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1237 [1236]

K. Henry. 8. The trouble of Queene Katherine Parre.

after other pleasaunt talke, she for that tyme tooke her leaue of hys maiesty. Who after his maner, biddyng her farewell sweete harte (for that was hys vsuall terme to the Queene) licenced her to depart.

MarginaliaThe Bish. of Winchester taketh his occasion to worke hys mischiefe. At this visitation chaunced the Bishop of Winchester aforenamed to be present, as also at the Queenes takyng her leaue (who very well had printed in his memory the kinges sodayne interruptyng of the Quene in her tale, and fallyng into other matter) and thought that if the iron wer beaten whylest it was hote, and that the kynges humour were holpen, such mislikyng myght follow towardes the Quene, as might both ouerthrow her and all her endeuours: and only awayted some occasion to renew into the kynges memory, the former misliked argument. His expectation in that behalf dyd nothing fayle hym. For the king at that time shewed hym selfe no lesse prompt and redy to receyue any information, then the bishop was maliciously bent to stirre vp the kings indignation against her. The king immediately vpon her departure from hym, vsed these or lyke wordes: A good hearyng (quoth he) it is when women become such Clerkes, and a thyng much to my comfort, to come in mine old dayes to be taught by my wyfe.

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MarginaliaThe Bish. of Winchesters poysoned wordes to the kyng. The Byshop hearyng this, seemed to mislyke that the Queene should so much forgett her selfe, as to take vpō her to stand in any argument with his maiestie, whom hee to his face extold for his rare vertues, and especially for hys learned iudgement in matters of Religion, aboue, not onely Princes of that and other ages, but also aboue Doctours professed in Diuinitie, and sayde that it was an vnsemely thyng for any of his Maiesties subiects to reason and argue with him so malapertly, and greuous to hym for his parte and other of his Maiesties Councellours and seruauntes, to heare the same: and that they all by proufe knew hys wisedome to be such, that it was not nedefull for any to put him in mynd of any such matters: inferryng moreouer how dangerous and perillous a matter it is and euer hath bene for a prince to suffer such insolent wordes at his subiects hāds: who as they take boldnesse to contrary their soueraigne in wordes, so want they no will but onely power and strength to ouerthwart them in deedes.

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MarginaliaWinchesters accusation agaynst the Queene. Besides this, that the Religion by the Queene so stiffely mainteyned, did not onely disallow and dissolue the policie and politicke gouernement of Princes, but also taught the people that all thynges ought to be in common, so that what colour so euer they pretended, their opinions were in dede so odious, and for the Princes estate so perillous, that (sauyng the reuerence they bare vnto her for his Maiesties sake) they durst be bold to affirme that the greatest subiect in this land, speakyng those wordes that she did speake, and defendyng those argumentes that she did defend, had with indifferent iustice, by law deserued death.

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Howbeit for his part he would nor durst not, without good warrant from his Maiestie, speake his knowledge in the Queenes case, although very apparaunt reasons made for him, and such as his duetyfull affection towardes his Maiestie, and the zeale and preseruation of his estate, would scarcely geue him leaue to conceale, though the vtteryng therof might thorough her, and her faction, be the vtter destruction of him, and of such as in deede dyd chiefly tender the Princes safety, without his Maiestie would take vpon him to be their Protector, and as it were, their Buckler. Which if he would do (as in respect of his owne safetie he ought not to refuse) he with others of his faythfull Counsailours, could within short tyme disclose such treasons, cloked with this cloke of heresie, that his maiestie should easily perceyue how perilous a matter it is to cherish a Serpent within hys owne bosome. Howbeit he would not for hys part willingly deale in the matter, both for reuerent respect aforesayd, and also for feare lest the faction was growē alredy too great, there, with the princes safety, to discouer the same. And therwithall with heauy countenāce & whisperyng together with them of that sect there present, he held hys peace.

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MarginaliaWinchester abuseth the king with his flattering. These and such other kyndes of Winchesters flattering phrases, maruelously whetted the kyng both to anger and displeasure towardes the Queene, and also to be ielous and mistrustfull of hys owne estate. For the assuraunce whereof, Princes vse not to be scrupulous to do any thyng. Thus then Winchester with hys flatteryng woordes, seekyng to frame the kynges disposition after hys owne pleasure, so farre crept into the kyng at that tyme, and with doubtfull feares he wyth other hys fellowes so filled the kynges mistrustfull mynde, that before they departed the place, the kyng (to see belyke what they would do) had geuen cōmaundement, with warrant to certayne of them made for þt purpose, to consult together about the drawyng of certayne articles against the Quene, wherin her life might be touched: which the kyng by their perswasions pretended to be fully resolued not to spare, hauing any regour or colour of lawe to countenaunce the matter. Wyth this Commission they departed for that tyme from the king, resolued to put their pernicious practise to as mischieuous an execution.

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MarginaliaHow Winchester & hys fellowes deuise agaynst the Gospellers. During thys tyme of deliberation about this matter, they fayled not to vse all kynds of policies, and mischieuous practises, aswell to suborne accusers, as otherwise to betray her, in seeking to vnderstand what bookes, by law forbidden, shee had in her closet. And the better to bring their purpose to passe, because they would not vpon the sodeyne, but by meanes deale with her, they thought it best, at the first, to begin with some of those Ladies whom they knew to be great wyth her, and of her bloud. The chiefest wherof, as most of estimation and priuie to all her doyngs, were these: MarginaliaLady Harbert. the Ladye Harbert, afterward Countesse of Pembroke and sister to the Queene, and chiefe of her priuie chāber: MarginaliaLady Lane. the Lady Lane, beyng of her priuie chamber, and also her cosine germane: MarginaliaLady Tyrwitte. the Lady Tyrwitte of her priuie chāber, and for her vertuous disposition, in very great fauour and credite with her.

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It was deuised that these three aboue named shoulde first of all haue bene accused and brought to aunswere vnto the vi. Articles: and vpon their apprehension in the Court, their closet and coffers should haue bene searched, þt somewhat might haue bene founde, whereby the Queene might be charged, which being found the Queene her selfe presētly should haue bene taken, and likewise caryed by Barge by night vnto the Tower. MarginaliaWinchesters plateforme. This plateforme thus deuised, but yet in the ende commyng to no effect, the kyng by those aforesayd, was forthwyth made priuy vnto the deuice by Wynchester, and Wrisley, and his consent therunto demaūded. Who, (belyke to proue the Byshops malice, how farre it would presume) lyke a wyse politicke Prince, was contented (dissemblingly) to geue hys consent, and to allow of euery circumstaunce (knowing notwithstanding in the end what he would doe). And thus the day, the tyme, and the place of these apprehensiōs aforesayd was appointed: which deuise yet after was chaunged.

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The kyng at that tyme lay at White Hall, and vsed very seldome, beyng not well at ease, to styrre out of his chāber or priuie gallery: and few of his Counsell, but by especiall commaundement, resorted vnto hym, these onely except: who by reason of this practise, vsed oftener then of ordinarye to repayre vnto hym. Thys purpose so finely was handled, that it grew now within few dayes of the time appoynted for the execution of the matter, & the poore Queene knew not nor suspected any thyng at all: and therefore vsed after her accustomed maner, when shee came to visite the kyng, still to deale with hym touching Religion, as before shee dyd.

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The king al this while gaue her leaue to vtter her minde at the full, without contradiction: not vpon any euill minde or mislyking (ye must cōceaue) to haue her speedy dispatch, but rather closely dissembling with them, to try out the vttermost of Winchesters fetches. Thus after her accustomed conference with the kyng, when she had taken her leaue of hym (the tyme and day of Winchesters finall date approching fast vpon) it chaunced that the kyng of himselfe vpon a certayne nyght after her beyng with him, and her leaue taken of hym, in mislyking her Religion, brake the whole practise vnto one of hys Phisicions, eyther Doctor Wendie, or els Owen, but rather Wendy as is supposed: pretending vnto him, as though he intended not any longer to be troubled wyth such a Doctresse as shee was, and also declaring what trouble was in workyng agaynst her by certayne of her enemyes, but yet charging hym withall vpon perill of his lyfe, not to vtter it to any creature liuing: and therupon declared vnto hym the parties aboue named, with all circumstances, and when and what the finall resolution of the matter should be.

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The Quene all this while compassed about with enemyes and persecutours, perceaued nothing of all thys, nor what was working agaynst her, and what trappes were layde for her by Winchester and his felowes: so closely the matter was conueyed. But see what the Lord God MarginaliaThe wyles of this Architophel Winchester dispatched. (who from hys eternall throne of wisdome, seeth and dispatcheth al the inuentions of Architophel, and comprehendeth the wyly begily themselues) did for hys poore handmayden, in rescuing her from the pyt of ruine, wherunto she was ready to fall vnawares.

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MarginaliaThe Articles drawen agaynst the Queene how they came to her handes. For as the Lord would, so it came to passe, that the bill of Articles drawen agaynst the Queene, and subscribed with the kings owne hand (although dissemblingly ye must vnderstand) falling from the bosome of one of the foresayde Councellonrs, was founde and taken vp of some godly person, and brought immediately vnto the Queene. Who reading there the Articles comprised agaynst her, and perceiuing the kyngs owne hand vnto the same, for the sodaine

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feare
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