Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1603 [1577]

Q. Mary. Persecutiō in Kent. W. Minge, Treuisam, Bland, Iohn Frankesh, Martyrs.

Marginalia1555. Iuly.scripture so much speaketh, for the more playne vnderstandyng of the simple. For MarginaliaDiuers kindes of fayth.many kyndes there be of fayth: as a man may beleeue euery thyng that is true, yet not euery truth dooth saue, neyther doth the beleuyng of euery truth iustifie a man. MarginaliaEuery truth hath his fayth, but euery truth iustifieth not, no more doth euery fayth. He that beleueth that God created al things of nought, beleueth truly. He that beleueth that God is a iust God, that he is omnipotent, that he is mercyful, that he is true of promise, beleueth well and holdeth the truth. So he that beleueth that God hath his electiō from the beginnyng, and that he also is one of the same elect and predestinate, hath a good beliefe, and thinketh well: but yet this beliefe alone, except it be seasoned with an other thyng, wyll not serue to saluatiō: as it auayled not þe old Iewes, which so thought of them selues, and yet thynke to this day, to be only Gods elect people.

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MarginaliaFayth the action: Christ the obiect of fayth.Onely the fayth whiche auayleth to saluation is that, whose obiect is the body and passion of Iesus Christ crucified. So that in the act of iustifying these two, fayth and Christ haue a mutual relation, and must alwayes concurre together, fayth as the action which apprehendeth: Christe as the obiect which is apprehended.

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MarginaliaFayth and Christ correlatiues. Christ without fayth saueth not.For neyther dooth the passion of Christ saue without faith, neyther doth fayth helpe, except it be in Christ: As we see the body of man susteined by bread and drinke, not except the same be receyued and conueyed into the stomacke: and yet neither doth the receiuing of euery thing susteyne mans body, except it bee meate and drinke, which haue power to geue nourishment. In like sort it is with fayth: for neither doth the beleuyng of euery thyng saue, but onely faith in the bloud of Christ: neither againe doth þe same bloud of Christ profite vs, except by faith it be receyued. And as the sunne being the cause of al light, shineth not but to thē only which haue eyes to see: nor yet to thē neither, vnlesse they wil open their eyes to receyue the light: so the passion of Christ is the efficient cause of saluation, but fayth is the condition wherby the said passion is to vs effectuall. MarginaliaFayth without Christ helpeth not

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And that is the cause, why we say with the scripture, that faith only iustifieth vs, not excluding thereby all other externe causes that goe before faith, as MarginaliaGrace, Election, Vocation, Christes death causes externe of our saluation.grace, mercy, electiō, vocation, the death of Christ. &c. all which be externe causes working our saluatiō through faith. But when we say that fayth only iustifieth vs, the meanyng therof is this: that of all internall actions, motions, or operations in man geuen to hym of God, MarginaliaFayth the only interne cause of mans saluation.there is no other that contenteth & pleaseth God, or standeth before his iudgemēt, or can helpe any thing to the iustifying of man before hym, but only this one action of faith in Iesus Christ the sonne of God.

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MarginaliaFayth is an action in man, but not of man.For although the action of praying, fastyng, almes, pacience, charitye, repentance, the feare & loue of God be hie gifts in man, and not of man, geuen of God to man, yet be none of al these actions in man, imputed of God to saluatiō, MarginaliaVertues and workes of charitye though they be good giftes of God in man, yet they serue not to iustification. but only this one actiō of fayth in man vpon Christ Iesus the sonne of God. Not that the action it selfe of beleeuyng, as it is a qualitie in man, doth so deserue, but because MarginaliaFayth taketh his dignitie of his obiect.it taketh that dignitie of the obiect. For as I sayd, in the act of iustifying, fayth, as it is an action in man, is not to be considered alone, but must euer go with his obiect, & taketh his vertue therof. MarginaliaLoking vp to the brasen serpent, and beleuing vpon the body of Christ cōpared.Lyke as the lookyng vp of the old Israelites dyd not of it selfe procure any health vnto thē, but the promise made in the obiect, which was the brasen serpent, whereupon they looked, gaue thē health by theyr lookyng vp. Euen so after lyke sort are we saued by our fayth & spiritual lokyng vp to the body of Christ crucified. Which fayth to define is this:

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To beleeue Iesus Christ to be the sonne of the liuyng God sent into this worlde, by his death to satisfie for our sinnes, and so to receyue the same.

And thus much touchyng election & fayth, with the order & explicatiō of the causes necessary to be cōsidered in our saluation. Wherby may appeare MarginaliaThe error of the Papistes peruerting the mynde of Gods testament, how and wherein.how farre the pretensed catholikes do swarue from the right mynd of the scriptures. For where the scriptures in declaryng the causes of saluation, do send vs only to fayth as the only condition wherby these causes haue their workyng, these catholikes do quite leaue out fayth, and in stead therof place in other conditions of doyngs, merits, wylworks, pardons, masses, and especially auricular confession, with penaunce and satisfaction for our sinnes. &c.

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¶ William Minge. 
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There is a brief statement in the Rerum (p. 503) that William Minge diedin prison in Maidstone. This was essentially all the information which Foxe ever obtained on Minge.

MarginaliaWilliam Mynge dyed in prison.THe next day after M. Bradford & Iohn leafe dyd suffer in Smithfielde, William Mynge priest dyed in prison, at Maydstone, beyng there in bonds for religion, & like to haue suffered also, if he had continued the fury of his aduersaries, whose nature was to spare & fauor none that fauored Christes pure Gospel: whiche W. Mynge, with as great constancy and boldnes yeelded vp hys lyfe in prison, as if it had pleased God to haue called hym to suffer by the fyre, as the

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other good and godly men hadde done at the stake, and as he hym selfe was readye also so to do, if it had pleased God to haue called hym therunto. 

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Note how the ending of this section was changed in the 1570 edition to emphasize Minge's readiness to die a martyr's death. This was a response to the attacks of Nicholas Harpsfield, Foxe's most important contemporary critic, on Foxe for listing people who were not truly martyrs in the Acts and Monuments.

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¶ Iames Treuisam buryed in the fieldes. 
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James Trevisam

This narrative, which first appeared in the 1570 edition, was obviously derived from personal informants, probably friends or family of Trevisam.

MarginaliaThe story of Iames Treuisam buryed in the fieldes and summoned after his death.VPon the third day of Iuly. ann. 1555. dyed one Iames Treuisam, in the Parish of S. Margaret in Lothbury vpon a sonday: who being impotēt 

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Weak, infirm.

& lame kept hys bed, for he could not ryse out of it of a long tyme. This Treuisam had a seruant one Iohn Smal which read on the Bible, and as he was in readyng, Berde þe Promoter  
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Informant.

came to the house, & would needes go vp the stayres, where he found foure persons besides hym, & hys wyfe: to wyt, the young man that read, & two men & a womā. Al which folkes, the said Berd the Promoter there being apprehended, caryed to the Coūter, where they remayned about a fortnight, for al the frends they could make. Moreouer þe said Berd would haue had also Iames the lameman hym self to Newgate in a cart (& brought the cart to the doore) but for neighbors. Neuerthelesse the poore man was faine to put in two suretyes for his forth cōmyng for he could not go out of his bed, beyng not only impotēt, but also very sicke the same tyme. So within a few dayes the sayd Iames lying in extremes, the parson of the Church named MarginaliaM. Farthyng parson of Saint Margarets in Lothbery, accuser of Iames.M. Farthyng, came to hym, and had cōmunicatiō with hym, & agreed wel, & so departed. It happened after the priest was come down into the streate, there met hym one Toller a Foūder. Yea, saith he, be ye agreed? I wyl accuse you, for he denyeth the sacrament of the altar. Vpon that the parson went vp to hym agayne, & then the priest and he could not agree. And so the parson went to the Bish. of London & told hym. The bishop answered that he should be burnt, & if he were dead, he should be buryed in a ditch. And so whē he dyed the parson was against his wyfe as much as he could, neyther woulde let her haue the coffine to put hym in, nor any thing els, but was fayne to beare hym vpō a table to Morefield, & there was he buried. The same night the body was cast vp aboue the ground, & his sheete taken from hym, & he left naked. After this the owner of the field seeyng hym, buryed hym agayne, & a fortnight after the Sumner came to his graue and summoned him to appeare at Paules before hys Ordinary to answere to such thynges as should be layd agaynst him. But what more befel vpon him, I haue not certaynly to say.HERE

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¶ The historie of M. Iohn Bland Preacher & martyr, cōstantly suffring for the gospel of Iesus Christ. 
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The Martyrdom of John Bland

The martyrdom of John Bland is particularly interesting because it is so rooted in the history of the reformation in Kent. Bland was a Cambridge graduate who was a protégé of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer and of Cranmer's commissary, Christopher Nevinson. (Bland's living of Adisham, which he had held from 1541, was in the gift of the archbishop of Canterbury). He was one of the most outspoken evangelists in Kent during the reign of Henry VIII, stripping the churches where he was pastor of images and furnishings as early as 1542, and preaching throughout eastern Kent, denouncing images, fast days, prayer to saints and other 'superstitious' practices. He also had associations with even more radical protestants in Kent; some of them rallied behind him in Mary's reign. His links to Cranmer, and his zealous evangelism made Bland a natural target for religious conservatives in Kent, and in the spring of 1543 his heresies were denounced to the king as part of the conspiracy against Cranmer which became known as the Prebendaries' Plot. Bland was indicted for heresy in September 1543, but the case against him collapsed when it became clear that Cranmer retained Henry VIII's support. Nevertheless, his Henrician adversaries would resurface in Mary's reign and play a key role in persecuting him.

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Bland's narrative of his persecution - the core of Foxe's narrative of his martyrdom - is a bewildering account of his being shifted from one form of custody to another, and more importantly, from clerical to secular jurisdiction and back again. The key problem for his enemies was that his arrest in December of 1553 came too soon. They were determined to try Bland for heresy, but the statute against heresy had been repealed under Edward VI and would not be revived until January 1555. So an elaboate game of cat and mouse followed, with Bland being arraigned in one jurisdiction, released on bond, then re-arraigned in another, all to keep Bland in some form of custody until the re-enactment of the heresy statute. In February 1555, with the statute now in force, Bland was transferred to spiritual jurisdiction for the final time and he was prosecuted for heresy.

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In the Rerum, Foxe only had a brief account of Bland's background, whichmay well have come from the protestant exile Edwin Sandys, who is rather prominently mentioned in it (Rerum, p. 503). This was reprinted in the 1563 edition, where it introduced a long letter by Bland to his father, relating the circumstances of his arrest, examinations, imprisonment down to the end of March 1555. Foxe also, in his first edition, added an account of Bland's examinations in June 1555 and his condemnation, all taken from a now lost Canterbury diocesan court book, as well as the prayer Bland was supposed to have given at his death. In the 1570 edition Foxe added a letter from Thomas Goldwell to Richard Thornden. There were no changes to this material in the 1576 or 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaIuly. 12. MarginaliaIohn Bland. Iohn Frankesh. Martyrs.THe xij. of Iuly Ioh. Bland, Ioh. Frankesh, Nich. Sheterden, & Hūfrey Myddleton were all foure burned at Canterbury together, for one cause, of the whiche nūber Frankesh & Blande were ministers, & preachers of þe word of God. The one beyng parson of Adesham: the other the vicare of Roluynden. This M. Bland was a man so litle borne for his own cōmodity, 

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Advantage, profit.

that no part of his lyfe was separated from the common & publicke vtilitie of al men. For his first doings were there imployed to the bringing vp of children in learnyng and vertue. Vnder whom were trayned diuers towardly young men, which euē at this present do hādsomly florish. MarginaliaM. Bland scholemaster to D. Sandes sometymes Byshop of Worceter.In the nūber of whō is D. Sandes, 
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Bland either taught Sandys at Furness Abbey in Yorkshire or, more likely, at St John's, Cambridge, where they were contemporaries.

a man of such learnyng & worthynes, as may well beseme a scholer meete for such a scholemayster, whom I here gladly name, for his singular gyftes of vertue and erudition.

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After this he cōmyng to the ministerie in the Church of God, or rather beyng called thereto, was inflamed with incredible desire to profit the cōgregation, which may appeare by this: that wheras he was cast into Cāterbury prisō for the preachyng of the Gospel, & deliuered once or twise from thence at the suit of his frends: yet would he needes preach the gospel agayn, as soone as he was deliuered. Wherupon he beyng þe thyrd tyme apprehēded, MarginaliaM. Bland offered by hys frendes to be deliuered, refused.when his frendes yet once agayn would haue found the meanes to haue deliuered him, if he would haue promised to abstayne from preachyng: 

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The description of Bland's career is reprinted from the Rerum (p. 503) andreflects what Foxe learned about Bland in exile. It is also somewhat garbled. The mention of Bland's earlier arrest, or arrests, appears to be based on his indictment for heresy in 1543. As far as we know, he was not imprisoned then and there was no second imprisonment. (It is worth noting how Foxe moves from stating that Bland was imprisoned once or twice to affirming that there was a 'third' arrest). After this 'third' arrest (in 1553), Bland was not, by his own account, promised release if he abstained from preaching.

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he stood in it earnestly, that he would admyt no such condition, notably well expressing vnto vs the maner & example which we read in the apostle Paul: Who shall separate vs frō the loue of Christ? tribulation, or anguish, or hūger, or nakednes, or danger, or persecutiō, or the sword? &c. But to expresse the whole life and doings of this godly martyr, seing we haue his own testimony concerning the same: it shalbe best to referre the reader to his owne report, writyng to his father of the whole discourse of his troubles frō the beginnyng almost to the latter end in order and maner as ye shal heare.

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¶ A discourse of the whole proces and doinges of Maister Bland, written and reported by him selfe to his father in hys owne letter, as foloweth 
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What follows is a very long letter, written by Bland to his father sometime between March 1555 and June 1555, describing his arrest and its causes, and what happened to him after that, down to the beginnings of proceedings against him for heresy in 1555.

DEarely beloued father in Christe Iesu, I thanke you for

your
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