Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the GlossesCommentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1424 [1399]

Q. Mary. A declaration of the preachers in prison how they will dispute.

Marginalia1554.ther, from the.xiij. of February, till the iiij. of Iune, and then at the commyng in of king Philip were taken downe.

MarginaliaAprill. 11.The. xj. day of April, was Syr Thomas Wyat beheaded and quartered at Tower hill, where hee vttered these woordes, touching the Lady Elizabeth, and the Earle of Deuonshyre. 

Commentary  *  Close

An example of repetition concerning Elizabeth was the story of Wyatt exonerating Elizabeth and Courtenay at his execution. One version of the story was printed in 1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469; another, more detailed, version of the story, derived from Sir Thomas White, was added in the 1570 edition. It is also interesting that the shorter version of the story was printed in indirect quotation in 1563 (p. 1001) but rendered in direct quotation in subsequent editions (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

[Back to Top]
> Concernyng (sayd he) what I haue sayd of other in my examination, to charge any other as partakers of my doynges, MarginaliaM. Wiats wordes touching the Lady Elizabeth.I accuse neither my Lady Elizabethes grace, nor my Lord of Deuonshyre. I can not accuse them, neither am I able to say, that, to my knowledge, they knew any thing of my rising. And when Doctour Weston told him, that his confession was otherwise before the Counsell, he aunswered: that whiche I sayd then, I sayd: but that which I say now, is true.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia
April. 17.
sir Iames Croft. M. Winter. Sir Nicholas Throgmorton.
Vppon the Tuesday beyng the. xvij. of Aprill, Syr Iames Croft, and Maister Wynter, were brought to the Guild hall, wyth whom also the same tyme, and to the same place was brought sir Nicholas Throgmorton, and there arraigned of treason, for that hee was suspected to be of the conspiracie with the duke of Suffolke, and the rest agaynst the Queene, where hee so learnedly and wisely behaued him selfe (as well in clearyng hys own case as also in openyng such lawes of the Realme as were then alledged agaynst hym) that the Quest which was charged with his matter, could not in conscience, but finde him not gilty: MarginaliaThe Quest troubled for sir Nicholas Throgmorton.for the which the sayd xij. persons of the Quest, being all substantiall mē of the Citie, were bounde in the summe of. 500. poundes a peece, to appeare before the Queenes coūsell at a day appointed, there to aūswere such thynges as should be layd against them for his acquityng. Which Quest appeared accordyngly before the Counsell in the Starre chamber vpon Wedensday, MarginaliaAprill. 25. beyng the. xxv. of Aprill, and S. Markes day. From whence, after certaine questionyng, they were committed to prison, Emanuell Lucar, and maister Whetstone were committed to the Tower and the other ten to the Fleete.

[Back to Top]

As concernyng the condemnation of Thomas Archbyshop of Cant. of Doctour Ridley, and M. Latymer, which was the. xx. of this moneth of April, & also of their disputations, because we haue sayd enough before, it shall not neede now to bestow any further rehearsall therof.

Marginalia
L. Thamas Gray behedded.
Aprill. 27.
The Friday next followyng, after the condemnation of thē, the xxvij. of Aprill Lord Thomas Gray the late Duke of Suffolkes brother, was beheaded at Tower hill.

Vpon the Saterday, MarginaliaApril. 28. being the. xxviij. of Aprill, Syr Iames Croft, and Maister Winter were agayne brought to the Guild hall, where Syr Iames Croft was arraigned and condemned, and because the day was farre spent, Maister Winter was not arraigned.

Marginalia
W. Thomas condemned.
May. 17.
Vpon the Thursday, being the. xvij. of May, William Thomas was arraigned at the Guild Hall, and there the same day condemned. Who the next day after, was hanged, drawne, and quartered. His accusation was, for conspiryng the Queenes death: which how true it was, I haue not to say. This is certaine, that he made a right godly end, and wrote many fruitefull exhortations, Letters and Sonets in the prison before his death.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA certain disputation intended to be had at Cambridge.In the moneth of May it was so giuen out, and bruited abroad, that a solemne disputation should bee holden at Cambridge (as ye hard before in Maister Ridleys letter pag. 1394.) betwene M. Bradford, M. Saunders, maister Rogers, 

Commentary  *  Close

In the introductory comments Foxe made to the declaration by leading protestants opposing the idea of a disputation at Cambridge, Foxe reminded his readers that Ridley had reported rumours of the proposed disputation in a letter to Cranmer. Foxe stated that John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and John Rogers were the proposed disputants (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469). But Ridley had stated in his letter that they were Bradford, Edward Crome and Rogers (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

[Back to Top]
and other of that side, and the Doctours of both the Vniuersities on the other side, like as had bene in Oxford before, as you haue heard. Wherupon the godly preachers which were in prison hauyng word therof, albeit they were destitute of their bookes, neither were ignoraunt of the purpose of the aduersaries, and how the cause was preiudicate before, also how the disputations were confusedly handled at Oxford: neuerthelesse they thought not to refuse the offer of disputation, so that they might be quietly and indifferently heard, and therefore wisely ponderyng the matter with themselues, by a publicke consent, directed out of prison a declaration of their mynde by writyng, the viij. day of May. Wherein first as touchyng the disputation, although they knew that they should do no good, whereas all thyngs were so predetermined before, yet neuerthelesse, they would not deny to dispute, MarginaliaThe Preachers in prison refuse not to dispute before indifferent Iudges.so that the disputation might be either before the Queene, or before the Counsaile, or before the Parlament houses, or els if they might dispute by writyng: for els if the matter were brought to the Doctours handlyng in their owne scholes, they haue sufficient proufe (they sayd) by the experience of Oxford, what little good will be done at Cambridge: and so consequently declaryng the fayth and doctrine of their Religion, and exhortyng the people withall to submit them selues with all patience and humilitie, either to the will or punishment of the higher powers, they appealed in the end frō them to be their Iudges in this behalfe, and so end their Protestatiō: the copy and contentes wherof I thought not vnfitte here to be inserted.

[Back to Top]
¶ A copie of a certayne declaration drawen and sent out of prison by Maister Bradford, Maister Saūders, and diuers other godly preachers, concernyng their disputation, and doctrine of their Religion, as foloweth. 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 27: The declaration of Bradford et al.

The declaration of 8 May 1554 by the leading incarcerated protestants protesting against a projected disputation in Cambridge was printed without alteration in every edition of the Acts and Monuments; unusually even the paragraph breaks were unaltered (1563, pp. 1001-03; 1570, pp. 1640-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71). The basic reason for this textual stability was that, from Foxe's perspective, this document was an answered prayer, too valuable to dream of cutting, abridging or paraphrasing. The declaration goes into detail about the unfairness of the Oxford disputations and then continues with a ringing confession of faith, defending justification by faith and attacking Latin services, the intercession of saints, purgatory, transubstantiation and clerical celibacy. It concludes with a denunciation of rebellion and an insistence of their loyalty to the queen.

[Back to Top]

 

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
The Declaration of Bradford and others

Many of the glosses in the section dealing with the preachers' concerns and conditions reflect the procedural objections which emerged from the Oxford disputations. Most of the glosses in the section containing the confession of the preachers are simply guides to the points made. The emphasis that the motive for this confession was 'quiet of conscience' not 'curiositie' ties in with the obstinacy/constancy contrast in the glosses to Mantell's apology earlier. There are two glosses pointing to exhortations to obedience: Foxe was clearly anxious to distance martyrdom from resistance.

[Back to Top]
MarginaliaA declaration of the godly Preachers written and sent abrode out of Prison.BEcause we heare that it is determined of the magistrats and such as be in authoritie, especially of the Clergye, to send vs speedely out of the prisons of the Kyngs Bench, þe Fleet, the Marshalsey, and Newgate where presently we are, and of long tyme some of vs hath ben, not as rebelles, traytors, seditious persons, theeues, or transgressours of any lawes of thys realme, inhibitions, Proclamations, or commaundementes of the Queenes highnes, or of any of þe Councelles (Gods name be praised therfore) but alonely for the conscience we haue to God and hys most holy worde & truth, vpon most certayne knowledge: because we say, we heare that it is determined, we shall be sent to one of the vniuersities of Cambridge, MarginaliaA talke of a pretensed disputation to be had at Cambridge. or Oxford, there to dispute wyth such as are appoynted in that behalfe: in that we purpose not to dispute otherwyse then by wrytyng, except it may be before the Queenes hyghnes and her Counsell, or before þe Parlament houses, and therfore perchaunce it wyll be bruted abroad, that we are not able to mayntayne by the truth of Gods worde, and the consent of the true & Catholicke Church of Christ, the doctrine we haue generally and seuerally taught, and some of vs hath writtē & set forth (wherthrough the godly and simple may be offended & somwhat weakened): we haue thought it our bounden dutye, now whylest we may, by wryting to publishe and notifie the causes why we will not dispute other wise then is aboue sayde, to preuent the offences which myght come therby.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe causes why they will not otherwise dispute, then before indifferent Iudges.First, because it is euidently knowen vnto the whole world, that the determinations of both the Vniuersities in matters of Religion, especially wherein we shoulde dispute, MarginaliaThe matter of the disputaciō is against Gods word.are directly agaynst Gods word, yea agaynst their owne determinations in the tyme of our late soueraigne Lorde and most godly Prince, kyng Edward: and further it is knowē they be our open enemyes, and haue already condemned our causes, before any disputation had of the same.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe second cause.Secondly, because the Prelates and clergie do not seeke eyther vs or the veritie, but our destruction and their glory. For if they had sought vs (as charitie requireth) thē would they haue called vs forth hereaboutes before their lawes were so made, that franckly and wythout perill we myght haue spoken our consciences. MarginaliaIn the disputatiō neyther charitie not verity sought for.Agayne, if they had sought for the veritie, they would not haue concluded of controuersies, tofore they had bene disputed: so that it easely appeareth, that they seeke their owne glory and our destruction, and not vs and the veritie: and therfore we haue good cause to refuse disputation, as a thyng which shall not further preuayle, then to the settyng forth of their glory, and the suppression of the veritie.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe third cause.Thirdly, because the Censors & Iudges, (as we heare who they be) are manifest enemyes to the truth, MarginaliaThe Iudges of the disputation professed enemyes against the trueth. and that which worse is, obstinate enemyes, before whom pearles are not to be cast, by the commaundementes of our Sauior Iesus Christ, and by his owne example. That they be such their doings of late at Oxford, and in the Conuocatiō house in October last past, do most euidently declare.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe 4. cause.Fourthly, because some of vs haue bene in prison these 8. or 9. monethes, MarginaliaWant of bookes necessary for disputation.where we haue had no bookes, no paper, no penne, no inke, or conuenient place for study, we thynke we should doo euill thus sodaynly to descend into disputation wyth them, which may alledge as they list, the fathers and their testimonies, because our memories haue not that which we haue read so readily, as to reproue, when they shal report and wrest the authors to their purpose, or to bryng forth that we may haue there for our auauntage.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe 5. cause.Fiftly, because in disputation we shall not be permitted to prosecute our Argumentes, but be stopped when we would speake, one saying thus, an other that, the thyrd hys mynde. &c. As was done to the godly learned fathers especially D. Ridley at Oxford, MarginaliaExample of the disputation at Oxford.who could not be permitted to declare hys mynde and meanyng of the propositions, & had oftentimes halfe a dosen at once speakyng agaynst hym: alwayes letting hym to prosecute hys argument, and to answere accordingly: we wil not speake of the hyssing, scoffing, and tauntyng, which wonderfully then was vsed. If on thys sort and much worse they handled these fathers, much more wyll they be shameles bold with vs if we should enter into disputation with them.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe 6. cause.Sixtly, because the Notaries that shall receiue & write the disputations, shalbe of their appointment, and such as either do not or dare nor fauour the truth, MarginaliaNotaryes not indifferent.and therfore must write eyther to please them, or els they themselues (the Censours and Iudges we meane) at their pleasure wyll put to and take from, that which is written by þe Notaries,

[Back to Top]
who
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield