or new Testament, set foorth by theyr soueraigne Lord the king: whom they prayed the Lord long to cōtinue amongest thē, with his most deare sonne Prince Edward. Which done Hierome added this exhortation in fewe wordes folowyng.

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MarginaliaThe exhortation of Hierome to the people. I say vnto you good brethren, that God hath bought vs all with no small price, neither with golde nor syluer, or other such thynges of small value, but with his most precious bloud. Be not vnthankfull therfore to him agayne, but do as much as to Christian men belongeth, to fulfill his cōmaundementes, that is, loue your brethren. Loue hurteth no man, loue fulfilleth al thinges. Yf God haue sent thee plēty, helpe thy neighbour that hath neede. Geue hym good councell. Yf he lacke, consider if thou were in necessitie thou wouldest gladly be refreshed. And agayne beare your crosse with Christ. Consider what reproofe, sclaunder, and reproche he suffered of his enemies, and how paciently he suffered all thynges. Consider that all that Christ did, was of his mere goodnesse, and not of our deseruyng. For if we coulde merite our owne saluation, Christ would not haue

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died
MMM.ij.
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