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1219 [1218]

K. Henry. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, with others.

marueiled at it, and sayd playnly that the Scripture knew no such terme of transubstantiation. MarginaliaDamlip threatned by the byshops. Then began the other Byshops to threaten him, shortly to confute him with there accustomed argument, I meane fire and Fagot, if he should still stand to the defence of that he had spoken. Wherunto he constauntly aunswered that he would the next day deliuer vnto them fully so much in writyng as he had sayd: whereto also he would stand, and so was dismissed.

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MarginaliaDamlip secretlye warned to voide The next day at the houre appointed to appeare, when they looked surely to haue apprehended him, in the meane season he had secret intimation from the Byshop of Canterbury, that if he did any more personally appeare, he should be committed vnto Warde, not like to escape cruell death.

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Wherupon he (playing in deede then somewhat old Adams part, for such is man, left in his owne handes) had hym commended vnto them and sent them foure sheetes of paper learnedly written in the Latin toung, conteinyng his fayth with his argumentes, conferences, of the Scriptures, and allegations of the Doctours, by a messenger or frend of his. Which done, he hauyng a little money giuē hym in his purse by hys frendes, stepped aside and went to the Westcountrey, and there kept all the tyme, while great trouble kyndled agaynst Gods people in Calyce, vppon the same, as ye shall , 

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In the passages above, Foxe is presenting a simplified view of a complex series of events. John Butler, Cranmer's commissary, attempted to rescue Damplip by having summoned back to Lambeth for examination by Cranmer. In the meantime, Thomas Cromwell weighed in on Damplip's side. Dove was grilled thoroughly about his actions and Cromwell sent Lisle a blistering reprimand. However, the accusations of sacramentarian heresy clearly alarmed the king. Cromwell had to open an investigation of sacramentarians in Calais and Lisle was able to force a second hearing for Damplip. It was this second hearing that Damplip fled. (For the outline of these events see A. J. Slavin, 'Cromwell, Cranmer and Lord Lisle, a study in the politics of reform', Albion 9 [1977], pp. 325-33 and Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], pp. 218-19).

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theLord permytting.

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After his departure, the kynges Maiestie was aduertised that there was great dissention and diuersitie of pernicious opinions in his sayd towne of Calyce, greatly tendyng to the daunger of the same. Wherupō, duryng yet the dayes of the Lord Cromwel, MarginaliaD. Champion and M. Garret, 

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I.e., the martyr Thomas Garrett. This, however, was not a commission; Champion and Garrett were sent to preach in Calais and, in fact, Garrett was appointed to the living of St. Peter's just outside the town.

sent to preach at Calyce. were sent ouer Doctour Champion Doctor of Diuinitie, and M. and learned men, to preache and instruct the people and to confute all pernitious errours, who in effect preached and mainteined the same true doctrine which Adam Damlyp had before set forth, and by reason therof, they left the Towne at their departure very quyet, and greatly purged of the sclaunder that had runne on it.

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After the departure of the sayd Champion and Garret, MarginaliaSyr W. Smith Curate, and a zelous preacher at Calyce. one Syr William Smith Curate of our Lady Parishe in Calyce, a man very zelous, though but meanely learned, dyd begyn to preache and earnestly to inuey agaynst Papistriy & wilfull ignoraunce: exhortyng men obediently to receaue the word, and no longer to cōtemne the same, lest Gods heauy plagues and wrath should fall vpō them, which alwayes foloweth the contempt of his holy worde.

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Which Syr Williā Smith, for that sometyme he would be very feruent and zelous, sharply inueying agaynst the despisers of the word, was moued by some of the Counsell there, who would seeme to fauour Gods worde, that hee should not be so earnest agaynst them that yet could not away with the same, willyng him to beare with such, for by bearyng with them they might happe to be won.

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Well, well, sayd the same Smith (openly in the Pulpit one day as he preached) some men say I am to earnest, and will me to beare with such as continue open enemyes agaynst Christes holy Gospell, and refuse, nay forbyd that any should read the Bible or holy Scripture within their house: but let all such take heede, for before God, I feare that God for their contemnyng of his word, will not long beare with them, but make them in such case as some of thē shall not haue a head left them vpō their shoulders to beare vp their cap withall: which also 

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This account of Sir Nicholas Carew's repentance at his death was dropped from the second edition; almost certainly because Foxe learned that it was demonstrably untrue. Carew apparently died a staunch Catholic. Foxe took this account, word-for-word, from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke, (London, 1550), STC 12734a, fo.233r.

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after came to passe.

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This Smith continued in the diligent bestowyng of his talent there, till shortly after the deuill got such hold in the hartes of a number of Gods enemyes, that he with diuers other godly men were called ouer into England, and charged with erroneous opinions worthy of great punishment, as hereafter more at large shall appeare.

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First þe Lord Lisle þe kinges deputy there, whom we shewed to be the maintainer of Damlyp MarginaliaThe L. Lisle base sonne to K. Edward the fourth. (all be it he were hymselfe of a most gentle nature and of right noble bloud, the base sonne of that noble Prince Kyng Edward the fourth) being fiercely set on, and incessauntly entised by the wicked Lady Honor his wife, who was an vtter enemy to Gods honour, and in idolatry, hipocrisie, and pride incomparably euill, she beyng dayly and hourely thereunto incited and prouoked by MarginaliaSyr Thomas Palmer. Syr Thomas Palmer Knight, and MarginaliaM. Rookwoode. Iohn Rookwoode Esquyre, two enemies to Gods word, begynnyng now to florish at Calyce 

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Actually Lord Lisle was a religious conservative and needed no goading from his wife or anyone else to move against Damplip, Broke, Butler and the others.

: these I say, with certaine other of the Counsell of the sayd Towne of Calyce, to the number of vij. moe beside themselues, seekyng occasion or rather a quarell, where no iust cause was geuen, MarginaliaThe Councell of Calice letters against the Protestātes. begā to write very heynous letters and greuous complaintes vnto the Lordes of the priuy Counsell, agaynst diuers of the Towne of Calyce, affirmyng that they were horribly infected with heresies and pernitious opinions: As first the foresaid Adā Dālip, who though he were for a time escaped their handes, yet stacke still in their remembraunce from tyme to tyme, vntill at last the innocent man was cruelly put to death as a traytour, as herafter shall appeare.

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Also besides this Damlip, they complayned of Thomas Broke, Rafe Hare, likewise of syr Iohn Butler then Commissarie, and syr W. Smith, Iames Cocke, alias Coppen de Hane, Iames Barber & other, and the names of them all sent ouer. Of the which persons, first the sayde Thomas Broke, and Rafe Hare, Coppen de Hane, and Iames Barber were apprehended and sent ouer, and committed to prison in Westminster gate, and then commaunded to appeare before the Archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Winchester, the byshop of Chichester, and ten other appointed by the kynges Maiesties commission, for the examination of them. 

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This was in May 1539.

And their accusers also were sent ouer wyth letters from the Counsell there, vnto his priuie Councell here, in the furtheraunce of their malicious sutes agaynst those honest men, wyth certaine speciall letters directed vnto the Lord Fitzwilliams then Earle of Southhampton, & great Admirall of Englād, to the L. Sandes, Lord Chamberlayne of the Houshold, likewise also to syr William Kingstone knight, Comptroller of the Houshold, & to D. Sampson, then B. of Chichester, and other tēding all to one effect, that is to say, to the vtter destructiō of these godly men, if God after his wonted maner) had not mightely preserued them, and, as it were, ouershadowed them with the winges of his mercy.

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MarginaliaThe trouble of Rafe Hare souldiour of Calyce. That the same may the better appeare, you shall vnderstand that first Rafe Hare, a man rude and so vnlearned, that scarce he could read yet through Gods grace, was very zealous, 

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Ralph Hare was a soldier in the Calais garrison.

and therwith lead so godly and temperate a life, as not one of hys enemyes coulde accuse or blame the same his sober lyfe and conuersation. MarginaliaRafe Hare charged. Thys Rafe Hare was charged to be one, that had spoken agaynst auricular confession, agaynst holy bread and holy water, yea and beside that, he was one which would not lightly sweare an oth, nor vse almost anye maner of pastime, nor good fellowship, as they terme it, but was alwayes in a corner by himselfe, lookyng on his booke. The poore simple man being charged by the Cōmissioners, that he was a naughty man and erroneous, and that he could not be otherwise, comming out of a towne so infected with pernicious errours & sectes as that was, was willed by them to take good heede to himselfe, least through obstinacie he turned his erroneous opinions to playne heresie: for an errour defended, is heresie.

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MarginaliaThe aunswere of Rafe Hare. My good Lordes sayd the poore man, I take God to recorde, I woulde not willyngly mayntayne an errour or heresie, wherefore I beseeche you let my accusers come face to face before me. For if they charge me wyth that which I haue spoken, I will neuer denie it. Moreouer, if it be truth, I will stand vnto it, and otherwise if it be an errour, I will with all my hart vtterly forsake it, I meane if it be agaynst Gods holy word. For the Lord is my witnes, I seeke, & dayly pray to God, that I may know the truth, & flee from all errours, and I trust the Lord will saue me & preserue me from them.

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Aha, quoth the byshop of Winchester, do you not heare what he saith my Lord? I perceiue now thou art a naughty fellow. Alas my Lord, said Rafe Hare, what euill sayd I? MarginaliaWinchesters cauillation about the Lord, and our Lorde. Mary Syr, you sayd, the Lord, the Lord, and that is, Symbolum hœreticorum, sayd Winchester. What is that my Lord, for Gods sake tell me, sayde Hare? Thou art nought, thou art nought sayd he. At which wordes þe simple man began to tremble, and seemed much dismayde and driuen into a greater agony and feare. Which thing Winchester wel perceiuing, said vnto him: Rafe Hare, Rafe Hare, by my trouth I pitie thee much. For in good faith I thinke thee to be a good simple man, & of thy selfe wouldest meane wel enough, but that thou hast had shrewd and subtile schoolemaisters, that haue seduced thee good poore simple soule, and therfore I pitie thee,: and it were in deede pitie that thou shouldest be burnt, for thou art a good fellow, a talle man, and hast serued þe king right well in his warres. 

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Ralph Hare was a soldier in the Calais garrison.

I haue heard thee well commēded, & thou art yet able to do the kyng as good seruice as euer thou was, and we all will be a meane to his grace to be good and gracious Lord vnto thee, if thou wilt take pitie of thy selfe, & leaue thy errours. For I dare say for vs all, that be Commissioners, that we would be loth that thou should be cast away. For alas poore simple man, we perceiue thou hast bene seduced (I say) by others.

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How sayest thou therefore? thou knowest my Lord of Canterburies grace here is a good gentle Lord, and would be lothe thou should be cast away. Tel me, canst thou be cōtent to submit thy selfe vnto him, and to stand vnto such order, as he and we shal take in this matter? How sayest thou man? speake. The poore man therwith falling vpon hys knees, and sheeding teares, aunswered, speaking to the Archbyshop of Canterbury in this wise: My good lord, for Christes sake be good vnto me, and I referre my selfe vnto your graces order, do with me what you please.

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