Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1650 [1624]

Letters of D. Ridley Byshop of London, Martyr.

and with the first was layd handes vpon and committed to prison, as before hath sufficiently bene expressed: MarginaliaB. Ridley in the Tower. MarginaliaQ. Mary. An. 1555. October.fyrst in the Tower, then after translated from thence with the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Maister Latimer to Oxforde, was with them inclosed in the common Gayle and prison of Bocardo, 

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A Bocardo is a type of syllogism whose logic was supposed to be impossible to escape. The Oxford gaol, on the north gate of the city, was nicknamed the Bocardoin consequence.

MarginaliaByshop Ridley remoued to the prison of Bocardo in Oxford. while at length being disseuered from them, he was committed to custodie in the house of one Irish, where hee remayned tyll the last day of his death and martyrdome, which was from the yeare of our Lord. 1554. tyl the yeare 1555. and 16. day of October.

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Furthermore, as touching his disputations & conflicts had at Oxford, MarginaliaRead before pag. 1371. and also of his determination had at Cambrdge, also his trauailes in perswading and instructing the Lady Mary before shee was Queene, MarginaliaBefore pag. 1356 his reasons & conference likewise had in the Tower at the Lieutenants boord, enough hath bene said already. Besides this, other conferēces he had in prison wyth Doct. Cranmer & maister Latimer, which because they be somwhat long here to be inserted, & because I see this volume swelleth already with abundance of other matter, and partly also for that the same be expressed before in our first edition, page. 1285. MarginaliaRead in our first edition. pag. 1285. I thought good either to referre the reader to the same, or els to deferre hym tyl the latter end of this volume, where in the Appendix, God willing, both this and other diuers omissions and treatises shalbe supplied.

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In the meane tyme it shal content the Reader for this present to haue certaine of his Letters, with a fewe other writinges of his, whiche we thought here to adioyne vnto the storie of his lyfe aboue described, before we come to the death and burnyng of hym and Maister Latimer together: the order and prosecuting of whiche his Letters here vnder beginneth.

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¶ Here foloweth the Letters of the reuerend Bishop and Martyr, Nicholas Ridley. 
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The Letters of Nicholas Ridley

None of these letters appeared in the Rerum, but this may have been due to the pressure on Foxe to finish the Rerum in time for the Frankfurt book fair in September 1559. (It is worth noting that Foxe printed one of Ridley's 'farewell' letters in November 1559, but he did not print it in the Rerum). In any case, out of the ten letters of Ridley's which Foxe printed - this does not count the two 'farewell' letters - six first appeared in the 1563 edition. The remaining four letters were first printed in the Letters of the Martyrs and added to the 1570 edition. These letters were reprinted in the 1576 and 1583 editions without change.

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¶ A letter sent from B. Ridley and his prison felowes, vnto M. Bradford, and his prison felowes in the Kinges Bench in Southwarke. an. 1554. 
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Ridley was moved from the Tower to Oxford in March 1554; this letter was written after 8 May of that year. This letter was first printed in the 1563 edition, then in Letters of the Martyrs (pp. 58-60).

MarginaliaA letter of Byshop Ridley to Master Bradford and others.WEll beloued in Christe our Saueour, we all with one hart wishe to you, with al those that loue God in deede and truth, grace and health, and specially to our dearely beloued companions whiche are in Christes cause, and the cause both of their brethren and of thir owne saluation, to put their necke willingly vnder the yoke of Christes crosse. Howe ioyfull it was to vs to heare the reporte of Doctour Taylour and of his godly confession. &c. 

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This is a reference to the letter of 8 May 1554 sent by Rowland Taylor and other imprisoned protestants to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (see 1563, pp. 1001-03;1570, pp. 1640-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400 and 1583, pp. 1469-71).

I ensure you, it is hard for me to expresse.

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Blessed be God, whiche was and is the geuer of that, and of all godly strength and stomacke in the tyme of aduersitie. As for the rumours that haue or do goe abrode, either of our relenting or massing, MarginaliaFalse reportes spread by the policye of the Papistes.we trust that they whiche knowe God, and their duetie towardes their brethren in Christe, wyll not be too light of credence. For it is not the sclaunderers euyll tongue, but a mans own euyll deede that can with God defile a man: and therefore with Gods grace, ye shal neuer haue other cause to do otherwise then ye say ye do, that is not to doubt, but that we wyll, by Gods grace, continue. &c. Like rumour as ye haue hearde of our commyng to London, hathe bene here spreadde of the commyng of certaine learned men prisoners, hither from London: but as yet we know no certaintie whether of these rumors is, or shalbe more true. Know you, that we haue you in our dayly remembrance, and wishe you and all the rest of our foresaid companions, wel in Christ.

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MarginaliaThis letter seemeth to be written a litle before, about the tyme of the burning of M. Rogers.It should do vs much comfort, if we might haue knowledge of the state of the rest of our most dearely beloued, which in this troublesome tyme do stand in Christes cause, and in the defence of the truth therof. Somewhat we haue hearde of maister Hoopers matter: 

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I.e., situation.

but of the rest neuer a deale. We long to heare of father Crome, Doctor Sandys, M. Saunders, Veron, Beacon, Rogers. &c.  
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Edward Crome had been imprisoned in the Fleet since January 1554; he would recant and be released around February 1555. Edwin Sandys had been imprisoned since January 1553, but was released in the spring of 1554 and arrived in Antwerp in May. Laurence Saunders had been imprisoned since October 1553. Jean Veron had been imprisoned since August 1553; he would remain in prison throughout Mary's reign. Thomas Becon had been imprisoned in the Tower since August 1553, buthe was released on 24 March 1554 and fled to Stasbourg. John Rogers was placed under house arrest in July 1553 and committed to Newgate in January 1554.

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We are in good health, thankes be to God, and yet the manner of our entreating  
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Treatment.

doth change as sowre ale doth in summer. It is reported to vs of our keepers, that the Vniuersitie beareth vs heauily.  
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Oxford University paid for the maintenance of Ridley, Cranmer and Latimer. Ridley is saying that it was expensive for Oxford to pay for the upkeep of the three prisoners.

MarginaliaWhatsoeuer fault is done, the cause is layd vpon the poore Christians.A coale chaunced to fall in the night out of the chimney, and burnt a hole in the floore, and no more harme was done, þe Bayliffes seruantes sitting by þe fire. An other night there chaunced (as master Bailiffes tolde vs) a drunken felowe to multiply wordes, and for the same he was set in Bocardo. 
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A Bocardo was a syllogism whose conclusion was supposed to be inescapable. As a joke the prison in Oxford, in the north gate of the town, was commonly called the Bocardo.

Vpon these thinges (as is reported) there is risen a rumor in the towne & countrey about, that we should haue broken the Prison with such violence, as if Maister Bailiffes had not played the pretye men,  
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Acted bravely.

we shoulde haue made a scape.  
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An escape.

We had out of our prison a wal that we might haue walken vpon, and our seruauntes had libertie to go abroade in the towne or fieldes: but now both they and we

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are restrained of both. MarginaliaM. Ridley and his felow prisoners in Bocardo, restrayned of their libertie.

My Lord of Worcester passed by through Oxford, but he dyd not visite vs. 

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The bishop of Worcester, Nicholas Heath, had been held in Ridley's custody.

The same day beganne our restraint to be more, and the booke of the Communion was taken from vs by the Bayliffes, at the Maiors commaundement, as the Bayliffes dyd report to vs. No man is licenced to come vnto vs: afore they might that would, see vs vpon the wal: but that is so grudged at, and so euyll reported, that we are now restrained. &c. Sir, blessed be God, with al our euyl reportes, grudges, and restraintes, we are meery in God, and al our cure and care is and shal be (by Gods grace) to please and serue hym, of whom we looke and hope after this temporal and momentany miseries, to haue eternal ioy and perpetual felicitie with Abraham, Isaac, and Iacob, Peter & Paul, and al the heauenly company of the angels in heauen, through Iesus Christ our Lord. MarginaliaThe ingratitude of the scholars in not visiting the Byshops in Bocardo.As yet there was neuer learned man, or any scholer or other that visited vs since we came into Bocardo, which now in Oxford may bee called a Colledge of * Marginalia* Bocardo a Colledge of Quondams. Quondams.  
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A quondam is the former holder of an office. Ridley is calling the Bocardo a college of 'quondams' because he, Latimer and Cranmer who were imprisoned there were all former bishops.

For as ye knowe, we be no fewer then three: and I dare say, euery one well contented with his portion, which I do recken to be our heauenly fathers fatherly good and gracious gyft. Thus fare you wel. We shal by Gods grace one day meete together and be meery. The day assuredly approcheth apace: the Lorde graunt that it may shortly come. For before that day come, I feare me the worlde wyll waxe  
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Grow, increase.

worse and worse. But then all our enemies shalbe ouerthrowen and troden vnder foote: righteousnes and truth thē shal haue the victorie, and beare the bel away, wherof the Lord graunt vs to be partakers, and al that loueth truely the truth.

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We all praye you, as ye can, to cause all our commendations to be made to all suche as ye knowe dyd visite vs and you, when we were in the Tower, with their freendly remembraunces and benefites. MarginaliaThe goodnes of Misteres Wilkinson, and Anne Warcup to helpe the Bishops in Bocardo.Maistresse Wilkenson and maistresse Warcup haue not forgotten vs, but euer since we came into Bocardo, with their charitable and frendly beneuolence haue comforted vs: not that els we dyd lacke (for God be blessed, he euer hytherto hath prouided sufficiently for vs) but that is a great comfort, and an occasion for vs to blesse God, when we see that he maketh them so frendly to tender vs, whom some of vs were neuer familiarly acquainted withal.

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Yours in Christ, Nich. Ridley.

¶ A Letter of Maister Ridley, sent to a Cosin of hys. 
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This letter was first printed in 1563 and then in Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 79-80. It was then reprinted in every edition of the Acts and Monuments.

MarginaliaAn other letter of Bishop Ridley to his Cosin.GOds holy spirite be with you now and euer. Amen.

When I call to remembraunce (beloued Cosin) the state of those that for feare of trouble, either for losse of goodes, wyl do in the sight of the world those thinges that they know & are assured are contrary to the wyl of God, I can do no lesse but lament their case, MarginaliaM. Ridley lamenteth the state of them, which for feare of trouble doe wynd with the worlde and goe contrary to their conscience. being assured the ende therof wyl be so pitiful (without speedy repentaunce) that I tremble and feare to haue it in remembrance. I woulde to God it laye vppon some earthly burden, so that freedome of cōscience might be geuen vnto them. I wrote (as God knoweth) not of presumption, but onely lamenting the state of those, whom I thought now in this dangerous tyme should haue geuen both you and me comfortable instructions. But (alas) in steede therof we haue instructions to folow (I lament me to rehearse it) superstitious Idolatrie. Yea, and that woorst of all is, they wyl seeke to proue it by the Scripture. The Lorde for his mercye turne their hartes. Amen. Commend me. &c.

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Yours, Nicholas Ridley.

¶ To Maister Bradford. 
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This letter was first printed in Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 62-63 and then in the 1570 edition, and all subsequent editions, of the Acts and Monuments. BL, Harley 416, fo. 32v and ECL 260, fo. 116r are copies of this letter in Foxe's papers.

MarginaliaAn other worthy letter of B. Ridley to M. Bradford.BRother Bradford, I wishe you and your companye in Christ, yea and all the holy brotherhoode that nowe with you in diuers prisons suffereth and beareth paciently Christes crosse for the maintenaunce of his Gospell, grace, mercye and peace from God the father, and from our Lord Iesus Christ.

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Syr, considering the state of this chiualrie and warfare, wherein I doubt not but wee be set to fight vnder Christes banner, and his crosse agaynst our ghostly enemie the Deuill and the olde serpent Satan, me thinke I perceiue two things to be his most perilous & most dangerous engines whiche he hath to impugne Christes veritie, his gospel, & his faith: MarginaliaTwo mayne pillers holding vp the Sinagoge of Sathan.and the same two also to be the most massy postes, and most mighty pyllers, wherby he mainteyneth and vpholdeth his Satanicall synagogue. 

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I.e., the Roman catholic church.

These two sir, are they, in my iudgement: Marginalia1. False Doctrine of the Sacrament.the one, his false doctrine & idolatrical vse of the Lordes supper, and Marginalia2. The Popes primacy.the other, the wicked and abominable vsurpation of the primacie of the See of Rome. By these two Satan seemeth to me principally to

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