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1427 [1402]

Q. Mary. The receauing of King Phillip in London.

Marginalia1554.After the consūmation of which mariage, they both remoued frō Winchester to sondrye other places, MarginaliaK. Phillip commeth to Windsore.and by easy iourneyes came to Windsore Castle, where hee was stalled in the order of the Garter, vppon sondaye beyng the xij. of August. MarginaliaThe Armes of England taken downe, and the armes of Spayne set vp.At which tyme an Herald tooke downe the armes of England at Wyndsore, and in the place of them woulde haue set the armes of Spayn, but he was commaunded to set them vp agayne by certayne Lordes. From thence they both remoued to Richmond, MarginaliaK. Phillip commeth to London.and frō thence by water came to London, and landed at the Byshop of Winchesters house, through which they passed both into Southwarke parke, & so to Southwarke house called Suffolke place, where they lay that night being the 18. of August.

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And the next day, being Saterday. MarginaliaAugust. 19. and the xix. of August 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1570 edition, Foxe followed the verses with a description of Philip's progress from Winchester to London and his entry into London. The account of Philip's entry into London may have been taken from John Elder's A copie of a letter sente unto Scotland (London, 1555), STC 7552, sigs. B5r-C4v. This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that Foxe would draw other material in the Acts and Monuments from Elder's book. But on closer examination, this looks unlikely. Some important portions of Foxe's account of Philip's entry into London, notably the story of Gardiner painting out a picture of Henry VIII holding a Bible, are not in Elder. (A brief version of this story is in Foxe's papers but it lacks much of the detail of Foxe's account; cf. BL Harley MS 419, fol. 131r with 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1472). Another objection to Elder as Foxe's source is that other material Foxe drew from Elder first appeared in 1563; Philip's entry did not appear until the 1570 edition. Most likely, Foxe drew this account of Philip's entry from an eyewitness, possibly augmented by a chronicle or chronicles.

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the Kyng and Quenes maiesties rode from Suffolke place (accompanied with a great number as wel of noble men as gentlemen) through the Citie of London, to White Hall and at London bridge as he entred at the draw bridge, MarginaliaVayne pageants of London.was a vayne great spectacle set vp, two Images representyng two Giantes, one named Corineus, and the other Gogmagoge, 
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The images of the two giants, 'Corineus' and 'Gogmagog' which Foxe describes (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1472) were images of Corineus Brittanus and Gogmagog Albionus, both characters in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Britons. For the significance of these images in this entry, see Sydney Anglo, Spectacle, Pageantry and Early Tudor Policy, 2nd edition (Oxford, 1997) pp. 327-29.

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holdyng betwene them certayn Latin verses, which for the vayne ostentation of flattery, I ouer passe.

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And as they passed ouer the bridge, there was a number of ordinaunce shot at the Tower, suche as by olde mens reporte the lyke hath not bene heard or seene these hundreth yeares.

From London Bridge they passed to the Conduit in Gracious streete whiche was finely painted, and among other thinges, the. ix. worthyes, whereof Kyng Henry the eyght was one. He was painted in harnesse hauyng in one hand a sworde, & in the other hand a booke, whereupon was written Verbum Dei, deliueryng the same booke (as it were) to his sonne K. Edward, who was Painted in a corner by him. MarginaliaWinchester can not abyde the booke called Verbum Dei.But hereupon was no small matter made for the Byshop of Winchester Lord Chauncellor, MarginaliaThe painter sent for to the B. of Winchester.sent for the Painter, and not onely called hym knaue for paintyng a booke in kyng Henries hand, and specially for writing thereupon Verbum Dei, but also rancke Traytour and Villayne, saying to him that hee shoulde rather haue put the booke into the Quenes hand (who was also paynted there( for that she had reformed the church and religion, with other thinges, according to the pure and sincere word of God in deede.

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The Paynter aunswered and sayd, MarginaliaThe Painters aunswere.that if he had knowē that that had bene the matter wherfore his Lordshyp sent for hym, hee coulde haue remedied it, and not haue troubled his Lordshyp.

The Bishop aunswered & said, that it was the Queenes maiesties will and commaundement that he shoulde sende for him: and so commaunding him to wype out the booke and Verbum Dei too, he sent him home. So the Paynter departed, but fearyng lest he should leaue some parte eyther of the booke, or of Verbum Dei in kyng Henries hand, hee wyped away a peece of hys fingers withall.

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Here I passe ouer and cut of other gaudes and Pageantes of pastime shewed vnto hym in passing through London, wyth the flattering verses set vp in Latine, wherein were blased out in one place the fiue philips, MarginaliaV. Phillips. as the fiue worthies of the world, Philip of Macedonia Philip the Emperour, Philippus, Audax Philippus Bonus, Philip Prince of Spayne and kyng of England.

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In another Poetry kyng Philip was resembled by an Image representing Orpheus, and al Englysh people resembled to brute and sauage beastes folowing after Orpheus harpe, and daunsing after kyng Philips pipe. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe's interpretation of the pageant of Orpheus (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1472) is tendentious; other comtemporary observers (e.g., Elder, Copie of a letter, sigs. B8v-C1v) did not perceive the alleged insult to the English.

Not that I reprehend the arte of the Latine verses, which was fine and cunning, but that I passe ouer the matter, hauing other grauer thinges in hand, and therefore passe ouer also the sight at paules church side of hym that came downe vpon a rope tyed to the batilmentes wyth hys head before, neyther staying himselfe with hand nor foote: which shortly after cost him his life.  
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Foxe's mention of a man who plunged headfirst from St. Paul's (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1472) refers to an acrobat who performed the sixteenth-century equivalent of bungee-jumping to celebrate the occasion (see Anglo, Spectacle, pp. 336-37). Foxe's concluding comment suggests that the acrobat performed this stunt once too often.

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But one thing by the way I can not let passe touchyng the young florishing Roode newely set vp agaynst this present tyme to welcome kyng Philip into Paules Church. 

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The story of the 'merry fellow' who mocked the newly-erected rood in St. Paul's originally appeared in an appendix to the 1563 edition and was moved to its proper chronological place in the 1570 edition. It is unquestionably an oral anecdote related to Foxe as the printing of the 1563 edition neared completion.

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The settyng vp of whiche Roode was this, and may make as good a Pageant as the best.

MarginaliaThe erecting vp of the Roode at Paules. An. 2. Mariæ Boner in his royaltie, and all his Prebendaries about hym in Paules Quiere, the Roode layd a long vpon the pauement, and also all the doores of Paules beyng shut, the Byshop with other, sayd and song diuers prayers by the Roode: that beyng done, they annoynted the Roode with oyle in diuers places, and after the annointyng, crept vnto it and kissed it. MarginaliaB. Boners God.

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After that they tooke the sayd Roode and weyed hym vppe and set hym in his olde accustomed place, MarginaliaThe Roode of Paules set vp with Te Deum.and all the while they were doyng thereof, the whole Quiere sang Te Deum, and when that was ended, they rang the Belles,

not onely for ioy, but also for the notable and great fact they had done therein.

Not long after this, a mery fellow came into Paules, and spyed the Roode with Mary and Iohn new set vp, whereto (among a great sorte of people) he made lowe curtesie and sayd: MarginaliaSalutation to the Roode of Paules.Syr, your Maistership is welcome to Towne. I had thought to haue talked further with your Maistershyp, but that ye be here clothed in the Queenes coulours. I hope ye be but a sōmers byrd, in that ye be dressed in white and greene. &c.

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The Prince thus beyng in the Church of Paules, after Doctour Harpesfield had finished his Oration in Latin, set forward through Fleetestreet, and so came to White hall, where he with the Queene remayned foure dayes after, and from thence remoued vnto Richmond.

After this, all the Lordes had leaue to depart into their countreyes, with straite commaundement to bryng all their harnesse and artillery into the Tower of London with all speede. 

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The remainder of the material in this block - Philip and Mary retiring to Hampton Court, Bonner's visitation, and a proclamation against vagabonds and servants without masters - was added in 1570 from unidentifiable sources (1570, pp. 1654-55; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

Now remayned there no English Lord at the court but the Byshop of Winchester. From Richmond they remoued to Hampton Court, where the hall doore within the Court was continually shut, so that no man might enter, vnles his arrand were first knowen: whiche seemed straunge to English men that had not bene vsed thereto.

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MarginaliaSeptemb. 8.About the eight day of September, Byshop Boner began his visitation, who charged vj. men in euery Parish to inquire (according to theyr othes) and to present before hym the day after S. Mathewes day, beyng the xxij. of September, all such persons as eyther had or should offend in any of hys Articles, which he had set forth to the number of. 37. Of the which visitation of Boner, I haue somewhat more largely to entreate, after that fyrst I shall ouerpasse a few other thyngs folowyng in course of this present story.

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MarginaliaSeptemb. 17.The. xvij. day of September was a Proclamatiō in London, that all Vacabondes and masterles men, as well straungers as English men, should depart the Citie within. fiue dayes: and straitly chargyng al Inholders, Victulers, Tauerners, and Alehousekeepers, with all other that sell victuals, that they (after the sayd fiue dayes) should not sell any meate, drinke, or any kynde of victuall to any seruyngman whatsoeuer, vnlesse he brought a testimoniall frō his Maister to declare whose seruaunt he was, and were in continuall household with his sayd Maister, vpon payne to runne in daunger of the law if they offend herein.

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Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation

As with Harpsfield's disputation, Foxe is keen to correct what he sees as popish errors: for example, the historical point about the doctrine of the natural presence. The anger follows the pattern of ostensible provocation by an attack on the godly (preachers in this case). The glosses concerned with Bonner's visitation are relatively restrained in their criticism: the reported actions of the bishop were presumably damning enough. Foxe marks the itinerary, and twice mentions his 'behauiour', priming the reader to focus on his conduct. Other glosses list his insulting and violent behaviour, making clear the rank and status of those abused to compound the sense of disorderly proceeding. The glosses suggest Bonner was both vicious and ridiculous: he goes in a 'pelting chase' which suggests a lack of self-control and is easily put down by Sir Thomas Josselin . Glosses note the discrepancies between editions that follow the usual pattern of 1583 being less accurate than earlier editions; also noted are examples of a mistake in 1570 corrected in later editions.

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MarginaliaSeptemb. 30.Vppon the Sonday followyng being the. xxx. day of September 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 30: Gardiner's sermon to Bonner's visitation

Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 was mentioned, and a brief summary of it given, in 1563 (p. 1008). This was replaced in the next edition by a fuller and more detailed account (1570, p. 1644; 1576, pp. 1402-03; 1583, p. 1473). This account was based on notes taken by someone in the audience which survive in Foxe's papers (BL Harley 425, fol. 118r). The account printed by Foxe is more detailed than the material in his papers, and more hostile to Gardiner: Foxe seems to have embellished his source.

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the Byshop of Winchester Lord Chauucellour of England preached at Paules Crosse, MarginaliaThe B. of Winchester preacheth.at whose sermon were present all the Coūsell that were at the Court, namely the Marques of Winchester, the Earle of Arundell, Lord North, Syr Anthony Browne, Maister Rochester, Maister Walgraue, Maister Englefild, Lord Fitzwaters and Secretary Peter, & the Byshop of London, Duresme, & Ely, which iij. sat vnder the Byshops armes. The Gospell wherof he made his Sermon is writtē in the. xxij. chap. of .Math. Where the .Phariseis. came vnto Christ, & amōgst them one asked Christ which was the greatest commaundement. Christ aunswered: Thou shalt loue thy Lord God with all thy hart. &c. and thy neighbour as thy selfe, in these two is comprehended the law and the Prophetes.

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After his longe declaration of these wordes, speakyng very much of loue and charitie, at the last he had occasion vpon S. Iames his wordes to speake of the true teachers, and of the false teachers, saying, MarginaliaA blasphemous mouth agaynst the true preachers of Gods word.that all the Preachers almost in Kyng Edwardes tyme preached nothyng but voluptuosnesse, and filthy and blasphemous lyes, affirmyng their doctrine to be that false doctrine wherof S. Iames speaketh: saying, that it was full of peruerse zeale, earthly, ful of discorde and discension, that the preachers aforenamed would report nothing truly, & that they taught that it was lawfull for a man to put awaye his wyfe for adultery and marry an other, and that if a man vowed to day, hee might breake it to morrowe at hys pleasure, with many other thinges which I omit. MarginaliaThe Church neuer confessed the naturall body of Christ so to be in the Sacrament, that the substance of bread was taken away before the tyme of pope Innocent. 3. anno. 1215.And when he spoke of the Sacrament, he sayd that al the Church from the begynnyng haue cōfessed Christes naturall body to be in heauen, & here to be in the Sacramēt, and so concluded that matter: & then willed al men to say with Iosephes brethrē: Peccauimus in fratrē. We haue all sinned agaynst our brother, & so (sayd he) haue I to. Then hee declared what a noble King & Queene we haue, saying that if he should go about to shew that the Kyng came hether for no necessitie or neede, & what hee had brought wt him, it shoulde be superfluous, seyng it is euidētly knowen that he hath x. tymes as much as we are in hope & possession of, MarginaliaWinchester preacheth in commendation of King Phillip.affirmyng him to be as wyse, sober, gentle and temperate a Prince as euer was in England, and if it were not so proued, thē to take hym for a false lyar for his so saying: Exhortyng all men to make much of him, and to wynne

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him
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