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1220 [1219]

K. Hen. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, with others.

The Byshop of Canterbury, consideryng what daunger he was ready to fall in, and pitying the same (though the simplicitie of the man was so great, that he perceiued it not) sayd MarginaliaThe wordes of the Archb. of Cant. to Hare. nay Rafe Hare, stand vp, and aduise thy selfe, and commit not thy selfe to me, for I am but one man, and in Commission but as the other are, so that it lyeth in me to do nothyng. But if thou do commit thy selfe vnto all, then thou committest thy selfe vnto the law, and the law is ordayned to do euery man right. Go to Raphe Hare sayd Winchester, submit thy selfe to my Lord and vs: it is best for thee to do so. Whereupon he fell vpon his knees agayne, and sayd: My Lordes and maisters all, I submitte my selfe wholy vnto you. And therewithall a booke was holden him, and an othe geuen him to be obedient vnto them, and to all Ecclesiasticall lawes: and straightway he was enioyned to abiure, MarginaliaPennance inioyned to Rafe Hare. and to beare a Faggot three seuerell dayes, & moreouer the poore man lost the liuyng that he had at Calyce.

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This simple man hearing his penaunce, piteously lamented, and earnestly at the first denied to stand thereunto, with pitious exclamation, saying: O my Lord of Winchester, my Lord of Winchester, haue you made me a logge ready to be layd vppon the fire when soeuer any wicked man falsly of malice by prouocation of the deuill, shall lay any small trifle to my charge? Or shall I be thus handled, nothyng proued to my face against me? Alas I haue alwayes hated errours and heresies. Content thy selfe Hare: there is now no remedy, thou must either do thy penaunce, or be burnt, sayd the Commissioners. Thus haue you heard how Rafe Hare did speede.

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MarginaliaThe examinatiō and trouble of T. Broke. Then was Thomas Broke called for, agaynst whom it was obiected by some of the Counsels letters of Calyce, that he was a seditious fellow. MarginaliaAccusers of T. Broke. Among these accusers besides the rest, was one Richard Long, an other Fraunces Hastyngs, men of armes, who charged the forenamed Thomas Broke, and one Geffray Loueday Esquire, for staying and mainteinyng the foresayd Adam Damlyp at Calyce: as who had promised vnto him a stipend to preache such heresies and pernicious opinions, as afterward hee taught there: and that these two dayly gathered many seuerall summes of money, for the entertainement of the sayd Adam. MarginaliaFalse accusation. Howbeit the foresaid Hastinges fayled in the proofe therof. For Loueday proued that he was viij. dayes before Damlyps commyng to Calyce, and duryng xiiij. dayes continually after he began to to preach, abidyng at Paris, there occupyed about necessarye affaires of Charles Duke of Southfolke. And Broke duryng the sayd tyme was at London dayly attendant in the Parliament house, whereof he had enough to beare witnes, against that vntrue surmise.

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MarginaliaThree other accusers agaynst T. Broke, and Geffrey Loueday. After that, came three at once agaynst the sayd Broke, well armed as they thought, who had not onely consulted together before of the matter, and put it in writyng at Calyce, beside their conference and talke by the way keepyng company from thence hether, but also had obtained from the Lord Deputie and others of the Counsel, special letters as is aforesayd: and among other, one letter vnto þe Bishop of Chichester, to the earnest and speedy furtheraūce of the aduauncement of their accusations agaynst Brooke.

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MarginaliaPayton the first accuser. The first of these three was a young Gentleman lately brought vp vnder the sayd Brooke in the office of custome, whose name was Edmund Payton 

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The following comments on Peyton's motives were dropped from the second edition of the A&M; cf. 1563, p. pp. 663-4. During Broke's disgrace and imprisonment, Peyton temporarily succeeded him in his office as a customs deputy at Calais.

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MarginaliaR. Poole the second accuser. The other was one Robert Poole, a man (as it was commonly reported) both base borne, and also such a one as in his youth for murtheryng a man with a clubbe in Bow lane in London, was fayne by obtainyng the kynges pardon, to saue his necke. 

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The following comment on Poole's ingratitude was dropped from the second edition of the A&M; cf. 1563, p. 664.

MarginaliaTh. Boyse the thyrd accuser. The thyrd was one Tho. Boyse, who shewyng more honesty then the rest, affirmed not that he himselfe heard the sayd Broke speake any thyng of that whiche was obiected agaynst him, but iustified that either of the other two had stedfastly affirmed to him, that Broke had spoken vnto thē those thynges here vnder obiected agaynst him.

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MarginaliaThe deposition of the first witnes agaynst T. Broke. The young man first obiected agaynst the sayd Broke, that he should say that the thyng which the Priest vseth to hold vp ouer his head at Masse, is not the naturall body of Iesu Christ: for if that were so, who so would, might haue their belly full of Gods, their guttes full of Gods, & he that had lately receiued the Sacramēt before he went to the sea, might happely vomet God vp agayne on shypboorde.

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And thus much he brought ouer in writyng with him from Calyce and added thereto, as it should seeme, to exasperate the Commissioners and the rest of the Clergy agaynst him, certeine other heynous wordes spoken agaynst Byshops and Priestes. Which wordes the sayd Broke there denyed, confessyng neuerthelesse that certaine priuate talke he had with hym touchyng the Sacrament, wherein he shewed to the young man the right vse of the same, concludyng, that albeit with our mouthes we receiued very materiall bread and wine, yet by fayth, all Christian men do MarginaliaThe priuate talke of T. Broke and Payton, touching the Sacrament.receiue, eate, and drinke, to their great comfort and benefite, the very naturall body and bloud of Christ, which was both borne of the virgine Mary, and suffred death on the Crosse for the remission of their sinnes: which most holy Sacrament, who so came vnworthely vnto, the same was so farre from the eating of Christes body and bloude, that all such (without harty repentaunce) do eate their owne damnation. And to conclude with him in that priuate talke he tolde hym that if the grosse and vnlearned errour of trāsubstantiation, were in deede matter of truth and sincere doctrine, then not onely this should follow of it, that euery man who would, might haue euerlasting life (for they might when they would receiue the outwarde Sacrament, seene wyth our eyes, which the Priestes call Christes naturall body, and who so eateth Christes body, and drinketh hys bloud, hath euerlasting lyfe, sayth Christ) but also there should great absurdities follow therby, as when a mā hapneth to go to the sea, hauing lately receiued the sacrament, he should put it ouer boorde, or do it on the hatches, & therfore exhorted the sayd Payton to leaue that grosse errour.

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MarginaliaPooles acusation agaynst Brooke. The second accuser was Poole, who obiected agaynst him þt about two yeares past, he hymselfe dyning with the sayd Brooke, with xv. or xvi. other honest men, heard hym thus say at the table, that that thyng which the Priestes vse to hold vp ouer their heades, was not the very body and bloud of Christ, but a sacrament to put vs in remembraūce therof. Vnto whose obiections the sayde Broke aunswered, that a man in myrth myght well enough with charitie beshrewe such a gest, as when he had dyned wyth a man, could so long after remember to say hym such a grace: and required of Poole, of whence the rest of the gestes were. He aunswered they were of the towne all. Then inferred he, that he was sure Poole could as well remember some of their names which then were present, as freshely to keepe in mynde (for so by oth vpon a booke he had affirmed) euery word of the whole matter which he obiected: but for that the matter was vtterly vntrue. Wherupon the sayde Brooke desired their honours to consider the slendernes of hys tale.

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To be short, he wyth the rest of his felowes, to witte, Rafe Hare, Coppen, and Iames the Barber, were for that tyme dismissed.

MarginaliaThe trouble and examination of Syr W. Smyth and Iohn Butler Commissarye. Duryng the tyme  

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In the spring of 1539, the earl of Hertford (later the duke of Somerset) had visited Calais to inspect the town's defences. Lisle and the conservatives in Calais seized the opportunity to denounce Butler and other evangelicals. The importance of this was that the conservative complaints reached Henry VIII without going through Cromwell. All that Cromwell could do was to launch another investigation, this time, however, it was not to be directed to Lambeth, where Cranmer could apply a coat of whitewash. In May 1539, Butler and the others were arrested, despite Cromwell's best efforts to stall the proceedings. In July Butler was replaced as commissary to Calais and banished from the town.

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while these foure were thus in examination at London, the other two, to witte, Syr William Smith preacher, and Iohn Butler, by commaundement were apprehended in Calyce, and bounde by suretie not to passe the gates of the towne of Calyce. MarginaliaThe accusers of I. Butler. In the which towne, the sayd Iohn Butler Commissary was accused by Rich. Thorpe and Iohn Ford, souldiers of Calyce, saying that he should say, that if the Sacrament of the aultar be fleshe, bloud, and bone, then there is good aqua vitæ at Iohn Spisers. MarginaliaAqua vitæ to digest the bloud and bones of the sacrament. Vpon which accusation the sayde Thorpe and Forde brought for recordes before the Counsayle of Calyce, Marraunt Haynes, Iohn Luckes, Harry Husson, and Harry Troste, all of the Parish of Oye beside Calyce. Wherupon shortly after, the sayde Iohn Butler and Sir William Smith were sent for, and by one Swallow a purseuant, which fet vp the other aforesayd, brought into England, vnto the house of the sayd Swallow, dwellyng by S. Iames, where the kynges maiestie lay at that tyme, and the next day being Thursday, after dinner, Butler and Smyth were brought to the starre chamber before the priuie Counsaile, where both sedition and heresie was obiected agaynst them: and after much talke, was sayde vnto them by the Lord Cromwell, that they shoulde make their purgation by the law: And frō thēce by the foresaid Swallow they were sent to the Fleete. 
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Butler was sent to the Fleet prison on 10 August 1539; thus his heresy examination, described in the next paragraph, took place on 11 August.

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The next day being Friday, after dinner, Butler and Smyth were sent for to come to Bathe place 

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i.e., Bath House, the London home of the Bishop of Bath and Wells. This was an informal examination of Butler on charges of heresy, by a commission appointed by Cromwell.

, where they were brought into þe chappell, there sitting D. Clarke Byshop of Bathe, Doct. Sampson, then Byshop of Chichester, Doctor Repse, then byshop of Norwiche, who was a Monke, beyng fast a sleepe. MarginaliaThe examination of Ioh. Butler. Thē was obiected vnto Butler with great reuerence, the obprobrious wordes spoken agaynst the blessed Sacrament, rehearsing (as is aforesaid) the articles. Butler required to haue them in writynge, and so would make aunswere in writyng. The which they would not graunt him: and vpon that aunswere he stoode. Then coler gathered in the Byshop of Chichester. The story were to long to wryte: yet part ye shall vnderstand.

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Chichester found great fault that Butler made not lowe cursie, being stubborne & arrogant, as he saide, and in fine founde fault with his shyrt. Then turning him about hee called to his brother Bannester being present (þt time dwelling in Pater noster Row) to make aunswere for the shirte He sayd, I can make aūswere for the shyrt. No good aunswere sayd Chichester. Forsoth, sayd he, þe shyrt is myne I lēt it him, because he brought none with him, for he was not

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