Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the GlossesCommentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1526 [1500]

Q. Mary. The Martyrdome of Iohn Ardeley, and Iohn Symson. Iohn Tooly.

MarginaliaAn. 1555. Iune.his heeles, and leauing his seate, he with the rest of that court betooke them to their legges, hastening with all speede possible to recouer the doore that went into the bishops house: but the rest being somewhat lighter of foote then my Lord, dyd sooner recouer the doore, and thronging hastily to get in, kept the bishop styl out, and cryed: Saue my Lord, saue my Lord, but meanyng yet first to saue them selues, if any daunger shoulde come, whereby they gaue the standers by good matter to laugh at: resēblyng in some part a spectacle not much vnlike to þe old stagers of Oxford, worse feared then hurt, when as the Churche there was noysed to be on fire, wherof ye may read before. pag. 1180.

[Back to Top]

But of this matter enough.

MarginaliaIohn Symson and Iohn Ardeley sent into Essex to be executedNow Iohn Symson and Iohn Ardeley being deliuered (as is aforesaide) to the Sheriffes, were shortly after sente downe from London to Essex, where both they on one daye (which was about the. x. day of Iune) were put to death, albeit in seuerall places: for MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Symson, and Ardeley. Iune. 10.Iohn Symson suffered at Rochford, Iohn Ardeley þe same day was had to Rayley, where he finished hys martyrdome most quietly in the quarrel of Christes Gospel. 

Commentary  *  Close

This last clause was added in the 1570 edition; it is quite possible that this reflects Foxe's belief that this is what should have happened, rather than reflecting any new information as to what actually happened.

[Back to Top]
¶ A note of Iohn Ardeley.

FOr the better consideration of the rigorous crueltie of these Catholike dayes, this is furthermore not vnworthy of all men to be noted and knowen to all posteritie, concerning the examinations of this Ardeley and his companye: howe that they being brought before the Commissioners were by them greatly charged of stubbornnes and vayne glorie. Vnto whom they aunsweared in defence of their owne simplicitie, that they were content willingly to yeld to the Queene all their goodes and landes, so that they might be suffered to liue vnder her, in keeping their conscience free from all Idolatrie and papistical religion. Yet this would not be graunted, although they had offered all to their hart bloud: so greedy and so thirsty be these persecutors of Christian bloud. The Lord geue them repentāce if it be his wil, and kepe from them the iuste reward of such cruell dealing. Amen.

[Back to Top]
The ridiculous handling and proceedyng of Bishop Boner and his mates againste Iohn Tooly, first suspected and condemned after his death, and then digged out of his graue, and geuen to the secular power, and so burned for an heretike. 
Commentary  *  Close
John Tooley and Bromley's Examination

A narrative of Tooley's execution for theft, denunciation of the pope, the posthumous excommunication of him and the exhumation of his body were printed in the Rerum (pp. 443-44). This narrative was reprinted in all editions of the Acts and Monuments. In the first edition of the Acts and Monuments, Foxe added the letter sent to Bonner from the privy council, dated 28 April 1555, and Bonner's writ beginning the process of excommunication against Tooley as well as the depositions regarding Tooley's words on the scaffold and the examination of Robert Bromley. All of this material came from official records, now lost. There was probably a separate register kept for this case alone.

[Back to Top]

Nothing in this account was altered in subsequent editions of the Acts and Monuments

 

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
John Tooly

Many of the glosses (apart from the narrative pointers) are adversarial, and seek to show the absurdity of burning Tooly's bones. The use of the term 'Councell' ('A Councell called agaynst Tooly') seems designed to mock the excessive effort given over to the pursuit of Tooly after his death. Pole's name is linked with the practice ('Cardinall Poole a great doer in burning dead mens Bones'; 'M. Bucer Paulus Phagius, Peter Martyrs wyfe. Iohn Tooly, burned for heretickes after their death'). Another gloss investigates Bonner's motives and denies his assertion that he was motivated by conscience; his motivation was rather simply obedience to the Council, an attitude which could be more easily allied to the stereotype of Bonner as passionate and fearful than could the notion of a delicate conscience ('Note how Boner here pretendeth conscience in prosecuting this matter. when onely he was commaunded vnto it by the Counsells letters'). There is also a suggestion that the attack on Tooly's remains was a ploy to reveal sympathisers ('The Bishop layeth his bayte to catch whom he may trouble').

[Back to Top]
MarginaliaThe story of Iohn Tooly.ABout the same tyme of the burnyng of these ij. aforesaid, in the beginnyng of the said moneth of Iune, fell out a solemne processe and much adoo was made by the Popes spiritualtie against Iohn Tooly, in a case of heresie. The story is this. There was about the tyme that the Spaniards began first to keepe a stur 
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., when the Spaniards first began to be a notable presence in England.

in Englād, one Io. Tooly, a citizen & Pulter in London, who conspired with certain other of his societie to rob a Spaniard at s. Iames: & although the dede were heinous & wicked of it self, yet was it aggrauated & made greater then it was by other, beyng cōmitted against such a person, & against such a countrey, which both the queene & her whole court dyd highly fauor.  
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is intimating that Tooley was treated more harshly than he otherwise would have been because his victim was Spanish.

The robbery being knowen, & brought into iudgemēt, this Tooly was found gyltie, and iudged to be hanged, wheras notwithstanding in this Realme there are many mo thefts committed, then theeues executed.

[Back to Top]

The foresaide Tooly beyng lead to the gallowes (which stoode fast by Charing Crosse) a litle before he dyed, standing vppon the Carte, readde a certayne prayer in a printed booke, and two other prayers written in two seuerall papers, who then hauyng the haltar about hys necke, desired the people there present to pray for hym, and to beare him witnes that MarginaliaIohn Tooly dyed a true Christian man.he dyed a true Christian man, and that he trusted to be saued onely by the merites of Christes passion and shedding of his precious bloud, MarginaliaThe Christen confession of Tooly.and not by anye Masses, or Trentalles, 

Commentary  *  Close

Trentals were a set of 30 requiem masses said on behalf of the dead.

Images, or Saintes, which were (as he saide) meere Idolatrie and superstition, and deuised by the Bishop of Rome: and as he the same Tooly, and two other his felowes, which were there hanged with him, dyd steale and robbe for couetousnes, so MarginaliaThe couetousnes of the Pope.the bishop of Rome dyd sell his Masses and Trentalles, 
Commentary  *  Close

Trentals were a set of 30 requiem masses said on behalf of the dead.

with such other pelfrie for couetousnes, and there beyng in a great anger (as appeared) against the Bishop of Rome, spake with a loude voyce these woordes folowing: From the tyrannie of the Bishop of Rome, and all his detestable enormities: From false doctrine and heresie, and from contempt of thy worde and commaundement, good Lord deliuer vs.

[Back to Top]

And then adding further to the same, he spake vnto the people: All you that be true Christian men, say with me, Amen. And immediatly therupon three hundred persons

and more, to the iudgement & estimation of those that were there present, MarginaliaEx Registro. answeared and said, Amen, three tymes together at the least.

After this it happened, that when Tooly had readde the Byll the firste tyme, it fell from hym: and a certayne young man (who was thought to be a Prentise) 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., an apprentice.

stouped downe and tooke vp the Byll, and clymed vp by the Cart, and deliuered it vnto Tooly againe, which he againe dyd reade to the people. That done, hee deliuered vnto one of the Marshialles Officers the booke aforesayd, and wylled hym to deliuer it to one Haukes, saying that it was his Booke. Furthermore, he deliuered one of the Prayers written in a paper, to one Robert Bromley Sergeaunt, whiche desired to haue it of hym. Vpon the toppe of which Byll  
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., paper.

was written a lyne, conteynyng these woordes: Beware of Antichriste: and subscribed vnderneath: Per me Thomam Harold prisoner in the Marshalsey, enimie to Antichrist. For the Byll  
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., paper.

the foresayd Rob. Bromley was brought afterward Coram nobis,  
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Bromley was brought before Bishop Bonner's court.

& was faine to aske pardon of the Bishop, and to detest all the woordes of Tooly, and glad so to escape.

[Back to Top]

Thus while Tooly had made hys prayers, as is aboue saide, to be deliuered from the Popes tyrannie, by the same prayer he fel into great tyrannie. For so sone as the brute 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., report or rumour.

of this fact came vnto the eares of the priestes & mitred prelates, they were not a litle mad thereat, thinking it not tollerable that so great a reproch should bee done against the holy father. MarginaliaA Councell called against Tooly.Calling therfore a Counsaile together, as though it had bene a matter of great importance, Toolyes talke at his death was debated among them selues.

[Back to Top]

At the last (after much Pro and Contra) they all consented to those mens iudgementes, which thought it meete that the violatyng of the Popes holynes shoulde be reuenged wyth fire and fagot. And I do easily beleue, that Cardinal Poole was no smal doer in this sentence: MarginaliaCardinall Poole a great doer in burning dead mens Bones.for as Winchester and Boner dyd alwayes thirst after the bloud of the liuyng, so Pooles lightning was for the most part kindled against the dead: and he reserued thys charge onely to hym selfe, I knowe not for what purpose, except peraduenture beyng loth to be so cruell as the other, he thought neuerthelesse by this meanes to discharge his duetie towarde the Pope. By the same Cardinalles like lightenyng and fiery fiste, MarginaliaM. Bucer Paulus Fagius, Peter Martyrs wyfe, Iohn Tooly, burned for heretickes after their death.the bones of Martin Bucer, and Paulus Phagius, whiche had lyen almoste two yeares in their graues, were taken vp and burned at Cambridge, as Toolyes carkas was here at London. And besides this, because he would shewe some token of his diligence in both Vniuersities, he caused Peter Martyrs wyfe, a woman of worthy memorie, to be digged out of the Churchyard and to be buried on the dunghyl. Of these two prodigious actes ye shal heare more hereafter. But nowe to our purpose of Tooly, whiche hauing ended his prayer, was hanged, and put into his graue, out of the whiche he was digged againe, by the commaundement of the Bishops, and because he was so bold to derogate the authoritie of the bishop of Rome at the time of his death, it pleased them to iudge and cōdemne him as an heretike, vpon the commaundement of the Coūsailes letter, as here appeareth.

[Back to Top]
A letter sent vnto Boner Bishop of London, from the Counsaile. 
Commentary  *  Close

Bonner's normal practice was to copy letters to him from the queen or the privy council into his register; this letter is an exception. This suggests that all the materials relating to the case of Tooley were kept in a separate register.

MarginaliaThe Counsels letter to B. Boner, concerning Tooly.AFter our very hartye commendations to your Lordship, vnderstanding that of late amongest others that haue suffered about London for their offences, one leude person that was condemned for felonie, died very obstinately, professing at the time of his death sundrye hereticall and erroneous opinions: like as we thinke it not conuenient that such a matter should be ouerpassed without some example to the world, so haue we thought good to pray your Lordship, to cause further enquirie to be made therof, and thereupon to proceede to the making out of such processe as by the Ecclesiastical lawes is prouided in that behalfe. And so we byd your Lordship hartily wel to fare. From Hampton Court, the. 28. of April. 1555.

[Back to Top]

Your Lordships louing frendes,


Ste. Wynton Cancel.
F. Shrewsbury.
Iohn Gage.
Thomas Cheney.

R. Rochester.
William Peter.
Rich. Southwell.

Anone after, a Citation was set vpon Paules Church doore vnder the Bishop of Londons great seale: the tenour wherof here ensueth.

¶ The Writ or Mandate of Boner B. of London, set vp at Charing Crosse, on Paules Churche doore, and at S. Martins in the fielde, for the 
Commentary  *  Close

This writ was the necessary first step in excomunicating Tooley. Foxe probably copied it from a register, now lost, containing all the documents in the Tooley case.

cityng
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield