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1364 [1339]

Q. Mary. Inhibitiō for Printing. A dagger cast at Bourne preaching against K. Ed.

MarginaliaTermes of Papist and Hereticke forbidden. 1553.Papist or Heretike, and such like, and applying their whole care, study, and trauaile to liue in the feare of God, exercising their conuersations in such charitable and godly doing, as their liues may in deede expresse that great hunger and thirst of Gods glory and holy woord which by rashe talke and woordes many haue pretended: and in so doing they shal best please God, and liue without daungers of the lawes, and mainteine the tranquilitie of the Realme. Wherof as her highnes shalbe most glad, so if any man shall rashly presume to make any assemblies of people or at any publike assemblies or otherwise shall goe about to stirre the people to disorder or disquiet she mindeth according to her dutie, to see the same most surely reformed & punished according to her highnes lawes.

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And furthermore, for as much also as it is wel knowē that sedition and false rumours haue bene nourished and mainteyned in this Realme by the subtiltie and malice of some euyll disposed persons, MarginaliaFalse surmise agaynst true Preachers, Printers and Players. which take vpon them without sufficient authoritie to preach & to interprete the word of God after their owne braine in Churches and other places, both publike and priuate: & also by playing of Enterludes, and printing of false fond bookes, ballades, rymes, & other leude treatises in the English tongue MarginaliaHere was the head of Winchester. concernyng doctrine in matters now in question, and controuersie touchyng the high poyntes & misteries of christē religion, which bookes, ballades, rymes, and treatises, are chiefly by the Printers and Stationers set out to sale to her graces subiects of an euyll zeale, for lucre & couetous of vile gaine: MarginaliaPreaching, Printing, Reading, and playing of Enterludes, restrayned.her highnesse therfore straytly chargeth and commaūdeth al and euery of her said subiectes, of what soeuer state, condition, or degree they be, that none of them presume frō henceforth to preach, or by way of readyng in Churches or other publike or priuate places, except in scholes of the Vniuersitie, to interpret or teach any scriptures or any maner poynts of doctrine cōcernyng Religion, neither also to print any bookes, matter, ballade, ryme, Enterlude, processe, or treatise, nor to play any Enterlude, except they haue her graces special licence in writyng for the same, vpō payne to incurre her highnes indignation and displeasure.

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And her highnes also further chargeth and commaundeth all and euery her saide subiectes, that none of them of their own authoritie do presume to punish, or to rise against any offendour in the causes abouesaid, or any other offendour in wordes or deedes in the late rebellion committed or done by the Duke of Northumberland or his complices, MarginaliaThe whole cause of the rebellion done by the Duke of Northumberland reserued onely to the Queenes order. or to sease any of their goodes, or violently to vse any such offender by striking or imprisoning, or threatning the same, but wholy to referre the punishment of all suche offenders vnto her highnes & publike authoritie, wherof her maiestie myndeth to see due punishmēt, according to the order of her highnes lawes.

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Neuerthelesse, as her highnes myndeth not hereby to restraine and discourage any of her louyng subiectes, to geue from tyme to tyme true information against any such offenders in the causes abouesaid vnto her grace or her Counsaile, for the punishment of euery such offender, according to the effect of her highnes Lawes prouided in that part: so her said highnes exhorteth & straitly chargeth her said subiects to obserue her cōmaūdement & pleasure in euery part aforesaid, as they wyl auoyde her highnes said indignation and most greuous displeasure. The seueritie and rigour whereof, as her highnes shalbe most sory to haue cause to put the same in execution: so doth shee vtterly determine not to permit such vnlawfull and rebellious doinges of her subiects, wherof may ensue the daunger of her royal estate to remayne vnpunished, but to see her saide lawes touching these poyntes to be throughly executed, which extremities she trusteth all her said louing subiectes wyl forsee, dread, and auoyde accordingly: her saide highnes straytly charging and commaunding all Maiors, Sheriffes, Iustices of Peace, Bayliffes, Constables, and all other publique Officers and Ministers, diligently to see to the obseruyng and executyng of her saide commaundements and pleasure, and to apprehende all suche as shal willfully offende in this part, commyttyng the same to the next Gayle, there to remaine without bayle or mainprise tyll vppon certificate made to her highnes or her priuie Coūsaile, of their names and doinges, and vppon examination had of their offences, some further order shalbe taken for their punishment to the example of others, according to the effect and tenour of the Lawes aforesaid. Yeuen at our Manor of Richmond, the xviij. day of August, in the first yere of our most prosperous raigne.

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Maister Bourne preaching at Paules Crosse. 
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Block 5: Bourne's Sermon

The story of Bradford's appeasing a mob incited by Gilbert Bourne's Paul's Cross sermon (1563, pp. 904-05; 1570, p. 1570; 1576, p. 1339 and 1583, p. 1407 [recte 1409] is taken word for word from Robert Crowley's continuation of Lanquet's chronicle (see Robert Crowley, An epitome of cronicles ... to the reigne of our soveraigne Ladye Queene Elizabeth [London, 1559], STC 15217.5, sigs. Eeee4v-Ffff1r). This is Foxe's first extract from Crowley's chronicle, which will be his basic source for the political history of Mary's reign in the 1563 edition.

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The violence at Bourne's sermon, however, was known to Foxe when he wrote the Rerum. He will repeat an account of the incident, with different wording, in 1563, p. 1173; 1570, p. 1780; 1576, p. 1339 and 1583, p. 1604; this second account is an exact translation of the Rerum.

 

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Bourne's Sermon

Unsurprisingly, the margin points up the story of Bourne being rescued from an ugly crowd by Bradford and Rogers ('M. Iohn Bradford appeaseth the people' and 'Bradford, and Rogers garded the preacher'). The variation in terminology at the glosses 'Cranmer offereth to defend the doctrine of the boke of cōmōpraier' (1563) and 'Cranmer offereth to defend the doctrine of the seruice booke in english' (1570 and 1576) is possibly suggestive of changing views on the part of Foxe and his contemporaries about Cranmer's liturgy.

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MarginaliaMaister Bournes Sermon at Paules Crosse. August. 13.ABout this tyme or not long before, Boner Bishop of London being restored, appoynted Maister Bourne a

Canon of Paules to preache at the Crosse. Who afterwarde was Bishop of Bathe, hee taking occasion of the Gospell of the day to speake somewhat largely in iustifying of Boner beyng then present: MarginaliaNo maruell if Boner were so foule fallen away in such a vyle dungeon of the Marshalsey.which Boner, saide he, vppon the same Text in that place that day foure yeares had preached before, and was vppon the same most cruelly and vniustly cast into the most vile Dungeon of the Marshalsey, and there kept duryng the tyme of king Edwarde. His woordes sounded so euyll in the eares of the hearers, that they could not keepe silence, but beganne to murmure, and to sturre in suche sort, that the Maior and Aldermen with other estates then present, feared much an vproare. But the truth is, that one hurled a Dagger at the preacher, but who it was, it could not then be proued, albeit afterward it was knowen.

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In fine, the sturre was such, that the Preacher pluckt in his head, and durst no more appeare in that place. The matter of his Sermon tended muche to the derogation and disprayse of king Edwarde: whiche thing the people in no case coulde abide. MarginaliaM. Iohn Bradford appeaseth the people.Then Maister Bradford at the request of the Preachers brother, and other then beyng in the Pulpite, stoode foorth and spake so mildely, Christianly, and effectuously, that with fewe wordes he appeased al: and afterward MarginaliaBradford and Rogers garded the preacher.he and master Rogers conducted the preacher betwixt them from the Pulpit, to the Grammar schole doore, where they left hym safe, as further in the story of M. Bradford is declared. But shortly after they wer both rewarded with long imprisonment, and last of all with fire in Smythfield.

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The next sonday folowing, 

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The word 'day' in 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409], is 'Sunday' in the previous three editions. This is a misprint in the 1583 edition which changes the chronology.

MarginaliaAugust. 10. the Queenes Garde was at the Crosse with their weapons to garde the Preacher. And when quiet men withdrew them selues from the sermon, order was taken by the Maior, that the auncients of al companyes should be present, least the preacher should be discouraged by his smal auditory.

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About the fift day of September the same yeare MarginaliaSeptember. 5. Peter Martyr came to London from Oxford, where for a time he had bene cōmaunded to keepe his house, and found there the Archbishop of Canterbury, MarginaliaCranmer offereth to defend the doctrine of the seruice booke in english.who offered to defende the doctrine of the booke of Common prayer, both by the scriptures and Doctors, assisted by Peter Martyr and a few other, as hereafter ye shal heare. But whilest they were in hope to come to disputations, the Archbishop & other were imprisoned, but Peter Martyr was suffered to returne whence he came. 

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The entry for 5 September, concerning Peter Martyr, first appears in the 1563 edition and was taken from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff1v with 1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; 1583, p. 1397 [recte 1409]).

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MarginaliaOctober 1.The first day of October Queene Marye was crowned at Westminster, MarginaliaQueene Mary crowned. and the tenth day of the sayd moneth of October then folowing, began the parlament with a solemne Masse of the holy Ghost, after the popish maner, celebrated with great pompe in the Palace of Westminster. MarginaliaOctober. 10. The Parlament beginneth with a Masse. To the which Masse among the other Lordes, accordyng to the maner, should come the bishops, which yet remayned vndeposed, which were the Archb. of Yorke, Doct. Taylor Bishop of Lincolne, Iohn Harley bish. of Oxford. Of the bishops, MarginaliaTwo Byshops withdrew themselues from the sight of the Masse.doct. Taylor & master Harley presenting thēselues according to their duetie, and taking their place amongst the Lordes, after they sawe the Masse begyn, not abidyng the sight therof, withdrewe themselues from the company: for the which cause the Bishop of Lincolne beyng examined, and protestyng his fayth, was vppon the same commaunded to attend: who not long after at Alkerwyke by sicknes departed. 

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In the 1563 edition (p. 905), Foxe reports that John Taylor, the Bishop of Lincoln, was sent to the Tower after refusing to attend mass at the opening of Parliament. In subsequent editions (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339 and 1583, p. 1410) Foxe corrected this to say that Taylor was commanded to attend and died soon afterwards at Ankerwicke (in Sir Thomas Smith's house, although Foxe does not say so). This is a good example of the detailed correction of the first edition from well informed oral sources.

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MarginaliaM. Harley Byshop of Hereford put out of his Bishopricke.Maister Harley because he was maryed, was excluded both from the Parlament, and from his Bishoprike.

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Masse beyng done, the Queene accompayned with the Estates of the Realme, was brought into the Parlament house, there accordyng to the maner, to enter and begyn the consultatiō. MarginaliaStatutes of Premunire and other repealed.At which consultation or parlament were repealed al statutes made in the tyme of king Henry the eight for Premunire, and statuts made in king Edward the sixts tyme for administration of common prayer & the sacramēts in the English tongue: & further, the attainder of the duke of Northumberland was by this Parlament confirmed. MarginaliaAltars and Masses erected.In this meane while many men were forward in the erecting of aultars & masses in churches. And such as would sticke to the lawes made in king Edwardes tyme, tyl other should be established: some of them were marked and some presently apprehended. Among whom MarginaliaSyr Iames Hales knight.sir Iames Hales a knight of Kent, and Iustice of the Common place was one, who notwithstāding he had ventured his lyfe in quene Maryes cause, in that he would not subscribe to the disheriting of her by the kyngs wyl, yet for that he dyd at a quarter Sessions geue charge vppon the statutes made in the tyme of Henry the eight, and Edward the sixt, for the supremacie and religion, MarginaliaThe trouble of Iudge Hales.he was imprisoned in the Marshalsey, Counter, and Fleete, and so cruelly handled, & put in feare by talke that the Warden of the Fleete vsed to haue in his hearyng, MarginaliaA subtile policie. of such tormentes as were in preparyng for here-

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