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1224 [1223]

K. Hen. 8. Persecution in Calyce. Adam Damlip, with others.

thyng that he had preached or taught before (yet for the receiuyng of the foresayd French crowne of Cardinall Pole, (as you heard before) he was condemned of treason, and in Calice cruelly put to death, being drawen, hanged, and quartered. 

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The fact that Damplip was executed for treason, instead of heresy, is revealing. It may have been an early indication that the 'Prebendaries' Plot would fail and also that Butler would be released. It is also ironic that Damplip was executed on the same charge that brought down Lord Lisle and Germain Gardiner (although Foxe is unclear about this, the men were executed for alledgedly conspiring with Reginold Pole. In reality, their executions were part of the factional struggles at Court in 1543-44.).

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The daye before his execution, came vnto hym one M. Mote, then person of our Lady Church of Calice, saying: your foure quarters shalbe hanged at foure partes of the towne. And where shal my head be, sayd Damlip? Vppon the Lanterne gate, said Mote. MarginaliaThe constant courage of Adam Damlip, not caring for his death Then Damlip answeared, Then I shal not nede to prouide for my buryall. At his death sir Rafe Ellerker knight, thē knight Marshal there, would not suffer the innocent and godly man, to declare eyther his fayth, or the cause he dyed for, but sayd to the executioner, dispatche the knaue, haue done. For sir Will. Mote appointed there to preach, declared to the people how he had ben a sower of seditious doctrine, and albeit he was for that pardoned by the general pardon, MarginaliaDamlip falsly accused of treason and innocentlye put to death. yet he was condemned for beyng a traytor against the king. To the which when Adā Damlip would haue replyed and purged him selfe, the foresayd sir Rafe Ellerker woulde not suffer hym to speake a word, but commaunded hym to be had away. And so most mekely, patiently, and ioyfully, the blessed & innocent martyr tooke his death, sir Rafe Ellerker saying, that he would not away before he saw the traytors hart out. MarginaliaAn example of Gods iust reuengment, But shortly after the saide sir Rafe Ellerker in a skirmish or roade betweene the French men and vs, at Bullayne was among other slaine. MarginaliaOf the death of Syr Rafe Ellerker, read in Halles Chronicles. Whose onely death sufficed not his enemies, but after they had stripped hym starke naked, they cut of his priuy members, and cut the hart out of his body, and so leaft hym a terrible example to all bloudy and mercylesse men. For no cause was knowen, why they shewed such indignation against the saide sir Rafe Ellerker, more then against the rest but that it is written: Faciens iustitias Dominus et iudicia omnibus iniuria pressis.

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MarginaliaAn other trouble of Iohn Butler, and Syr Daniell his Curate. As touching Ioh. Butler, and sir Daniel his Curate, imprisoned (as ye heard) the same day with Damlip, vpon Sonday next folowing they were committed to Io. Massy aforesaid, keeper of the Marshalsey, and his companye, and brought to the Marshalsey, where he continued & his Curate nine monethes & more. At last being sore laid vnto by sir George Gage, sir Iohn Baker, and sir Thomas Arūdell knightes, but especially by Steuen Gardiner bishop of Winchester, for the reteynyng of Adam Damlip, yet by frendes sollicityng the kinges highnes for him (namely Sir Leonard Musgraue, and his brother Baunster, who wer bound for his appearance in a thousand pound) he at length by great labour and long tyme was discharged, and at last by licence permitted to returne to Calice againe. 

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John Butler was released, made a royal chaplain and given additional benefice (he had already held two) in Calais in September 1543. He would become commissary of Calais again under Edward VI (Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], p. 315).

MarginaliaEx scripto testimonio Caletiensium. Ex scripto testimonio Caletiensium.

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MarginaliaW. Steuens an earnest Protestant falsly condemned for Poperye. Furthermore, as touching William Steuens aboue mētioned, who remained al this while prisoner in the Tower, the same was also cōdemned with Adam Damlip of treason, whiche was for note and crime of Poperie in lodgyng Adam Damlip, which came from Cardinal Poole the traitour in his house, at the Lorde Deputies commaundement. MarginaliaW. Steuens with the rest pardoned of the kyng. Notwithstanding the king afterward vnderstanding more of the sayd William Steuens, howe innocent he was from that crime being knowen to al men to be an earnest and zelous Protestant, gaue hym his pardon, and sent hym home agayne to Calice, and so likewise all the other. xiij. aboue mentioned.

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The story of a poore labouryng man in Calice.

MarginaliaA poore man burned at Calice for the right fayth of the Sacrament. BY the credible information & writyng of the sayde Calice men, which were then in trouble, it is reported of a certaine poore laboring man of Calice, who after the preaching of Adam Damlip, being in certaine company, sayd, that he would neuer beleue, that a priest could make the Lords body at his pleasure. Wherupon he was then accused, and also condemned by one Haruey Commissary there. Which Haruey in tyme of his iudgement inueyng against hym with opprobrious words, sayd that he was an heretike, & should dye a vile death. The poore man (whose name yet I haue not certainly learned) answearing for hym selfe againe, said, that he was no heretike, but was in the fayth of Christe. And where as thou sayest (sayd he) that I shall dye a vile death: thou thy selfe shalt dye a viler death, and that shortly, and so it came to passe: MarginaliaA notable example of Gods iudgement vpon a bloudy persecutor. For within halfe a yeare after the sayd Haruey was hanged, drawen, and quartered for treason, in the sayd towne of Calice. 

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Robert Harvey, Butler's replacement as commissary of Calais, was executed for treason in the spring of 1541.

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An other historie of one Dodde a Scottishe man, burned in Calice.

MarginaliaOne Dodde burned in Calice. AFter the burnyng of this poore man, there was also an other certaine scholer, counted to be a Scottish man, named Dodde, who commyng out of Germanie, was there taken with certaine Germaine bookes about hym, and being examined therupon, and standing constantly to the truth that he had learned, was therfore condemned to death, and there burned in the sayd towne of Calice, within the space of a yeare, or thereabout, after the other godly Martyr aboue mentioned.

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MarginaliaThe storye of W. Crosbowmaker, bearing a billet in Calice. And for so much as I am presently in hand with matters of Calice, I can not passe from thence without memory of an other certaine honest man of the same township, named William Button, aliás Crosbowmaker, although the tyme of this story is a litle more anciēt in yeares 

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This incident must have happened before William Warham's death in August 1532.

: which storie is this: William Crosbomaker a souldier of Calice & the kings seruaunt, being a man as some natures be, somewhat pleasantly disposed, vsed whē he met wt priestes, to demaund of them certaine mery questions of pastime, as these: MarginaliaW. Crosbowmakers questions. Whether if a man were sodenly taken, and wanted an other thing, he might not without offēce occupy one of þe Popes pardons, in steed of a broken paper?

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An other question was, whether in the worlde might better be wantyng Dogges, or Priestes. And if it were annsweared, that Dogges might rather be spared: to that he woulde replie agayne and inferre, that if there were no Dogges, we coulde make no moe, but if there lacked ignoraunt Priestes, we might soone, and too soone, make too many of them.

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It happened that in the tyme of D. Darley, Person of our Ladyes church in Calice, being Commissary there for Archbishop Warham, there came a blacke Fryer to Calice with the Popes pardons: who for. iiij. d. would deliuer a soule out of Purgatory. The fryer was ful of Romish vertues, for what money came for pardons by day, he bought no land with it at night. Thys foresaid William Button, alias Crosbowmaker, commyng to the pardons, and pretending that he would deliuer his father and frendes soules, asked if the holy father the Pope could deliuer soules out of Purgatory? The fryer said, there is no doubt of that. MarginaliaHeresie to doubt of the Popes charitie. Why then, quoth Button, dooth he not of charitie deliuer all the soules thereout? Of which words he was accused to the Commissarye, who at his appearing before the saide Commissary, confessed to haue asked such questions. The Commissary being angry thereat, sayd: Doubtest thou thereof, thou heretike? There was standing by a blacke fryer named Capel, an English man, who sayd to the Commissary, There is Tenne thousand of these heretikes betweene Graueling and Trere. Button answeared, Master fryer, of all men you may keepe silence. For your coate hath bene twise cut of from the faith. The first tyme your order was enioyned to haue your blacke coate shorter thē your white, and for the second tyme your order must goe to the furthest part of their church, and there sing an Antheme of our Lady. MarginaliaThis Anheme the blacke friers were inioyned to sing euery night to our Ladye, in prayse of her Conception. Wherof read before pag. 774. The Commissary at these wordes chafed, calling Button heretike, with many other opprobrious wordes. Then saide Button to the Commissarye, if your holy father the Pope may delyuer soules out of Purgatory, and wil not of charitie deliuer them, thē I would to God the king woulde make me Pope, and I would surely deliuer all out without money. At these woordes the Commissary raged, and reuiled Button exceedingly, causing hym to beare a billet, and procured his wages (which was vj. d. a day) to be taken frō him. Then wēt Button to the kinges maiestie, declaryng all the whole matter to MarginaliaW. Crosbowmaker pardoned of the king. his grace, who sent hym to Calice agayne, and gaue hym after that. viij. d. a day.

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A notable example, wherin may appeare, as well the despite of D. London, and other papiste, against the Gospellers, as also the fidelitie of a matrone towardes her husband.

MarginaliaThe cruell malice of D. London agaynst the Gospell. FOr so muche as mention was made a litle before of D. London, we wyll somewhat more adde of hym, because the matter seemeth neither impertinent nor vnfruitefull, to the entent it maye more euidently appeare what truth and trust is to be looked for of this cruel kynde of papistes. 

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This account first appeared in Rerum, p. 143. It is taken from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (London, 1550), STC 1234a, fo. 257r.

MarginaliaEx Edw. Hallo. This Doctor London was warden of the newe College in Oxford, where it happened that certaine plate was stolen and conueyed and brought vp to London, and solde to a Goldsmyth, named William Calaway. MarginaliaWilliam Calaway Goldsmith of London. This Calaway was a man of good and honest name, and reputation amongest his neighbours, but specially earnest and zelous towardes the Gospell, and a great mainteyner thereof. He had oftentimes before bought muche plate of the same man without any perill or daunger, wherfore he doubted the lesse of his fidelitie.

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At the last the principall MarginaliaThis principall was a Chaplein of the sayd Colledge. of the theft being taken, and the Goldsmyth also that was the byer being knowen, D. London, when he vnderstoode hym to be a fauourer of the

Gospel,
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