Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1635 [1609]

Q. Mary. Persecutiō in Northfolke. Robert Samuell, Anne Potten, Ioane Trunchfield.

MarginaliaA letter of Syr Richard Southwell to Byshop Boner. Marginalia1555. August.vnto the Counsaile, one William Andrew of Thorpe within the Countie of Essex, an arrogant heretike. Their pleasure was to commaunde me to commyt hym vnto Newegate, where he remayneth, and as I am infourmed, hath infected a number in the prison with his heresie. 

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Andrew must have been quite effective in proselytizing for word of it to have reached the privy council. This was one of the dangers of the long incarceration of protestants; it gave them an opportunity to convert fellow prisoners. The martyr Richard Gibson was a prisoner converted to protestantism.

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Your Lordship shall doo very well (if it please you) to conuent hym before you, and to take order with him, as his case doth require. I knowe the Counsaile meant to haue writ herein vnto your Lordship,  
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This is one of a number of examples of the privy council prodding Bonner to move faster in bringing heretics to trial. This would be especially apparent in the case of John Philpot.

but by occasion of other businesse the thing hath bene omitted. Wherefore knowing their good pleasure, I did aduise the keeper of Newgate to waite vpon you with these few lines. And so referring the rest to your vertuous consideration, I remaine your good Lordships to commaund, this. 12. of Iune. 1555.

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Richard Southwel.

MarginaliaW. Andrew twyse before B. Boner.This William Andrewe being twise brought before Boner to examination, there manfully stoode in the defence of his Religion. MarginaliaW. Andrew through strait handling dyed in Newgate.At length through strayte handlyng in the Prison of Newgate, there he lost his life, which els his aduersaries would haue taken awaye by fire: and so after the popish maner he was cast out into the fielde, & by night was priuily buried by the handes of good men and faythful brethren. MarginaliaWilliam Andrew buryed in the fieldes.

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¶ The Martyrdome of Robert Samuell Preacher, suffering for the true defence of Christes Gospell. 
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Martyrdom of Robert Samuel

The full account of Robert Samuel's background, arrest, visions and martyrdom appeared in the Rerum along with the mentions of the martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield (pp. 523-25). This material was reprinted without change in the 1563 edition. Details, particularly the names of people involved, were added in the 1570 edition; after this the account of Samuel's martyrdom was unchanged. Foxe built this account on the testimony of protestantsfrom Ipswich whose accounts he obtained during his exile, particularly Rose Nottingham whom he cited as a source.

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MarginaliaM. Foster Iustice a persecutour of Christes people.MAster Foster Iustice, dwelling at Cobdock in þe Coūtie of Suffolk, & a litle frō Ipswich, being in continual hatred against þe truth & þe professors of the same, did not only not cease daye nor night to studye howe to bring those in thrall and captiuitie that were honest & godly inclined to religion, but also what soeuer they were that once came in his clawes, they easily escaped not without clog of conscience, or els losse of life: so greedy was he of bloud. Amōg many whō he had troubled, there was one Samuel MarginaliaRobert Samuell in King Edwards dayes a godly preacher.in king Edwards dayes, a very godly and right faithfull fauourer of Gods woorde, who for his valiant and constant behaueour in his sermons, seemeth worthy of high admiration. He was minister at Barfold in Suffolke, where he taught faithfully and fruitfully that flocke which the Lord had cōmitted to his charge, so long as the time would suffer him to doo his duetye.

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At the laste being remoued from the Ministerie, and put from his Benefice MarginaliaRobert Samuell remoued from the ministery. (as many other good Pastours were beside) when he could not auoyde the raging violence of the tyme, yet woulde hee not geue ouer his care that he had for his flocke, but woulde teache them priuily and by stealth, when he coulde not openly be suffered so to doo. At what tyme order was taken by the Queene, to be published by the Commissioners, that all Priestes which had maryed in Kyng Edwardes dayes, puttyng their wyues from them, should be compelled to returne agayne to their chastitie and single lyfe. MarginaliaRobert Samuell would not consent to the wicked decree of Q. Mary to put away his wyfe.This Decree woulde not Samuell stand vnto, for that he knewe it to be manifestly wicked and abominable, but determinyng with hym selfe that Gods lawes were not to bee broken for mans traditions, kept his wife styll at Ipswich, and gaue his diligence in the meane tyme to the instructyng of other whiche were about hym, as occasion serued. At laste maister Foster hauing intelligence hereof, being a great dooer in those quarters, foreslacked 

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Wasted [OED].

no time nor diligence, but eftsoones sendeth out his espials abroade, laying harde wayte for Samuell, that if he came home to his wyfe at any tyme, they might apprehend hym, and cary hym to prison.

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In conclusion, when suche as shoulde betraye hym, espyed hym at home with his wife, they bringyng woorde to the Officer, came immediately flocking about his house, and beset it with a greate companye, and so tooke hym in the night season, MarginaliaRobert Samuell apprehended in his house by night. because they durste not doo it in the daye tyme, for feare of trouble and tumult,  

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An interesting indication of sympathy for Samuel, if not for the protestants, in Ipswich.

although good Samuell dyd nothyng withstande them at all, but meekely yelded hym selfe into their clouches of his owne accorde. When they had thus caught hym, they put him into Ipswiche Gayle, MarginaliaRobert Samuell put in Ipswich Gayle. where he passed his tyme meekely among his godly brethren, so long as he was permitted to continue there. Howbeit not long after, being taken from thence, he was carryed (through malice of the wicked sorte) to Norwich, MarginaliaRobert Samuell remoued to Norwich. where the saide Bishop Doctour Hopton, (whether he or Doctour Dunnynges his Chauncellour)  
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Neither Dunning or Hopton were named in Rerum (p. 523). Note that Foxefirst names Dunning in 1563 and Hopton in 1570.

full lyke vnmercyfull Prelates exercised greate crueltie agaynste hym, as in deede they were men in that tyme of persecution, as had not their matches for straytnes and cruell tormenting the bodyes of the Saintes among all the rest beside, and specially through the procuryng of Dunnynges. For although the other were sharpe enough in their generation: yet could

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they be satisfied with imprisonment and death, and woulde goe no further. MarginaliaThe cruelty of Dunninges the bloudy Chauncellour.Neyther did I euer yet heare of any besides these, whiche so farre exceeded all boundes of pitie and compassion in tormentyng their poore brethren as this Bishop dyd: in suche sorte that many of them he peruerted and brought quite from the truth, and some from their wyttes also.

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The bishop therfore, or els his Chācellor, thinking that he might as easily preuaile with Samuel, as he had done wt other before, MarginaliaThe cruell handling of Robert Samuell in prison.kept hym in a very strait prison at his first cōmyng, wher he was chained bolt vpright to a great post, in suche sort, that standing onely on typtoe, he was faine to stay vp the whole paise or weight of his body thereby. And to make amendes for the crueltie or paine that he suffered, they added a far more greuous torment, keping hym without meate and drinke, wherby he was vnmercyfully vexed through hūger and thirst: sauing that he had euery day allowed two or three mouthfuls of bread, & three sponfuls of water, to the ende rather that he might be reserued to farther torment, then that they would preserue his life. MarginaliaRobert Samuell famished in prison. O worthy constancie of the martyr. O pitiles hartes of papistes, worthy to be complained of , and to be accused before God and nature.  

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Note that the statement in the 1563 edition that rage of the 'papists' was worse than the devils in hell was replaced with a somewhat less inflamatory statement in the 1570 edition. This is one of a number of examples of Foxe toning down his language in his second edition.

O the wonderfull strength of Christe in his members? Whose stomacke, though it had bene made of Adamant stone, would not haue relented at these intollerable vexations, and exreme paynes aboue nature? MarginaliaRobert Samuell desirous to drinke his owne water, and could notHowe often tymes would he haue drunken his owne water, but his bodye was so dryed vp with this long emptines, that he was not able to make one drop of water?

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At the laste when he was brought forth to be burned, 

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Foxe had a copy of Samuel's condemnation (BL, Harley 521, fos. 205r-206v), but he did not print or even refer to it. It is not because there was anything embarrassing to Foxe in it, but that he preferred to draw on sympathetic personal testimony, such as he obtained for Samuel, over official records.

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which was but a trifle in comparison of those paynes that he had passed, MarginaliaStrange visions that hapned to Samuell. Samuell brought to burning.certaine there were that hearde hym declare what straunge thinges had happened vnto hym during the tyme of his imprisonmēt: to wyt, þt after he had bene famished or pined with hunger two or three dayes together, he then fell into a sleepe, as it were one halfe in a slumber, at whiche tyme one clad all in white, seemed to stande before hym, which ministred comfort vnto hym by these wordes: Samuel, Samuel, be of good chere, and take a good hart vnto thee. For after this day shalt thou neuer be either hungry or thirsty: Which thyng came euen to passe accordingly: for speedyly after he was burned, and from that tyme tyll he shoulde suffer, he fealt neither hunger nor thirst. And this declared he, to the ende (as he said) that all men might behold the wonderfull workes of God. Many moe like matters cōcerning the great comfort he had of Christ in his afflictiōs, he could vtter (he said) besides this, but that shamfastnes and modestie would not suffer hym to vtter it. MarginaliaGreat comfortes ministred by the Lord to Samuell in his paynfull prisonment. And yet if it had pleased God, I would he had bene lesse modest in that behalfe, that the loue and care that Christe hath of his, might haue the more appeared thereby vnto vs by such present argumentes, for the more plentifull comforte of the godly, though there be sufficient testimonies of the same in the holy scriptures already.

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MarginaliaAn other memorable vision of Samuell in prison.No lesse memorable it is, and worthy also to be noted concerning the three ladders which he told to diuers he saw in his sleepe, set vp toward heauen: of the which there was one somewhat longer then the rest, but yet at length they became one, ioynyng (as it were) al three together. This was a forewarnyng reuealed vnto hym, declaryng vndoubtedly the martyrdome, first of hym selfe, and then the death of two honest women, which were brought forth and suffered in the same towne anone after.

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As this godly martyr was going to the fire, there came MarginaliaThe name of this mayde was Rose Nattingham.a certaine mayde to hym which tooke hym about the necke and kyssed hym, who being marked by them that were present, was sought for the next daye after, to be had to prison and burned, as the very partie her selfe informed me: 

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Foxe relates the story of the maid kissing Samuel in the Rerum (pp. 524-25), and he stated that she had told the story of this encounter to Foxe himself in 1563, but Foxe did not name the woman as Rose Nottingham until 1570.

Howbeit, as God of his goodnes would haue it, she escaped their fiery handes, keeping her selfe secrete in the towne a good while after. But as this mayd, called Rose Nattingham, was marueilously preserued by the prouidence of God: so there were other two honest women dyd fall into the rage and furie of that tyme. MarginaliaTwo godly women, the one a Bruers wyfe, the other a shomakers wyfe, apprehended.The one was a Bruers wyfe, the other was a Shoomakers wife, but both together nowe espoused to a newe husband Christ.

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With these two was this mayd 

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This story first appeared in the Rerum and is another indication that RoseNottingham furnished Foxe with her account of Samuel during Foxe's exile in Basel.

aforesaid very familiar & wel acquainted, who on a tyme geuyng coūsayle to þe one of them, that shee should conuey her selfe away while shee had tyme and space, seeing she could not away with the queenes vniust proceedings, had this answere at her hands againe: I know wel, saith she, that it is lawful enough to flee away, which remedy you may vse, if you list. But my case standeth otherwise. MarginaliaThis godly wife exhorted to flye, would not so do, hauing husband and children to sticke to.I am tyed to an husband, & haue besides a sort of yong childrē at home: and then I know not how my husband, being a carnal man, wyl take my departure from hym: therfore I am mynded for the loue of Christ and his truth, to stand to the extremitie of the matter.

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And
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